34

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

Escalating US-Iran conflict: The EU's priorities

16-01-2020

On 3 January 2020, a United States (US) strike outside Baghdad killed Iranian General Qasem Soleimani, the leader of the al-Qods force within the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IGRC), and arguably the second most important man in Iran after Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The assassination was a reaction to an escalation in the growing conflict between the USA and Iran. Iran retaliated on 8 January 2020, by attacking two US bases in Iraq with missiles; luckily – or intentionally – without ...

On 3 January 2020, a United States (US) strike outside Baghdad killed Iranian General Qasem Soleimani, the leader of the al-Qods force within the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IGRC), and arguably the second most important man in Iran after Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The assassination was a reaction to an escalation in the growing conflict between the USA and Iran. Iran retaliated on 8 January 2020, by attacking two US bases in Iraq with missiles; luckily – or intentionally – without casualties. Although both the USA and Iran have refrained from any further action, few expect this to mark the end of tensions between the USA and Iran in the region. The EU reaction to the assassination has been to try to de-escalate the situation to prevent all-out war, to focus on stabilising Iraq, and to limit damage to the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

A new neighbourhood, development and international cooperation instrument

29-11-2019

In the context of the Commission's proposal for a multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, on 14 June 2018 the Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), with a proposed budget of €89.2 billion (in current prices). Parliament adopted its first-reading position in plenary on 27 March 2019. MEPs agreed to accept a single instrument, but called for a stronger role for Parliament ...

In the context of the Commission's proposal for a multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, on 14 June 2018 the Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), with a proposed budget of €89.2 billion (in current prices). Parliament adopted its first-reading position in plenary on 27 March 2019. MEPs agreed to accept a single instrument, but called for a stronger role for Parliament on secondary policy choices, through delegated acts, and for the budget for the instrument to be increased by nearly €4 billion, to €93.154 billion. MEPs also specifically called for an increase in the funds allocated to human rights and democracy activities, the percentage of funding that fulfils the criteria for official development assistance, and funds that support climate and environmental objectives. Moreover, Parliament's amendments include the introduction of gender mainstreaming targets, the earmarking of certain financial allocations, the suspension of assistance in case of human rights violations, and the reduction of the emerging challenges and priorities cushion to €7 billion. The Council adopted a partial mandate on 13 June 2019, and an additional mandate – on the European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD+) – on 25 September 2019. Following the committees' decision of 8 October 2019 to enter into interinstitutional negotiations on the basis of Parliament's first-reading position, a first trilogue meeting took place on 23 October 2019. The second is scheduled for 5 December 2019. Fourth edition. The 'Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Review of dual-use export controls

26-11-2019

Certain goods and technologies have legitimate civilian applications but can also be used for military purposes; so-called 'dual-use' goods are subject to the European Union's export control regime. The regime is now being revised, mainly to take account of significant technological developments and to create a more level playing field among EU Member States. The proposed regulation would recast the regulation in force since 2009. Among other elements, the proposal seeks to introduce an 'autonomous ...

Certain goods and technologies have legitimate civilian applications but can also be used for military purposes; so-called 'dual-use' goods are subject to the European Union's export control regime. The regime is now being revised, mainly to take account of significant technological developments and to create a more level playing field among EU Member States. The proposed regulation would recast the regulation in force since 2009. Among other elements, the proposal seeks to introduce an 'autonomous' EU list for cyber-surveillance technology featuring items that are not (yet) subject to multilateral export control. Moreover, the proposal seeks to introduce human rights violations as an explicit justification for export control. Stakeholders are divided over the incorporation of human rights considerations, with the technology industry particularly concerned that it might lose out to non-European competitors. On 17 January 2018, based on the INTA committee's report on the legislative proposal, the European Parliament adopted its position for trilogue negotiations. For its part, the Council adopted its negotiating mandate on 5 June 2019, and on the basis of this mandate, the Council Presidency began negotiations with the European Parliament's delegation on 21 October 2019. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

The European Parliament's evolving soft power - From back-door diplomacy to agenda-setting: Democracy support and mediation

27-09-2019

For the past 40 years, Members of the European Parliament have been working at boosting Parliament's role in EU foreign policy. These efforts have continued to be stepped up since the launch of the common foreign and security policy (CFSP) in 1993. Over recent decades, the European Parliament has significantly raised its profile as a credible moral force with strong focus on strengthening human rights, supporting democracy and enhancing the rule of law worldwide. Perhaps less visible than the European ...

For the past 40 years, Members of the European Parliament have been working at boosting Parliament's role in EU foreign policy. These efforts have continued to be stepped up since the launch of the common foreign and security policy (CFSP) in 1993. Over recent decades, the European Parliament has significantly raised its profile as a credible moral force with strong focus on strengthening human rights, supporting democracy and enhancing the rule of law worldwide. Perhaps less visible than the European Parliament's Sakharov Prize for freedom of thought, the European Parliament's democracy support activities are part of its 'soft-power' approach to international relations. Moreover, Parliament can convey messages through channels that are different from, and complementary to, those employed by the EU's traditional diplomatic players; for example, through its parliamentary networks. Parliament also enjoys Treaty-based information and consultation rights, which allow its Members to shape the EU's external policies. In addition, the European Parliament has become a public forum for debating with representatives of partner countries and international organisations, as well as influential non-state actors. MEPs pro-actively engage in inter-parliamentary delegations and missions to third countries as well as joint parliamentary assemblies. Moreover, parties in different countries often share strong links via their political families.

Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens: La lutte contre le terrorisme

28-06-2019

Confrontée à la menace croissante du terrorisme international, l’Union européenne joue un rôle toujours plus ambitieux dans la lutte contre le terrorisme. Si la responsabilité en matière de lutte contre la criminalité et de sécurité incombe en premier lieu aux États membres, l’Union offre des instruments de coopération, de coordination et (dans une certaine mesure) d’harmonisation, ainsi qu’un soutien financier, pour faire face à un phénomène qui ne connaît pas de frontières. Par ailleurs, l’hypothèse ...

Confrontée à la menace croissante du terrorisme international, l’Union européenne joue un rôle toujours plus ambitieux dans la lutte contre le terrorisme. Si la responsabilité en matière de lutte contre la criminalité et de sécurité incombe en premier lieu aux États membres, l’Union offre des instruments de coopération, de coordination et (dans une certaine mesure) d’harmonisation, ainsi qu’un soutien financier, pour faire face à un phénomène qui ne connaît pas de frontières. Par ailleurs, l’hypothèse selon laquelle il existe un lien entre le développement et la stabilité, ainsi qu’entre la sécurité intérieure et la sécurité extérieure, dicte désormais l’action de l’Union au-delà de ses propres frontières. Les dépenses de l’Union dans le domaine de la lutte contre le terrorisme ont augmenté au fil des années et sont appelées à croître à l’avenir en vue d’améliorer la coopération entre les autorités répressives nationales et de renforcer le soutien fourni par les organes de l’Union responsables de la sécurité, tels que l’Agence de l’Union européenne pour la coopération des services répressifs (Europol) et l’Agence de l’Union européenne pour la gestion opérationnelle des systèmes d’information à grande échelle au sein de l’espace de liberté, de sécurité et de justice (eu-LISA). Les fonds alloués à la coopération avec les pays tiers ont également été revus à la hausse, y compris au moyen de l’instrument contribuant à la stabilité et à la paix. L’objet des nombreux instruments et règles adoptés depuis 2014 va de l’harmonisation des définitions des infractions terroristes et des peines y afférentes à l’échange d’informations et de données, en passant par la protection des frontières, le financement de la lutte contre le terrorisme et l’adoption d’une réglementation sur les armes à feu. Pour évaluer l’efficacité des outils existants et mettre en évidence les lacunes et les éventuelles voies à suivre, le Parlement européen a mis en place une commission spéciale sur le terrorisme (TERR), qui a rendu son rapport en novembre 2018. La commission TERR a formulé des recommandations poussées invitant à prendre des mesures immédiates ou à plus long terme pour prévenir le terrorisme, s’attaquer à ses causes profondes, protéger les citoyens de l’Union et aider les victimes du mieux qui soit. Conformément à ces recommandations, les actions de l’Union en matière de lutte contre le terrorisme privilégieront très probablement la réponse aux menaces actuelles et futures, la lutte contre la radicalisation, y compris par la prévention de la diffusion de la propagande terroriste sur l’internet, ainsi que l’amélioration de la résilience des infrastructures critiques. Parmi les évolutions prévisibles figurent également l’intensification de l’échange d’informations, qui va de pair avec l’interopérabilité programmée des bases de données de l’Union liées à la sécurité et aux frontières, ainsi qu’avec la réalisation d’enquêtes sur les attaques terroristes commises sur le territoire de l’Union et la poursuite en justice de leurs auteurs, grâce à l’extension proposée du mandat du Parquet européen récemment créé. Le présent document est une mise à jour d’une note plus ancienne, publiée avant les élections européennes de 2019.

Accord de coopération UE-Afghanistan

06-03-2019

L’accord de coopération en matière de partenariat et de développement entre l’Union européenne et l’Afghanistan a été signé par l’Union et l’Afghanistan en février 2017. Cet accord représente la première relation contractuelle entre l’Union européenne et l’Afghanistan et établit le cadre juridique de la coopération UE Afghanistan. L’entrée en vigueur pleine et entière de cet accord mixte est soumise à l’approbation du Parlement européen ainsi qu’à la ratification par les parlements nationaux et certains ...

L’accord de coopération en matière de partenariat et de développement entre l’Union européenne et l’Afghanistan a été signé par l’Union et l’Afghanistan en février 2017. Cet accord représente la première relation contractuelle entre l’Union européenne et l’Afghanistan et établit le cadre juridique de la coopération UE Afghanistan. L’entrée en vigueur pleine et entière de cet accord mixte est soumise à l’approbation du Parlement européen ainsi qu’à la ratification par les parlements nationaux et certains parlements régionaux des États membres de l’Union. Le Parlement européen devrait se prononcer sur l’approbation du projet de décision du Conseil en vue de la conclusion de l’accord lors de sa session plénière de mars I.

The first EU-Arab League summit: A new step in EU-Arab relations

22-02-2019

On 24 and 25 February 2019, heads of state or government from the European Union (EU) and the League of Arab States (LAS) will meet in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, for the first-ever EU-LAS summit. The summit comes at a time of heightened EU interest in developing closer cooperation with its main regional counterpart in the Arab world. The meeting will be co-chaired by Egyptian President, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, and European Council President, Donald Tusk, who will represent the EU alongside European Commission ...

On 24 and 25 February 2019, heads of state or government from the European Union (EU) and the League of Arab States (LAS) will meet in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, for the first-ever EU-LAS summit. The summit comes at a time of heightened EU interest in developing closer cooperation with its main regional counterpart in the Arab world. The meeting will be co-chaired by Egyptian President, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, and European Council President, Donald Tusk, who will represent the EU alongside European Commission President, Jean-Claude Juncker. A large number of EU and LAS heads of state or government have confirmed their attendance. A wide range of issues and common challenges will be on the agenda, including multilateralism, trade, investment and economic cooperation, technology, migration, climate change, security and the situation in the region. Since 2011, EU-LAS meetings have been taking place regularly at different levels in the context of a political and strategic dialogue. The most recent ministerial meeting, which brought together 10 EU and 15 Arab League foreign ministers, took place in Brussels on 4 February 2019. Moreover, working groups have been gathering in between meetings of senior officials to discuss political and security matters of shared concern. The EU and the LAS share positions on a range of issues, including support for a political transition in Syria, the two-state solution under the Middle East peace process, and the recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of both Israel and a future Palestinian state. The two partners also cooperate to find solutions to the war in Yemen and the conflict in Libya. The summit is taking place at a time of intensified talks with Egypt and other North African countries to address the issue of migration. It is also seen as part of a broader effort to build closer ties with Africa. In September 2018, Commission President Juncker urged the EU to strike a new alliance with Africa to boost investment and create millions of jobs. The EU holds regular summits with other regional players, including the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and the African Union (AU).

Nuclear Safety outside the EU: Proposal for a new Council regulation

20-02-2019

In the context of the Commission's proposal for a multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, the Commission published a proposal for a Council regulation establishing a European instrument for nuclear safety complementing the neighbourhood, development and international cooperation instrument on the basis of the Euratom Treaty on 14 June 2018. The proposed regulation will replace Council Regulation (Euratom) No 237/2014 of 13 December 2013 establishing an instrument for nuclear ...

In the context of the Commission's proposal for a multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, the Commission published a proposal for a Council regulation establishing a European instrument for nuclear safety complementing the neighbourhood, development and international cooperation instrument on the basis of the Euratom Treaty on 14 June 2018. The proposed regulation will replace Council Regulation (Euratom) No 237/2014 of 13 December 2013 establishing an instrument for nuclear safety cooperation (INSC). The proposed regulation will continue to fund the important activities carried out under the current regulation, namely to support the promotion of a high level of nuclear safety and radiation protection and the application of effective and efficient safeguards of nuclear materials in third countries, building on the activities under the Euratom Treaty. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The end of the INF Treaty? A pillar of European security architecture at risk

04-02-2019

The US administration announced on 1 February 2019 that it was suspending its obligations under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, with effect from 2 February 2019, and that it was giving Russia six months' notice of complete withdrawal. Russia reacted by announcing that it was also suspending its obligations under the Treaty. Both parties said they would begin developing new nuclear-capable missiles banned by the treaty. The 1987 INF Treaty is a landmark nuclear-arms-control treaty ...

The US administration announced on 1 February 2019 that it was suspending its obligations under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, with effect from 2 February 2019, and that it was giving Russia six months' notice of complete withdrawal. Russia reacted by announcing that it was also suspending its obligations under the Treaty. Both parties said they would begin developing new nuclear-capable missiles banned by the treaty. The 1987 INF Treaty is a landmark nuclear-arms-control treaty between the United States (US) and the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) that eliminated and prohibited ground-launched intermediate ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges between 500 and 5 500 km. The US announcement follows years of allegations that the Russian Federation has acted in breach of the agreement. Russia, for its part, has also accused the US of violating the treaty. Both deny the allegations. Moreover, both parties consider that the agreement puts their countries at a strategic disadvantage vis-à-vis other nuclear powers, especially China. The parties' announcements undermine a cornerstone of the European security order. The signing of the INF Treaty in 1987 led to the removal and destruction of nearly 3 000 US and Soviet short-, medium- and intermediate-range nuclear-capable missiles stationed in or aimed at Europe. The EU has called on the US to consider the consequences of its possible withdrawal from the INF for its own security, the security of its allies and that of the whole world. The EU has also called on both the US and Russia to remain engaged in constructive dialogue to preserve the INF Treaty, and on Russia to address the serious concerns regarding its compliance with the treaty. NATO considers Russia to be in violation of the INF Treaty, and the alliance has called on Russia to return urgently to full and verifiable compliance with the agreement. Any redeployment of intermediate-range missiles will put Europe once more in the line of fire of strategic nuclear weapons. If the INF Treaty is abrogated, Europeans will be faced with stark choices all carrying inherent security risks, including engaging in a deployment race with Russia, or refusing re-deployment of US missiles on European soil, potentially leaving European countries exposed to Russian intimidation. Efforts over the next six months will focus on preserving the INF Treaty against all odds.

Réglementation de l’Union européenne sur le contrôle des exportations d’armements

07-11-2018

La position commune de l’Union sur les exportations d’armements constitue la seule disposition juridique contraignante à l’échelle régionale sur les exportations d’armes classiques. Si la position commune a renforcé l’échange d’informations et la transparence en matière d’exportations d’armements par les États membres, il est encore néanmoins possible de faire converger davantage les politiques nationales et d’appliquer plus rigoureusement les critères définis dans la position commune. À la suite ...

La position commune de l’Union sur les exportations d’armements constitue la seule disposition juridique contraignante à l’échelle régionale sur les exportations d’armes classiques. Si la position commune a renforcé l’échange d’informations et la transparence en matière d’exportations d’armements par les États membres, il est encore néanmoins possible de faire converger davantage les politiques nationales et d’appliquer plus rigoureusement les critères définis dans la position commune. À la suite de la publication, en février 2018, du 19e rapport annuel de l’UE sur les exportations d’armes, le Parlement européen doit examiner un rapport sur la mise en œuvre de la position commune au cours de la première période de session de novembre (novembre I).

Evénements à venir

21-01-2020
Outlook for the MENA Region: What future for stabilisation and reconstruction?
Autre événement -
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