9

Ergebnis(se)

Wort/Wörter
Art der Veröffentlichung
Politikbereich
Verfasser
Schlagwortliste
Datum

Is transparency the key to citizens’ trust?

11-04-2019

Trust in political institutions is a key element of representative democracies. Trust in the rule of law is also the basis for democratic participation of citizens. According to the spring 2018 Eurobarometer survey of public awareness of the EU institutions, 50 % of respondents indicated they trust the European Parliament, which represents a 34 % increase since the beginning of the 2014-2019 legislative term. A transparent political decision-making processes has become a common objective to help ...

Trust in political institutions is a key element of representative democracies. Trust in the rule of law is also the basis for democratic participation of citizens. According to the spring 2018 Eurobarometer survey of public awareness of the EU institutions, 50 % of respondents indicated they trust the European Parliament, which represents a 34 % increase since the beginning of the 2014-2019 legislative term. A transparent political decision-making processes has become a common objective to help strengthen citizens’ trust in policy-makers and enhance the accountability of public administrations. In this regard, regulation of lobbying (the exchange between policy makers and stakeholders), and bolstering the integrity of this process, is often considered a vital ingredient. Public expectations for increased transparency of the exchange between policy-makers and interest representatives varies from one political system to the next, but it has increasingly become a topic of debate for parliaments across Europe, and a regular demand during election campaigns.

New lobbying law in France

04-07-2018

Since 1 May 2018, France's new lobbying law is fully implemented. Part and parcel of recent legislation on transparency (Sapin II package), it was adopted on 9 December 2016, providing a regulatory framework for lobbying activities and establishing a mandatory national register ('le repertoire') for lobbyists. In a step-by-step process, first, the repertoire, in which all active interest representatives must sign up, was created on 1 July 2017. After registering by 1 January 2018, interest representatives ...

Since 1 May 2018, France's new lobbying law is fully implemented. Part and parcel of recent legislation on transparency (Sapin II package), it was adopted on 9 December 2016, providing a regulatory framework for lobbying activities and establishing a mandatory national register ('le repertoire') for lobbyists. In a step-by-step process, first, the repertoire, in which all active interest representatives must sign up, was created on 1 July 2017. After registering by 1 January 2018, interest representatives were then under the obligation to report their lobbying activities in this repertoire by 30 April 2018. The repertoire, with just over 1 00 registrants to date, is overseen by the 'Haute Autorité pour la Transparence de la Vie Publique' (HATVP). In France, the cultural acceptance of lobbying as a profession has been slow, and the new law will make a huge difference in terms of making lobbying activities public, with a regulation closely following the Irish example. The Sapin II package aims for a general increase in public accountability and transparency of the decision-making processes. Some incremental steps in this direction had been taken previously, primarily with the establishment of the HATVP in January 2014 as an independent body to oversee the integrity and transparency of the national public institutions.

Revolving doors in the EU and US

04-07-2018

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US ...

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US public remains unconvinced. Scepticism may be fuelled by new exceptions made to the rules – retroactive ethics pledge waivers – and the refusal of the White House to disclose the numbers or beneficiaries of said waivers. Watchdog organisations argue that not only has the Trump administration so far failed to 'drain the swamp', it has ended up doing quite the opposite. In the EU, where revolving door cases are increasingly being covered in the media, both the European Parliament and Commission have adopted Codes of Conduct, regulating the activities of current and former Members, Commissioners, and even staff. The European Ombudsman, Emily O'Reilly, has on numerous occasions spoken out in favour of further measures, such as 'cooling-off periods', and has carried out several inquiries into potentially problematic revolving door cases. Following calls from Parliament, the Juncker Commission adopted a new and stronger Code of Conduct for Commissioners early in 2018. Even so, no one single Code can hope to bring an end to the debate.

Regulating lobbying in Canada

03-05-2017

The recent populist backlash against traditional political systems in many countries has put the issue of ethics at the forefront of government attempts to demonstrate that public policy is carried out without undue influence or interference from vested interests. As one of the first four countries in the world to regulate parliamentary lobbying activities, Canada provides an interesting example of legislation aimed at boosting transparency, honesty and integrity in public decision-making. Evolving ...

The recent populist backlash against traditional political systems in many countries has put the issue of ethics at the forefront of government attempts to demonstrate that public policy is carried out without undue influence or interference from vested interests. As one of the first four countries in the world to regulate parliamentary lobbying activities, Canada provides an interesting example of legislation aimed at boosting transparency, honesty and integrity in public decision-making. Evolving from the 1989 Lobbyists Registration Act, today’s Lobbying Act lays out the types of activities concerned and the processes of lobbying regulation, including sanctions, leading to a new wave of investigations and rulings. While a decision on the European Commission’s proposal for an obligatory transparency register is awaited, registration with the Registry of Lobbyists in Canada is already mandatory for any individual who is paid to carry out lobbying activities, on their own or on behalf of others. Lobbying activities are considered to include all oral and arranged communications with a public office about legislative proposals, bills, resolutions or grants. Consultant lobbyists must also declare meetings held with public office-holders, and communications they make regarding contracts for grants, on a monthly basis. Reporting takes the form of regular monthly ‘returns’, lodged with the Commissioner of Lobbying. In cases of conviction for a breach of the rules, sanctions can include fines and imprisonment. The lobbyists’ code of conduct, established in consultation with the lobbying community, is enforced by the Commissioner of Lobbying and provides guidance on access to public office-holders, conflicts of interest, and gifts. However, there are no fines or imprisonment for breaches of this code.

Lobbying regulation framework in Poland

12-12-2016

Poland became one of the first countries in Europe to regulate lobbying activities with the introduction of its Lobbying Act, which entered into force on 7 March 2006. It aims to increase the transparency of lobbying in three ways: 1) an obligation for the government and ministries to publish their legislative agendas; 2) the creation of a lobby register; 3) requiring all public authorities participating in the law-making process to declare their lobby contacts. The Lobbying Act introduced the concept ...

Poland became one of the first countries in Europe to regulate lobbying activities with the introduction of its Lobbying Act, which entered into force on 7 March 2006. It aims to increase the transparency of lobbying in three ways: 1) an obligation for the government and ministries to publish their legislative agendas; 2) the creation of a lobby register; 3) requiring all public authorities participating in the law-making process to declare their lobby contacts. The Lobbying Act introduced the concept of 'professional lobbying', defined as a paid action performed on behalf of third parties aimed at influencing a public authority in the legislative process. It also set up a register for those who carry out such activities. There is a fee required upon registration, and in the event of lobbying by an unregistered entity, the minister responsible for administrative affairs can issue a fine. Apart from the lobby register set up under the Lobbying Act, the two parliamentary chambers keep their own registers of lobbyists accessing their premises. However, as these three registers lack any relevant information on where and how lobbyists seek to gain influence, and have gathered only around 400 entries over 10 years, they have been criticised for not providing reliable information on the lobbying landscape in Poland.

Transparency of lobbying: The example of the Irish Lobby Register

26-07-2016

On 11 March 2015, Ireland’s Regulation of Lobbying Act 2015 was signed into law by President Michael D. Higgins. The Act provides for, inter alia, the establishment of a mandatory register of lobbyists and lays out its rules. The Irish Lobby Register was only the sixth fully mandatory lobby register among the EU Member States, and attracted widespread attention due to its comprehensive scope. The drive to develop the legislation was strengthened by a number of public scandals in the country. The ...

On 11 March 2015, Ireland’s Regulation of Lobbying Act 2015 was signed into law by President Michael D. Higgins. The Act provides for, inter alia, the establishment of a mandatory register of lobbyists and lays out its rules. The Irish Lobby Register was only the sixth fully mandatory lobby register among the EU Member States, and attracted widespread attention due to its comprehensive scope. The drive to develop the legislation was strengthened by a number of public scandals in the country. The Irish Lobby Register presents an example which other Member States could follow, and might also be a source of inspiration for an EU system in transition. Its mandatory nature allows for a stricter approach, with investigations and sanctions available for non-compliance. Strict definitions enumerate those who fall under its scope, unlike the EU’s all-encompassing activity-based definition of interest representation. While financial information is not requested of registrants under the Irish system, returns are required three times a year and provide greater detail on all instances of lobbying activity carried out. Its scope is both broad and ambitious. As with any new legislation, the effectiveness of the new Irish system can only be measured in practice. The register has met with a positive start, registering a high uptake. A critical period is approaching, with the legislation to be reviewed in September 2016, one year after its commencement. The powers of investigation and sanctions under the Act will also come into force simultaneously.

Public consultation on the Transparency Register: Towards a mandatory Transparency Register for lobbyists

26-04-2016

Will the EU soon have a mandatory transparency register for lobbyists? After a long-standing call from the European Parliament, the European Commission launched a public consultation seeking input from stakeholders on the functioning of the current Transparency Register, which is run jointly by the Parliament and the Commission, and on a move towards a mandatory regime.

Will the EU soon have a mandatory transparency register for lobbyists? After a long-standing call from the European Parliament, the European Commission launched a public consultation seeking input from stakeholders on the functioning of the current Transparency Register, which is run jointly by the Parliament and the Commission, and on a move towards a mandatory regime.

EU-Transparenzregister

26-04-2016

Die Verbreitung des Lobbyismus in den EU-Organen hat Kritik in Bezug auf die Transparenz und Rechenschaftspflicht des EU-Entscheidungsprozesses hervorgerufen. Als Reaktion auf diese Bedenken führte das Parlament im Jahr 1995 das Transparenzregister ein, im Jahr 2008 folgte auch die Kommission diesem Beispiel. Im Jahr 2011 verschmolzen die beiden Organe ihre beiden Instrumente auf der Grundlage einer interinstitutionellen Vereinbarung (IIV) zu einem europäischen Transparenzregister (TR). Bisher hat ...

Die Verbreitung des Lobbyismus in den EU-Organen hat Kritik in Bezug auf die Transparenz und Rechenschaftspflicht des EU-Entscheidungsprozesses hervorgerufen. Als Reaktion auf diese Bedenken führte das Parlament im Jahr 1995 das Transparenzregister ein, im Jahr 2008 folgte auch die Kommission diesem Beispiel. Im Jahr 2011 verschmolzen die beiden Organe ihre beiden Instrumente auf der Grundlage einer interinstitutionellen Vereinbarung (IIV) zu einem europäischen Transparenzregister (TR). Bisher hat sich der Rat nur als Beobachter an dem System beteiligt. Das TR ist ein freiwilliges Registrierungssystem für Organisationen und Einzelpersonen, die unmittelbar oder mittelbar Einfluss auf den Entscheidungsprozess der EU nehmen möchten. Es verzeichnete einen Zuwachs von 1 000 Organisationen jährlich und umfasst heute über 9 500 Organisationen. Die tatsächliche Erfassung der Lobby-Organisationen durch das Register ist schwer zu schätzen, aus einer 2013 veröffentlichten wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung ging bereits hervor, dass das Register 60-75 % der Lobby-Organisationen auf EU-Ebene erfasst. In Übereinstimmung mit der IIV wurde das System 2013-2014 einer politischen Überprüfung unterzogen. Als Ergebnis dieser Überprüfung wurde im Januar 2015 ein neues, verbessertes Registrierungssystem eingeführt. Das Parlament fordert seit 2008 die Einführung eines obligatorischen Registers für bei den EU-Organen tätige Lobbyisten. Es verwies darauf, dass ein obligatorisches Register höhere Standards bei der Lobbytätigkeit und mehr Transparenz sicherstellen würde. Das Thema spielt eine zunehmende Rolle, vor allem seit der Kommissionspräsident Jean-Claude Juncker es auf die politische Agenda setzte und sich verpflichtete, entsprechend den Forderungen des Parlaments bis Ende 2016 einen Vorschlag für ein obligatorisches System vorzulegen. Außerdem veröffentlicht die Kommission seit dem 1. Dezember 2014 Informationen über Zusammenkünfte der Kommissionsmitglieder, der Mitglieder ihrer Kabinette und der Generaldirektoren mit Lobbyisten. Derzeit führt sie eine öffentliche Konsultation zu dem Vorschlag für ein verbindliches Register durch. Die Gesetze zur Regelung des Lobbyismus unterscheiden sich von Mitgliedstaat zu Mitgliedstaat. Nur in wenigen Ländern bestehen verbindliche Registrierungssysteme, wobei zuletzt in Irland eine entsprechende Regelung eingeführt wurde. Dies ist die aktualisierte Fassung eines im Dezember 2014 veröffentlichten Briefings.

EU-Transparenzregister

02-12-2014

Die zunehmende Lobby Tätigkeit in den EU-Organen hat Kritik in Bezug auf die Transparenz und Rechenschaftspflicht des EU-Entscheidungsprozesses hervorgerufen. Als Reaktion auf diese Bedenken führte das Parlament im Jahr 1995 das Transparenzregister ein, im Jahr 2008 folgte auch die Kommission diesem Beispiel. Im Jahr 2011 verschmolzen die beiden Organe ihre beiden Instrumente auf der Grundlage einer interinstitutionellen Vereinbarung (IIV) zu einem europäischen Transparenzregister (TR). Bisher hat ...

Die zunehmende Lobby Tätigkeit in den EU-Organen hat Kritik in Bezug auf die Transparenz und Rechenschaftspflicht des EU-Entscheidungsprozesses hervorgerufen. Als Reaktion auf diese Bedenken führte das Parlament im Jahr 1995 das Transparenzregister ein, im Jahr 2008 folgte auch die Kommission diesem Beispiel. Im Jahr 2011 verschmolzen die beiden Organe ihre beiden Instrumente auf der Grundlage einer interinstitutionellen Vereinbarung (IIV) zu einem europäischen Transparenzregister (TR). Bisher hat sich der Rat nur als Beobachter an dem System beteiligt. Das TR ist ein freiwilliges Registrierungssystem für Instanzen, die unmittelbar oder mittelbar Einfluss auf den Entscheidungsprozess der EU nehmen möchten. Es verzeichnete einen Zuwachs von 1000 Einträgen jährlich und umfasst heute über 7000 registrierten Organisationen. Die tatsächliche Erfassung der Lobby-Organisationen durch das Register ist schwer zu schätzen, aus einer kürzlich veröffentlichten wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung (2013) ging jedoch hervor, dass das Register 60-75 % der Lobby-Organisationen auf EU-Ebene erfasst. In Übereinstimmung mit der IIV wurde das System 2013-2014 einer politischen Überprüfung unterzogen. Als Ergebnis dieser Überprüfung wird im Januar 2015 ein neues, verbessertes Eintragungssystem eingeführt. Das Parlament fordert seit 2008 die Einführung eines obligatorischen Registers für Lobbyisten innerhalb der EU-Organe. Begründet wurde die Forderung dadurch, dass ein obligatorisches Register eine volle Einhaltung des Verhaltenskodexes vonseiten aller Lobbyisten sicherstellen würde. Das Thema spielt zunehmend eine Rolle, vor allem seit Kommissionspräsident Jean-Claude Juncker es auf die politische Agenda setzte und sich verpflichtete, entsprechend den Forderungen des Parlaments bis zum Jahr 2016 einen Vorschlag für ein obligatorisches System vorzulegen. Außerdem veröffentlicht die Kommission seit dem 1. Dezember 2014 Informationen über Zusammenkünfte der Kommissare, der Mitglieder ihrer Kabinette und der Generaldirektoren mit Lobbyisten. Die Gesetze zum Lobbyismus sind in den einzelnen Mitgliedstaaten sehr unterschiedlich. Obligatorische Registrierungssysteme gibt es nur in Litauen, Polen, Slowenien, Österreich und im Vereinigten Königreich. Das irische Parlament arbeitet derzeit an Rechtsvorschriften für die Einführung einer solchen Regelung. Freiwillige Eintragungssysteme gibt es in Deutschland, Frankreich und in den Niederlanden.

Anstehende Veranstaltungen

23-01-2020
'This is not Propaganda': Adventures in the War against Reality
Andere Veranstaltung -
EPRS
28-01-2020
Western Balkans: A rocky road to enlargement
Andere Veranstaltung -
EPRS

Partner

Bleiben Sie in Verbindung

email update imageAktuelle Informationen per E-Mail

Sie können sich per E-Mail aktuelle Mitteilungen über Personen und Ereignisse im Zusammenhang mit dem Europäischen Parlament zusenden lassen. Dazu zählen aktuelle Informationen der Mitglieder, der Informationsdienststellen oder des Think Tank.

Dieser Dienst kann auf der gesamten Website des Europäischen Parlaments genutzt werden. Sie können den Dienst abonnieren und Mitteilungen des Think Tank erhalten, indem Sie einfach Ihre E-Mail-Adresse angeben, ein Thema auswählen, zu dem Sie Informationen erhalten möchten, die Häufigkeit der Mitteilungen (täglich, wöchentlich oder monatlich) festlegen und abschließend zur Bestätigung auf den Link klicken, der Ihnen zu diesem Zweck per E-Mail geschickt wird.

RSS imageRSS-Feeds

Über den RSS-Feed bleiben Sie immer auf dem Laufenden und werden über alle Aktualisierungen auf der Website des Europäischen Parlaments informiert.

Klicken Sie auf den folgenden Link, um den RSS-Feed zu konfigurieren.