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Employment barriers in border regions: Strategies and EU funding

15-01-2019

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways ...

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways to facilitate cross-border labour mobility going forward. This analysis has been produced by Policy Department A at request of the EMPL Committee to feed into its work on the European Social Fund Plus.

Údar seachtarach

Vanessa Ludden, Angeli Jeyarajah

Societal costs of “Fake news” in the Digital Single Market

14-12-2018

This in-depth analysis explores the mechanisms of “fake news” and its societal costs in the Digital Single Market. It describes the risks to the integrity of information and to the integrity of elections. It highlights the roles of the various actors involved in the production and amplification of such information disorders. Finally, it outlines responses that are being tested in different parts of Europe to deal with the issue. The document has been provided by Policy Department A at the request ...

This in-depth analysis explores the mechanisms of “fake news” and its societal costs in the Digital Single Market. It describes the risks to the integrity of information and to the integrity of elections. It highlights the roles of the various actors involved in the production and amplification of such information disorders. Finally, it outlines responses that are being tested in different parts of Europe to deal with the issue. The document has been provided by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

Údar seachtarach

Prof. Dr. Divina Frau-Meigs

Research for TRAN Committee - Overtourism: impact and possible policy responses

15-10-2018

This study addresses the complex phenomenon of overtourism in the EU. By focusing on a set of case studies, the study reports on overtourism indicators, discusses management approaches implemented within different destinations and assesses policy responses. It concludes that a common set of indicators cannot be defined because of the complex causes and effects of overtourism. Avoiding overtourism requires custom-made policies in cooperation between destinations' stakeholders and policymakers.

This study addresses the complex phenomenon of overtourism in the EU. By focusing on a set of case studies, the study reports on overtourism indicators, discusses management approaches implemented within different destinations and assesses policy responses. It concludes that a common set of indicators cannot be defined because of the complex causes and effects of overtourism. Avoiding overtourism requires custom-made policies in cooperation between destinations' stakeholders and policymakers.

Údar seachtarach

Paul PEETERS, Stefan GÖSSLING, Jeroen KLIJS, Claudio MILANO, Marina NOVELLI, Corné DIJKMANS, Eke EIJGELAAR, Stefan HARTMAN, Jasper HESLINGA, Rami ISAAC, Ondrej MITAS, Simone MORETTI, Jeroen NAWIJN, Bernadett PAPP and Albert POSTMA

Foreign influence operations in the EU

10-07-2018

Attempting to influence political decision-making beyond one's own political sphere is not a new phenomenon – it is an integral part of the history of geopolitics. Whereas hard power relies on military and economic force, the soft power of a state involves public diplomacy and dialogue on values, cultures and ideas, which should normally correspond with its behaviour abroad. Although the extent is hard to measure, democratic states whose values match the prevailing global norms – pluralism, fundamental ...

Attempting to influence political decision-making beyond one's own political sphere is not a new phenomenon – it is an integral part of the history of geopolitics. Whereas hard power relies on military and economic force, the soft power of a state involves public diplomacy and dialogue on values, cultures and ideas, which should normally correspond with its behaviour abroad. Although the extent is hard to measure, democratic states whose values match the prevailing global norms – pluralism, fundamental rights and freedoms, the rule of law as a principle within states and in international relations – and exert this influence by contributing to the prevention and resolution of conflicts, traditionally appear more attractive, thus having more soft power leverage. However, influence can also serve purposes of interference and destabilisation. Authoritarian state actors struggle to project soft power while engaging in disruptive or destructive behaviour. Instead, some state actors see a means of reaching their goals by making democratic actors, systems and values appear less attractive, through a number of overt and covert instruments. The tools are constantly evolving. Today, social media combines the oral tradition with new electronic means of dissemination, enabling (potentially disruptive) messages to spread instantaneously. Disinformation can be, and is being, combined with other instruments in an increasingly diverse, hybrid 'toolbox' that authoritarian state actors have at their disposal. In recent years, awareness in the research community of online disinformation by state actors has increased around the world, not least in the context of the United Kingdom referendum on EU membership and the US presidential election in 2016. Although their visibility increases in the context of elections and referendums, influence campaigns are not limited to democratic processes.

LIBE legislative mapping - Systematic overview of EU legislation on Civil liberties, Justice and Home affairs

28-08-2017

The European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs is developing the LIBE Legislative Mapping Project, in cooperation with the Secretariat of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE). This long-term project consists of a comprehensive up-to-date overview of existing and emerging EU legislation and related information in the field of justice and home affairs (JHA) in the form of an online tool for MEPs and their staff.

The European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs is developing the LIBE Legislative Mapping Project, in cooperation with the Secretariat of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE). This long-term project consists of a comprehensive up-to-date overview of existing and emerging EU legislation and related information in the field of justice and home affairs (JHA) in the form of an online tool for MEPs and their staff.

Democratic Accountability and Budgetary Control of Non-Governmental Organisations Funded by the EU Budget

30-01-2017

This study follows up on a 2010 European Parliament study, ‘Financing of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) from the EU budget’. Difficulties identified in that study relating to fragmented European Commission systems still exist today. This constrains policy analysis and transparency and accountability. The existence of multiple, complex, overlapping NGO networks presents significant challenges to accountability and transparency, as does the emergence of new and innovative funding mechanisms that ...

This study follows up on a 2010 European Parliament study, ‘Financing of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) from the EU budget’. Difficulties identified in that study relating to fragmented European Commission systems still exist today. This constrains policy analysis and transparency and accountability. The existence of multiple, complex, overlapping NGO networks presents significant challenges to accountability and transparency, as does the emergence of new and innovative funding mechanisms that do not involve large institutional donors.

Údar seachtarach

Roderick Ackermann, Elsa Perreau and Malin Carlberg (Blomeyer & Sanz Ltd.)

Tourism and the sharing economy

23-01-2017

Tourism services have traditionally been provided by businesses such as hotels, taxis or tour operators. Recently, a growing number of individuals are proposing to share temporarily with tourists what they own (for example their house or car) or what they do (for example meals or excursions). This type of sharing is referred to as the 'sharing economy'. It is not limited to tourism and can be found in many areas of social and economic activity, although tourism has been one of the sectors most impacted ...

Tourism services have traditionally been provided by businesses such as hotels, taxis or tour operators. Recently, a growing number of individuals are proposing to share temporarily with tourists what they own (for example their house or car) or what they do (for example meals or excursions). This type of sharing is referred to as the 'sharing economy'. It is not limited to tourism and can be found in many areas of social and economic activity, although tourism has been one of the sectors most impacted. Sharing goods and services between individuals is nothing new in itself. However, the development of the internet and, as a consequence, the creation of online platforms have made sharing easier than ever. In the past decade, many companies managing such platforms have emerged on the market. A well-known example is a platform on which people can book accommodation (Airbnb). The sharing economy has had a positive impact on tourism as well as a negative one. Its advocates think that it provides easy access to a wide range of services that are often of higher quality and more affordable than those provided by traditional business counterparts. Critics, on the other hand, claim that the sharing economy provides unfair competition, reduces job security, avoids taxes and poses a threat to safety, health and disability compliance standards. The response to the sharing economy remains fragmented in the EU. Some activities or aspects have been regulated at national, regional or local level. In June 2016, the European Commission published a communication on a European agenda for the collaborative economy, to offer some clarification on relevant EU rules and provide public authorities with policy guidance. The European Parliament and advisory committees have also touched upon the issue in various resolutions and opinions. This is an updated edition of a briefing from September 2015.

Volunteering in the EU

19-10-2016

Volunteering is a core expression of civic participation. Over the last 20 years, some 100 000 young people have taken part in international volunteering through the European Voluntary Service, thus contributing to sectors as varied and diverse as education, youth, culture, sport, environment, health, social care, consumer protection, humanitarian aid, development policy, research, equal opportunities and external relations.

Volunteering is a core expression of civic participation. Over the last 20 years, some 100 000 young people have taken part in international volunteering through the European Voluntary Service, thus contributing to sectors as varied and diverse as education, youth, culture, sport, environment, health, social care, consumer protection, humanitarian aid, development policy, research, equal opportunities and external relations.

International Marriage Brokers and Mail Order Brides - Analysing the Need for Regulation

14-10-2016

The study was requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality and commissioned, overseen and published by the Policy Department for Citizen’s Rights and Constitutional Affairs. This Study analyses the socio-legal status of the Mail-Order Bride industry in the EU, in terms of regulation, protection of rights, and the consequences of Mail-Order Bride relationships for women, men and children involved. It focuses on the United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands ...

The study was requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality and commissioned, overseen and published by the Policy Department for Citizen’s Rights and Constitutional Affairs. This Study analyses the socio-legal status of the Mail-Order Bride industry in the EU, in terms of regulation, protection of rights, and the consequences of Mail-Order Bride relationships for women, men and children involved. It focuses on the United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands and Ireland; defines the Mail-Order Bride (MOB) phenomenon. The report uses a combination of sociological and legal research methods including desk research, expert interviews and a mapping of International Marriage Broker (IMB) websites. It finds that it is difficult to distinguish between MOB and other groups of female marriage migrants. The report identifies three main legal gaps, namely the lack of regulation of IMB activities, the lack of a harmonized regime for family reunification, and the lack of harmonized protective measures for women in case of relationship break up. There is a need for additional prevention and protection measures, since female marriage migrants are considered particularly vulnerable to domestic violence.

Údar seachtarach

Julia REINOLD (Maastricht Graduate School of Governance | UNU-MERIT), Inez ROOSEN (Maastricht Graduate School of Governance | UNU-MERIT), Alexander HOOGENBOOM (Maastricht University), Ingrid WESTENDORP (Maastricht University) and Katharina KOCK (Maastricht Graduate School of Governance | UNU-MERIT)

The Situation of Workers in the Collaborative Economy

04-10-2016

The collaborative economy (or “platform economy”), encompassing work-on-demand via apps like Uber and crowdwork like Amazon Mechanical Turk, has grown exponentially in recent years, thanks to the development of high-speed networks, the exploitation of big data and the availability of mobile devices, which have cut down transaction costs and allow for real-time effective matching of supply and demand. While creating many new opportunities for digital and physical services, which have, thanks to lower ...

The collaborative economy (or “platform economy”), encompassing work-on-demand via apps like Uber and crowdwork like Amazon Mechanical Turk, has grown exponentially in recent years, thanks to the development of high-speed networks, the exploitation of big data and the availability of mobile devices, which have cut down transaction costs and allow for real-time effective matching of supply and demand. While creating many new opportunities for digital and physical services, which have, thanks to lower costs as compared to established operators, rather expanded the market for services instead of crowding out the incumbents, this new digitally based economy has also raised questions on the situation of workers. As this literature review shows, their legal status (either as employees or self-employed) is often unclear, and negative effects on the labour market can be witnessed (such as missing social protection, low remuneration of work, questionable work-life balance and more). Many of these effects are due to the functioning of the digital economy, which relies on micro-tasks, trust-inducing mechanisms as ratings and - at times opaque - algorithms. The literature review also presents policy solutions as discussed in recent literature.

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

28-01-2020
Western Balkans: A rocky road to enlargement
Imeacht eile -
EPRS
29-01-2020
Where all students can succeed: Analysing the latest OECD PISA results
Imeacht eile -
EPRS
29-01-2020
The Future of Artificial Intelligence for Europe
Ceardlann -
STOA

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