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Research for REGI Committee-Urban Agenda: Assessment from the European Parliament's Perspective

15-11-2019

The 2016 Pact of Amsterdam launched the Urban Agenda for the European Union. Within its framework, partnerships of urban authorities, Member States and other stakeholders have developed action plans to achieve better funding, better knowledge and better regulation for the priority theme of their partnership. This study provides an overview and critical assessment of the current state of play including the position of the European Parliament. Two partnerships, (1) Sustainable Use of Land and Nature-based ...

The 2016 Pact of Amsterdam launched the Urban Agenda for the European Union. Within its framework, partnerships of urban authorities, Member States and other stakeholders have developed action plans to achieve better funding, better knowledge and better regulation for the priority theme of their partnership. This study provides an overview and critical assessment of the current state of play including the position of the European Parliament. Two partnerships, (1) Sustainable Use of Land and Nature-based Solutions and (2) Housing, are studied in more detail.

Externí autor

TU Delft: Willem K KORTHALS ALTES, Marietta EA HAFFNER Assisted by Danielle A GROETELAERS

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the UN High Level Political Forum (HLPF), New York, 16 - 18 July 2018

28-06-2018

The SDGs framework has the potential to provide a useful overarching framework to further the debate on Europe's political priorities, with a view to pursuing social, economic and environmental sustainability both within the Union and globally. However, this requires increasing the political buy-in across sectors. There is a need to translate the SDGs into concrete sectoral political priorities, targets and actions for the EU, and to agree on a legitimate framework for delivering these priorities ...

The SDGs framework has the potential to provide a useful overarching framework to further the debate on Europe's political priorities, with a view to pursuing social, economic and environmental sustainability both within the Union and globally. However, this requires increasing the political buy-in across sectors. There is a need to translate the SDGs into concrete sectoral political priorities, targets and actions for the EU, and to agree on a legitimate framework for delivering these priorities across Member States. The July 2018 HLPF meeting constitutes a window of opportunity to assert influence on the implementation of SDGs in the EU, providing an opportunity to use a range of key current EU initiatives (e.g. the EU circular economy package, post-2020 biodiversity objectives and 2021 – 2027 EU budget) to advance the SDGs debate. In the global context, it will be important to promote linkages between the outcomes of the 2018 HLPF, the forthcoming Global Sustainable Development Report, and other global process of relevance to the environment, including the UNFCCC, the CBD, UNEA, as well as the newly launched negotiations for a global Pact for the Environment. There is a need to set the stage for environment to become more at the heart for the following HLPF, especially in terms of the 4-year stocktake in 2019.

Externí autor

Kettunen M, Charveriat C, Farmer A, Gionfra S, Schweitzer JP & Stainforth T, Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP)

Harnessing the potential of the Urban Agenda for the EU

27-06-2018

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policymaking. To help ...

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policymaking. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched a public consultation following its July 2014 communications on the urban dimension of EU policies. Its findings indicated broad support among city stakeholders for an Urban Agenda for the EU. The European Parliament also prepared an own-initiative report on the issue, as part of a process that would ultimately lead to the signing of the Pact of Amsterdam on 30 May 2016, a clear political commitment to deliver an Urban Agenda. With the pact providing for the creation of 12 urban partnerships focusing on key urban themes, all partnerships are now in operation. Developments such as improved coordination within the Commission on urban issues and new resources including a permanent secretariat have consolidated the Urban Agenda, yet challenges remain. The Commission's proposals for the cohesion framework post-2020, which include the creation of a European urban initiative to support the Urban Agenda, have the potential to further strengthen the Urban Agenda but these plans will be subject to tough negotiations in the months ahead. Ultimately, the success of the Urban Agenda will depend on the partnerships' ability to deliver concrete action plans and on the extent to which they are taken up by the Commission, a process requiring full commitment from all the partners. This Briefing is a further update of an earlier one originally published in June 2016, PE 614.595.

Nature-based solutions: Concept, opportunities and challenges

27-10-2017

Nature-based solutions are actions inspired by, supported by or copied from nature that aim to help societies address a variety of environmental, social and economic challenges in sustainable ways. Most nature-based solutions do not have a single objective, but aim to bring multiple co-benefits. The concept emerged in the 2000s to promote nature as a source of solutions to challenges associated with climate change. It has been supported and broadened by the International Union for the Conservation ...

Nature-based solutions are actions inspired by, supported by or copied from nature that aim to help societies address a variety of environmental, social and economic challenges in sustainable ways. Most nature-based solutions do not have a single objective, but aim to bring multiple co-benefits. The concept emerged in the 2000s to promote nature as a source of solutions to challenges associated with climate change. It has been supported and broadened by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and later by the European Commission. In European Union (EU) policy, nature-based solutions are primarily addressed through the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, which allocated approximately €185 million to the topic between 2014 and 2020. Other EU funds, estimated at €915 million per year, are also allocated to support green infrastructure projects. Other relevant policy initiatives include the 7th environment action programme, the biodiversity strategy, and the communication on green infrastructure. Nature-based solutions can provide a number of opportunities, including: delivering multiple benefits; reducing and/or avoiding costs; contributing to job creation and the green economy; and positioning the EU as a world leader in the area. However, nature-based solutions can also pose a number of challenges, including: tackling knowledge gaps; managing trade-offs; implementing successful actions; dealing with natural elements; and financing projects. The European Parliament has expressed support for nature-based solutions and urged Member States and the European Commission to establish a coherent network of blue-green infrastructure in rural and urban areas across the EU.

Cities: Front line of climate action

05-10-2017

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports ...

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports cities in their efforts by providing guidance, promoting experience-and knowledge-sharing, fostering cooperation, and funding climate action. Climate-relevant initiatives are in place in various policy fields, from transport to the environment, research and innovation, the most high profile being the Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, which currently counts some 7 600 signatories. A supportive framework is essential to ensure city-level initiatives have enough resources and potential to effect meaningful change. Easing access to climate funding and strengthening the role of cities in climate governance are among the main challenges ahead, and the main demands of city associations. The latter issue is being examined by the European Parliament, notably in relation to the proposal for a regulation on energy union governance. Two own-initiative reports exploring the role cities play, first, in the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and, second, in the institutional framework of the Union, are also under preparation.

UN habitat III: Shaping the urban agenda

10-10-2016

The United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (UN Habitat) will hold its third bidecennial meeting from 17 to 20 October 2016 in Quito (Ecuador), gathering nearly 200 national government delegations, as well as different stakeholders. The conference aims to deliver a new global urban agenda and the means to implement it. Rapidly growing urbanisation, especially in developing countries, makes the creation of socially inclusive, resilient, economically prosperous, and energy-efficient ...

The United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (UN Habitat) will hold its third bidecennial meeting from 17 to 20 October 2016 in Quito (Ecuador), gathering nearly 200 national government delegations, as well as different stakeholders. The conference aims to deliver a new global urban agenda and the means to implement it. Rapidly growing urbanisation, especially in developing countries, makes the creation of socially inclusive, resilient, economically prosperous, and energy-efficient cities a major global challenge. Achieving the entire 2030 Agenda will largely rely on the actions undertaken to address the demands of growing cities.

The Role of Cities in Cohesion Policy 2014-2020

15-09-2014

Urban regions are an important factor in regional development. During the 2007-2013 programming period, the main input provided by cities and urban areas was at project level. For the 2014-2020 programming period, Cohesion policy enhances the role of urban areas. Nevertheless, in practice the role of cities still seems similar in scale. As the programming phase is almost completed, there is now limited scope for further influence on the design of the new programmes. The next opportunity to involve ...

Urban regions are an important factor in regional development. During the 2007-2013 programming period, the main input provided by cities and urban areas was at project level. For the 2014-2020 programming period, Cohesion policy enhances the role of urban areas. Nevertheless, in practice the role of cities still seems similar in scale. As the programming phase is almost completed, there is now limited scope for further influence on the design of the new programmes. The next opportunity to involve cities will be as part of partnerships during the programming period.

Úloha měst v politice soudržnosti 2014–2020

14-08-2014

Městské oblasti mají velký význam pro regionální rozvoj. V programovém období 2007–2013 byla města a městské oblasti zapojeny především na úrovni projektů. V programovém období 2014–2020 bude úloha městských oblastí v rámci politiky soudržnosti posílena. Nicméně úloha měst je svým rozsahem prakticky stále srovnatelná. Vzhledem k tomu, že je fáze přípravy programů téměř u konce, lze nyní návrhy nových programů ovlivnit už jen v omezené míře. Další příležitost k zapojení měst bude v rámci partnerství ...

Městské oblasti mají velký význam pro regionální rozvoj. V programovém období 2007–2013 byla města a městské oblasti zapojeny především na úrovni projektů. V programovém období 2014–2020 bude úloha městských oblastí v rámci politiky soudržnosti posílena. Nicméně úloha měst je svým rozsahem prakticky stále srovnatelná. Vzhledem k tomu, že je fáze přípravy programů téměř u konce, lze nyní návrhy nových programů ovlivnit už jen v omezené míře. Další příležitost k zapojení měst bude v rámci partnerství během programového období.

Externí autor

Christine Hamza and Alexandra Frangenheim (Metis GmbH) ; David Charles and Stephen Miller (EPRC)

Growth and sustainable urban development

10-01-2013

Two-thirds of the EU population live in urban areas where environmental, economic, demographic and social challenges are amplified. The EU has made a strong political commitment to sustainable urban development which is reflected through specific instruments and actions financed in the framework of current and future Cohesion policy.

Two-thirds of the EU population live in urban areas where environmental, economic, demographic and social challenges are amplified. The EU has made a strong political commitment to sustainable urban development which is reflected through specific instruments and actions financed in the framework of current and future Cohesion policy.

Urban Transport - Technology Options in Urban Transport: Changing paradigms and promising innovation pathways (Study, Interim Report I - IV and Options Brief)

17-12-2012

Urban transport is related to a wide range of unsolved problems and challenges that need to be tackled in order to guarantee a high quality of life in European cities and to make the transport system an even more efficient pillar of the European economies. This final report highlights relevant aspects and pathways for a transition to a more sustainable urban transport system. For this purpose, relevant technologies and the factors influencing end-user behaviour were analysed, as well as the interrelations ...

Urban transport is related to a wide range of unsolved problems and challenges that need to be tackled in order to guarantee a high quality of life in European cities and to make the transport system an even more efficient pillar of the European economies. This final report highlights relevant aspects and pathways for a transition to a more sustainable urban transport system. For this purpose, relevant technologies and the factors influencing end-user behaviour were analysed, as well as the interrelations between them. The transport system is understood as a socio-technical system of five key elements: paradigms and visions, mobility patterns, technologies and infrastructures, business models, and transport policies. In this report it is illustrated that changes in all elements of the transport system are taking place: - On the one hand, a broad range of innovative technologies and concepts to achieve sustainable urban transport are emerging or are already used. - On the other hand, the paradigm of sustainable transport is about to dominate transport planning in many urban areas and at different governmental levels – which has by far not always been like this. Further there is evidence that travel behaviour is not as static as it seems, but rather changes over time. In several countries, the travel behaviour of some societal groups is evidently changing. All of the five elements offer pathways to sustainable urban transport. Nevertheless, successful pathways do not only require new developments in one of these elements, but in several or in all of them, and at the same time. Against this background it is essential that governance strategies deal with the transport system as a whole. Integrated policies need to consider technical, as well as non-technical factors and developments. The facilitation of learning opportunities is crucial. Innovations need “spaces” to be tested and demonstrated. But, for a successful transition, the transport users need to

Externí autor

This project has been carried out by the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as a member of the European Technology Assessment Group (ETAG). PROJECT LEADER :Jens Schippl, ITAS AUTHORS: Jens Schippl, ITAS, KIT; Maike Puhe, ITAS, KIT

Chystané akce

28-10-2020
Climate Change and Health
Seminář -
ENVI
28-10-2020
Public Hearing "Women and digitalisation"
Slyšení -
FEMM AIDA
28-10-2020
Worskhop on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
Seminář -
PETI

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