The future of the EU trade policy

26-06-2015

After years of relative stagnation and emphasis on multilateral negotiations (WTO), the European Union has instigated an impressive number of trade negotiations, some successfully concluded. The scene is currently dominated by negotiations with the US (TTIP) and Japan. The success of the current Commission will greatly depend on the outcome of these negotiations. The Union's trade strategy cannot be limited to the creation of new negotiation tables, but must also ensure the proper implementation of negotiated agreements and combat the rise of new non-tariff barriers. The European Union and its bodies must also be able to convince civil society that its actions are correct and secure the solid support of Member States and public opinion for the new international agreements which will gradually come into force. This significant objective can only be achieved if the Union's trade policy is able to incorporate the aspirations of European citizens and provide coherent responses, based on the ongoing and unconditional defence of the common interest. Obviously, this objective does not merely involve the Commission, but calls for a proactive and credible contribution from the European Parliament and the Council.

After years of relative stagnation and emphasis on multilateral negotiations (WTO), the European Union has instigated an impressive number of trade negotiations, some successfully concluded. The scene is currently dominated by negotiations with the US (TTIP) and Japan. The success of the current Commission will greatly depend on the outcome of these negotiations. The Union's trade strategy cannot be limited to the creation of new negotiation tables, but must also ensure the proper implementation of negotiated agreements and combat the rise of new non-tariff barriers. The European Union and its bodies must also be able to convince civil society that its actions are correct and secure the solid support of Member States and public opinion for the new international agreements which will gradually come into force. This significant objective can only be achieved if the Union's trade policy is able to incorporate the aspirations of European citizens and provide coherent responses, based on the ongoing and unconditional defence of the common interest. Obviously, this objective does not merely involve the Commission, but calls for a proactive and credible contribution from the European Parliament and the Council.