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New EU rules on labelling of tyres

21-03-2019

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The proposed regulation would increase consumer awareness of the tyre label and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display ...

On 17 May 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a new regulation on the labelling of tyres for the purposes of fuel efficiency, safety, and noise reduction. This would replace the 2009 Tyre Labelling Regulation (TLR), while maintaining and reinforcing most of its key provisions. The proposed regulation would increase consumer awareness of the tyre label and improve market surveillance and enforcement of TLR provisions across the EU Member States. Suppliers would be obliged to display the tyre label in all forms of purchase, including where the tyre is not physically shown in the store and where it is sold online or on a long-distance basis. Whereas the tyre label is currently applicable to passenger and light-duty vehicles, in future it would also apply to heavy-duty vehicles. The new label would include visual information on tyre performance in snow or ice conditions, and could be adjusted by means of delegated acts to include information on mileage, abrasion or re-studded tyres. From 2020, all tyre labels would be included in the product registration database being set up as part of the revised EU framework for energy efficiency labelling. Whereas the Council finalised its position on 4 March 2019, the Parliament is expected to vote on its first-reading position, on the basis of the ITRE committee’s report, during the March II plenary session.

Revised Energy Efficiency Directive

16-01-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a proposal for a revised Energy Efficiency Directive, as part of the Clean Energy package. This aims to adapt and align EU energy legislation with the 2030 energy and climate goals, and contribute towards delivering the energy union strategy. The Commission initially proposed a 30 % binding EU energy efficiency target for 2030, to be achieved by means of indicative national targets and the extension beyond 2020 of the energy savings obligation scheme, which currently requires utility companies to help their consumers use 1.5 % less energy each year. The Commission proposal also aims to make the rules on energy metering and billing clearer for consumers. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement among the EU Institutions on 19 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018). It was published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Member States are required to transpose most of the revised directive by 25 June 2020, although the provisions on metering and billing can be transposed by 25 October 2020. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Improving energy performance of buildings

19-07-2018

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a ‘clean energy’ package to help the EU meet its 2030 energy and climate goals, including a targeted revision of the 2010 Directive on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD). The Commission proposed to leave intact the main features of the existing EPBD, modernise and streamline some requirements, introduce binding obligations on electro-mobility requirements in buildings, introduce a ‘smartness indicator’ that assesses the technological capability ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a ‘clean energy’ package to help the EU meet its 2030 energy and climate goals, including a targeted revision of the 2010 Directive on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD). The Commission proposed to leave intact the main features of the existing EPBD, modernise and streamline some requirements, introduce binding obligations on electro-mobility requirements in buildings, introduce a ‘smartness indicator’ that assesses the technological capability of buildings in energy self-production and consumption, and set clearer requirements for national databases on energy performance certificates. The Council adopted a general approach in June 2017. In Parliament the ITRE committee adopted its report in October 2017. After three rounds of trilogue negotiations, a provisional agreement was reached on 19 December 2017. After formal adoption by Parliament and Council in spring 2018, the revised EPBD was signed into law on 30 May 2018 and entered into force on 9 July 2018. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Clean energy in the European Union

11-01-2018

In November 2016, the Commission adopted the clean energy package, of eight legislative proposals on energy efficiency, renewables, electricity markets and governance. During the January plenary session, Parliament will vote on three reports relating to the package: a revised energy efficiency directive, a recast directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources, and a new regulation on governance of the energy union. The aim is to gain a mandate for trilogue negotiations on all three.

In November 2016, the Commission adopted the clean energy package, of eight legislative proposals on energy efficiency, renewables, electricity markets and governance. During the January plenary session, Parliament will vote on three reports relating to the package: a revised energy efficiency directive, a recast directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources, and a new regulation on governance of the energy union. The aim is to gain a mandate for trilogue negotiations on all three.

The Ecodesign Directive (2009/125/EC)

24-11-2017

This European Implementation Assessment (EIA) has been provided to accompany the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety in scrutinising the implementation of the directive establishing a framework for the setting of ecodesign requirements for energy-related products ('Ecodesign Directive'). The EIA consists of an opening analysis and two briefing papers. The opening analysis, prepared in-house by the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit within EPRS, situates ...

This European Implementation Assessment (EIA) has been provided to accompany the work of the European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety in scrutinising the implementation of the directive establishing a framework for the setting of ecodesign requirements for energy-related products ('Ecodesign Directive'). The EIA consists of an opening analysis and two briefing papers. The opening analysis, prepared in-house by the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit within EPRS, situates the directive in the EU policy context, provides key information on implementation of the directive and presents opinions of selected stakeholders on implementation. The paper contains also short overview of consumers' opinions and behaviour. Input to the assessment was received from CPMC SPRL and from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, both in the form of briefing papers: – the first paper gathers the opinions of EU-level and national stakeholders on successes in, failures of and challenges to the implementation of the directive and the underlying reasons. Experts from seven Member States were interviewed: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the United Kingdom, Poland, Portugal and Finland. These interviews are complemented by a literature review of available studies, reports and position papers; – the second paper is based on three elements. The first part presents an analysis of the Ecodesign Directive, ecodesign working plans and related regulations, the second is based on an analysis of the scientific articles discussing the application of the directive to specific product groups and the third presents the results of the on-line surveys evaluating the application of the regulations of the directive for selected product groups.

EU summer-time arrangements under Directive 2000/84/EC: Ex-post Impact Assessment

25-10-2017

The purpose of summer time is to capitalise on natural daylight. By turning the clock one hour forward as the days get longer in spring, sunset is delayed by this same hour, until the clock is set back again in autumn. This practice is applied in over 60 countries worldwide. In the EU, Member States draw on a long tradition of daylight saving time (DST), and many have developed their own DST schemes. Harmonisation attempts began in the 1970s, to facilitate the effective operation of the internal ...

The purpose of summer time is to capitalise on natural daylight. By turning the clock one hour forward as the days get longer in spring, sunset is delayed by this same hour, until the clock is set back again in autumn. This practice is applied in over 60 countries worldwide. In the EU, Member States draw on a long tradition of daylight saving time (DST), and many have developed their own DST schemes. Harmonisation attempts began in the 1970s, to facilitate the effective operation of the internal market. Today, the uniform EU-wide application of DST is governed by Directive 2000/84/EC; most European third countries have aligned their summer-time schemes with that of the EU. Much academic research has been invested in examining the benefits and inconveniences of DST. It appears that: - summer time benefits the internal market (notably the transport sector) and outdoor leisure activities, and it also generates marginal savings in energy consumption; - the impact on other economic sectors remains largely inconclusive; - with regard to inconveniences, health research associates DST with disruption to the human biorhythm ('circadian rhythm').

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

27-07-2017

In July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. The rescaling of different types of household products would be done ...

In July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. The rescaling of different types of household products would be done through delegated acts from the Commission. While the proposal is supported by consumer and environmental groups, industry groups are concerned that a major change in energy labelling could have a negative impact on both producers and consumers, acting as a disincentive to greater energy efficiency. The Council adopted a general approach in November 2015. The Parliament approved a series of legislative amendments in July 2016. After several trilogue meetings, a provisional agreement was reached in March 2017. The agreed text was subsequently approved by the Parliament on 13 June and by the Council on 26 June 2017. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of February 2017: PE 599.282.

Use of energy from renewable sources

26-06-2017

Despite its considerable length and a rather large number of options (over 30), the IA report could have delivered a more coherent, comprehensive, and persuasive analysis. The internal logic of the report and the arrangement of options is at times hard to understand because the options are linked to challenges rather than to clearly defined problems and objectives. Furthermore, the absence of preferred options makes it difficult to assess the usefulness of the impact assessment in informing the political ...

Despite its considerable length and a rather large number of options (over 30), the IA report could have delivered a more coherent, comprehensive, and persuasive analysis. The internal logic of the report and the arrangement of options is at times hard to understand because the options are linked to challenges rather than to clearly defined problems and objectives. Furthermore, the absence of preferred options makes it difficult to assess the usefulness of the impact assessment in informing the political decisions underpinning the legislative proposal. The use of different models, which are by the Commission's own admittance very difficult to compare, may have led to a certain lack of coherence in the assessment of the impacts. The proportionality of proposed measures is not always clearly visible compared with the evidence provided by the models used in the assessment. Overall, given the number of considerable shortcomings and the fact that the assessment twice received a negative opinion from the RSB, one might have expected a better argumentation for the Commission's decision to proceed with the proposal.

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

07-06-2017

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a regulation on energy labelling that would replace and repeal the 2010 directive on the subject. The Parliament proposed a series of amendments in July 2016, setting the stage for interinstitutional 'trilogue' negotiations. An agreement was eventually reached in March 2017, and the agreed text is due to be voted in the June plenary.

In July 2015, the European Commission proposed a regulation on energy labelling that would replace and repeal the 2010 directive on the subject. The Parliament proposed a series of amendments in July 2016, setting the stage for interinstitutional 'trilogue' negotiations. An agreement was eventually reached in March 2017, and the agreed text is due to be voted in the June plenary.

Energy consumers in the EU

27-04-2017

Consumers are considered a key element of EU energy legislation and the efforts to achieve a transition to a carbon-free society. Back in 2009, the third energy package, which sought to establish a liberalised internal energy market, granted energy consumers a number of rights, such as the right to an electricity connection, to switch energy providers and to receive clear offers, contracts and energy bills. However, some of these rights have not yet been put into practice: consumers often do not ...

Consumers are considered a key element of EU energy legislation and the efforts to achieve a transition to a carbon-free society. Back in 2009, the third energy package, which sought to establish a liberalised internal energy market, granted energy consumers a number of rights, such as the right to an electricity connection, to switch energy providers and to receive clear offers, contracts and energy bills. However, some of these rights have not yet been put into practice: consumers often do not understand their bills, are unable to compare different offers, are charged for switching, or a switch takes too long. Besides, they do not always seem to be aware of their rights. The ongoing revision of EU energy legislation aims to improve some of the rules concerning consumers and to introduce new rights, such as the right to self-generate and self-consume electricity, to ask for a smart meter, or to engage an aggregator. The European Parliament has repeatedly voiced concern that the truly competitive, transparent and consumer-friendly internal energy market envisaged by the third energy package has yet to materialise and that consumers are still having trouble understanding their bills, offers and contracts. It has called, among other things, for providing consumers with increased protection and clearer information, and for requiring suppliers to automatically put customers on the best possible tariff for their individual circumstances.

Buduća događanja

09-01-2020
Europe's challenges in 2020: Ten issues to watch
Drugo događanje -
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