18

resultat(er)

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Type af publikation
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Creative Europe programme 2021-2027

26-11-2019

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The existing programme focuses ...

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The existing programme focuses on the economic dimension of the cultural sector and its contribution to job creation and economic growth. Some stakeholders have voiced concern at taking such a strongly economic approach to culture. Under proposed programme, the economic dimension is one axis alongside the social dimension, and culture's contribution to international relations. The proposed framework for cultural policy therefore highlights not only the economic dimension of the cultural and creative sectors, but also the role of culture in social cohesion and its relation to creative and artistic freedom and diversity, and freedom and plurality of media. Both Parliament and Council have agreed positions on the proposal, and trilogue negotiations started in autumn 2019 with a view to finding agreement before Council’s first reading. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Promoting European culture

28-06-2019

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural ...

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural identity and expression. From the economic point of view, the cultural and creative sector, which employs 8.4 million people in the European Union, is dynamic and has a large potential for growth due to its diversity and scope for individual creative freedom. Yet the development of this potential is hampered by barriers, notably linguistic diversity, fragmentation and different financial mechanisms across the EU. The EU's cultural and creative industry also faces challenge from digital technologies and global competition, particularly from the United States' (US) audiovisual industry, and from US and Chinese diplomatic efforts to promote their cultural output. Under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the EU's role in the context of cultural policy is a supportive and complementary one, direct responsibility in the area being largely a matter for the individual Member States. Nevertheless, since 2014, these challenges have been addressed at the EU level, inter alia via the strengthening of the digital single market, which is essential for access to culture, the circulation of European cultural works, the fair remuneration of creators and fair competition. Since the economic crisis, additional funding has also been made available for the sector via the European Fund for Strategic Investment introduced by the Juncker Commission in 2015. As indicated in a 2017 European Commission communication on the role of culture and education, the synergies between the socio-economic aspects are to be enhanced. The European Year of Cultural Heritage in 2018 is to feed into a reflection and actions related to shared culture and history. These issues are addressed in the New European Agenda for Culture, while the new multiannual financial framework for 2021-2027 envisages increased funding for culture. This will also support efforts to combine artistic and technological skills, which are a prerequisite for artistic expression in the new digital environment. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive

25-01-2019

Following political agreement with the Council, a vote in plenary on 2 October 2018 saw Parliament adopt the updated EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive, based on the proposal presented by the Commission on 25 May 2016. The overarching goal of the proposal was to bring about a balance between competitiveness and consumer protection. It therefore aimed to introduce flexibility when restrictions only applicable to TV are no longer justified, promote European films, protect minors and tackle hate ...

Following political agreement with the Council, a vote in plenary on 2 October 2018 saw Parliament adopt the updated EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive, based on the proposal presented by the Commission on 25 May 2016. The overarching goal of the proposal was to bring about a balance between competitiveness and consumer protection. It therefore aimed to introduce flexibility when restrictions only applicable to TV are no longer justified, promote European films, protect minors and tackle hate speech more efficiently. The proposal also reflected a new approach to online platforms. Following adoption of the revised directive, EU Member States now have to bring the new rules into national law by 19 September 2020. Sixth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The place of women in European film productions: Fighting the celluloid ceiling

17-01-2019

The sexual assault allegations brought against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein laid bare the painful reality for scores of women working in the film industry around the world. However, sexual harassment is seemingly just the tip of the iceberg in an industry where gender inequalities relating to biased representation and pay are arguably systematic and pervasive. Europe's own film industry has not been spared. The weighted average of films directed by women in the 2012-2016 period is just 19.6 ...

The sexual assault allegations brought against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein laid bare the painful reality for scores of women working in the film industry around the world. However, sexual harassment is seemingly just the tip of the iceberg in an industry where gender inequalities relating to biased representation and pay are arguably systematic and pervasive. Europe's own film industry has not been spared. The weighted average of films directed by women in the 2012-2016 period is just 19.6 %, with country results varying from 5 % (Latvia) to 30 % (Sweden). More worryingly, research shows that the various positions in the film industry appear to be dominated by one or the other gender. Thus, women are over-represented in professions traditionally considered feminine – such as costume design and editing – and under-represented in others viewed as more technical, such as those dealing with sound, music and image. To start redressing these imbalances, various EU-level initiatives have been introduced in support of female film projects. One such example is the LUX Film Prize, through which over the past 11 years the European Parliament has been consistently encouraging the dissemination of films directed by women and portraying strong, inspiring female characters. For its part, the European Commission has started measuring women's participation in key positions in projects supported under the Media strand of its Creative Europe programme. Similarly, it is currently considering specific ways for a more gender-balanced provision of support. Yet again, the cultural support fund of the Council of Europe – Eurimages – committed in its 2018-2020 strategy to achieving equal distribution of co production funding between women and men by the year 2020; the distribution of funding currently stands at 38 %. Sweden is the EU leader in terms of regulatory policies at national level. The critical acclaim won by Swedish female filmmakers in the past 10 years has shown that by applying a methodical and systematic approach it is possible to achieve gender equality without compromising quality.

Creative Europe Programme (2014 to 2020)

26-10-2018

The study provides an up-to-date evaluation of the implementation of the selected smaller and bigger actions within the Creative Europe programme (2014 to 2020) with focus on the European dimension and European added value of the undertaken actions as well as their visibility.

The study provides an up-to-date evaluation of the implementation of the selected smaller and bigger actions within the Creative Europe programme (2014 to 2020) with focus on the European dimension and European added value of the undertaken actions as well as their visibility.

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive

26-09-2018

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive is the cornerstone of media regulation in the EU. It ensures a minimum harmonisation of certain aspects of national legislation facilitating the circulation of such services in the EU. The European Commission proposed an update of the directive to improve the balance between competitiveness and consumer protection, while reflecting a new approach to online platforms. The European Parliament is due to vote during its October I plenary session on the text agreed ...

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive is the cornerstone of media regulation in the EU. It ensures a minimum harmonisation of certain aspects of national legislation facilitating the circulation of such services in the EU. The European Commission proposed an update of the directive to improve the balance between competitiveness and consumer protection, while reflecting a new approach to online platforms. The European Parliament is due to vote during its October I plenary session on the text agreed in trilogue negotiations.

Broadcasting of major sports events in the EU

28-05-2018

The topic of audiovisual sports rights has gained increasing relevance, including in the light of the upcoming football World Cup in Russia this summer. As most people will not be able to attend the sports games they wish to see, they will use the media to hear the news or to get full direct coverage through live broadcasts. However, media coverage of sports events is regulated by complex copyright rules and the exclusive right to broadcast top sports events live comes at a cost. In 2014, the global ...

The topic of audiovisual sports rights has gained increasing relevance, including in the light of the upcoming football World Cup in Russia this summer. As most people will not be able to attend the sports games they wish to see, they will use the media to hear the news or to get full direct coverage through live broadcasts. However, media coverage of sports events is regulated by complex copyright rules and the exclusive right to broadcast top sports events live comes at a cost. In 2014, the global sports rights market was worth nearly €19 billion. In the EU, broadcasters spent around €5.8 billion on the acquisition of rights in 2009, which represented nearly 17 % of their total €34.5 billion programming spend. But how exclusive can audiovisual rights be?

Research for CULT Committee - Creative Europe - Media: Implementation, First Experiences

15-07-2016

Creative Europe brings together the former Culture, MEDIA and MEDIA Mundus Programmes to support the cultural, creative and audio-visual sector. The new programme renews supports for development, distribution and promotion but introduces encouragement of innovative business models, of international co-productions, and of cross-cultural projects as well as training in film literacy and audience development. Responses to the anonymous questionnaire send to the Creative Europe Desks (CEDs) reveal ...

Creative Europe brings together the former Culture, MEDIA and MEDIA Mundus Programmes to support the cultural, creative and audio-visual sector. The new programme renews supports for development, distribution and promotion but introduces encouragement of innovative business models, of international co-productions, and of cross-cultural projects as well as training in film literacy and audience development. Responses to the anonymous questionnaire send to the Creative Europe Desks (CEDs) reveal the main challenges in the implementation of the programme and the main difficulties experienced by applicants. The conclusions and recommendations fall into three categories. • Communication between, CEDs, EACEA and the two DG, communication could be even better and CEDs should be encouraged to develop greater collaboration with local applicants. • The EACEA should work harder to develop optimal e-tools adapted to its different targets and must revise the participant’s portal in a user-friendly approach. • Guidelines are well adapted to professionals' needs, but a review of the automatic points system, which many consider anticompetitive, must be launched. Finally, CEDs have a key role to play in the future success of the programme.

Ekstern forfatter

Media Consulting Group: Alain Modot and Laura Almantaitė

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive: state of play

11-11-2015

The EU's audiovisual sector comprises over 100 000 companies and employs more than 760 000 people. Audiovisual media services however outrun market considerations by playing a central role in modern democratic societies, which accounts for the application of specific rules across the European Union (EU). Current transmission capacities have come a long way from the first linear broadcasts. The Internet, together with media convergence, is changing the way people use media. Although television is ...

The EU's audiovisual sector comprises over 100 000 companies and employs more than 760 000 people. Audiovisual media services however outrun market considerations by playing a central role in modern democratic societies, which accounts for the application of specific rules across the European Union (EU). Current transmission capacities have come a long way from the first linear broadcasts. The Internet, together with media convergence, is changing the way people use media. Although television is still the most popular medium in the EU and globally, internet comes close behind. This shift in media consumption holds both promises and challenges. The advent of internet-enabled TV faces regulators with complex dilemmas, such as protecting young people from harmful content and banning incitement to hatred, while still ensuring freedom of speech. The Audiovisual Media Services (AVMS) Directive covers all services with audiovisual content, including 'on-demand', and audiovisual advertising. However, it takes into account the degree of user control over the service and therefore on-demand services are subject to lighter regulation. Member States are encouraged to use co-regulation and/or self-regulation as complementary approaches to the Directive's provisions, in particular in relation to commercial communications and the protection of minors. The Commission's 2012 report on the implementation of the AVMS Directive concluded that in general, the EU regulatory framework performed well. The Commission is currently processing the results from a public consultation on the functioning of the Directive and is expected to present a proposal for a review by the end of 2015.

Creative Europe Programme

14-09-2015

Creative Europe, which brings together under one roof three different culture and media-related programmes from the previous 2007-13 funding period, is designed to support the activities of the cultural and audiovisual sectors in participating countries, and generate synergies between the two sectors. Its €1.46 billion budget represents a 9% increase on the total spent in the various sub-programmes in 2007-13. Of this envelope, 31% is earmarked for culture, 56% for media and 13% for the cross-sectoral ...

Creative Europe, which brings together under one roof three different culture and media-related programmes from the previous 2007-13 funding period, is designed to support the activities of the cultural and audiovisual sectors in participating countries, and generate synergies between the two sectors. Its €1.46 billion budget represents a 9% increase on the total spent in the various sub-programmes in 2007-13. Of this envelope, 31% is earmarked for culture, 56% for media and 13% for the cross-sectoral strand, including a Guarantee Facility to be launched in 2016.

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Demographic Outlook for the EU in 2020: Understanding population trends in the EU
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