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Study in Focus: Labour Mobility and recognition

04-09-2019

An overview of the main findings and recommendations of the study "Labour mobility and recognition in the regulated professions" prepared for the Committee on Employment and Social affairs (EMPL).

An overview of the main findings and recommendations of the study "Labour mobility and recognition in the regulated professions" prepared for the Committee on Employment and Social affairs (EMPL).

European Labour Authority

26-08-2019

The rapid increase in the number of Europeans working in a Member State other than their own, the large number of daily cross-border commuters and the need for information on job opportunities and rights at home and abroad have led the European Commission to propose the creation of a European-level coordinating body. The European Labour Authority (ELA) would replace, reorganise, or cooperate with existing structures dealing with information for individuals and employers, mediate between national ...

The rapid increase in the number of Europeans working in a Member State other than their own, the large number of daily cross-border commuters and the need for information on job opportunities and rights at home and abroad have led the European Commission to propose the creation of a European-level coordinating body. The European Labour Authority (ELA) would replace, reorganise, or cooperate with existing structures dealing with information for individuals and employers, mediate between national labour authorities and social security bodies, and gather viable data on posted workers and commuters. According to the final text of the agreement reached between the Council and the Parliament, the main tasks of the ELA will be to facilitate access to information, enhance cooperation, and coordinate and support concerted and joint inspections. Furthermore, the ELA, in cooperation with Member States and social partner organisations, will assess risks and carry out analyses regarding labour mobility and social security coordination. The ELA may also conclude cooperation agreements with other relevant Union agencies. The European Parliament approved the agreement in plenary on 16 April 2019. The Council adopted the act on 13 June 2019 and the final act was signed on 20 June 2019 and entered into force on 31 July 2019. The Authority will become operational with the capacity to implement its own budget by 1 August 2021. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Health and social security

28-06-2019

While responsibility for health and social security lies primarily with the governments of the individual European Union (EU) Member States, the EU complements national policies, especially those with a cross-border dimension. In a recent poll conducted for the European Parliament, more than two thirds of EU citizens expressed support for increased EU action on health and social security. EU health policy aims to foster good health, protect citizens from health threats and support dynamic health ...

While responsibility for health and social security lies primarily with the governments of the individual European Union (EU) Member States, the EU complements national policies, especially those with a cross-border dimension. In a recent poll conducted for the European Parliament, more than two thirds of EU citizens expressed support for increased EU action on health and social security. EU health policy aims to foster good health, protect citizens from health threats and support dynamic health systems. It is mainly implemented through EU action programmes, currently the third health programme (2014-2020). Challenges include tackling the health needs of an ageing population and reducing the incidence of preventable chronic diseases. Since 2014, steps forward have been made in a number of areas, including antimicrobial resistance, childhood obesity, health systems, medical devices and vaccination. EU action on social security issues in the EU is closely related to the implementation of what is known as the European Pillar of Social Rights as well as labour market developments. The EU helps to promote social cohesion, seeking to foster equality as well as solidarity through adequate, accessible and financially sustainable social protection systems and social inclusion policies. EU spending on social security is tied to labour market measures. Progress can be observed on issues such as work-life balance and equal opportunities, but there is more to do. In the future, social protection schemes will need to be further adapted to the new labour market realities (fewer manufacturing jobs, atypical contracts, 'platform work', etc.). In its proposal for the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, the European Commission plans to boost funding to improve workers' employment opportunities, and strengthen social cohesion through an enlarged 'European Social Fund Plus'. The fund would also incorporate finance for the stand-alone health programme, with the aim of creating synergies with the other building blocks of the European Pillar of Social Rights: equal opportunities and access to the labour market; fair working conditions; and social protection and inclusion. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: The fight against unemployment

28-06-2019

By promoting a high level of employment, the European Union (EU) has been involved in the fight against unemployment since as long ago as the early 1950s. The issue was brought to the top of the European agenda with the onset of the 2008 economic and financial crisis, and the consequent rise in unemployment rates in all European Union (EU) Member States. In its Europe 2020 strategy, the European Commission set a target to get 75 % of 20 to 64 year-olds into employment by 2020. EU labour market conditions ...

By promoting a high level of employment, the European Union (EU) has been involved in the fight against unemployment since as long ago as the early 1950s. The issue was brought to the top of the European agenda with the onset of the 2008 economic and financial crisis, and the consequent rise in unemployment rates in all European Union (EU) Member States. In its Europe 2020 strategy, the European Commission set a target to get 75 % of 20 to 64 year-olds into employment by 2020. EU labour market conditions have significantly improved in recent years, and most labour market indicators have strengthened steadily. Since mid-2013, the unemployment rate has continued to decline, and the EU is back to its pre-crisis level (6.5 % in February 2019). Despite the recovery in economic growth and its positive impact on the labour market, the EU still has to face unemployment challenges, particularly concerning differences between Member States, youth unemployment and long-term unemployment. Since 2014, efforts have been made in a number of areas, including to help young people enter the labour market, to combat long-term unemployment, upgrade skills, and facilitate workers' mobility in the European Union. The improvement in labour market indicators has been reflected in citizens' improved evaluation of the EU's involvement in the fight against unemployment, but there is still a very high demand for even more EU intervention in this policy area (76 % of EU citizens). In the future, new or updated legislation relating to employment could modernise work to help in adjustment to a digital world, support sustainable transitions from unemployment into employment and between jobs, increase labour mobility and create closer coordination between economic and social policies. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Labour mobility and recognition in the regulated professions (Study + Annex I - IV)

15-03-2019

This study analyses the impact on labour mobility and employment of the 2013 revision of the Professional Qualifications Directive (DIR 2005/36) and related EU initiatives. It analyses trends in mobility and recognition, focussing on the health sector and four country case studies- Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Romania. It reports findings from consultations with stakeholders at EU and national level and highlights best practice. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request ...

This study analyses the impact on labour mobility and employment of the 2013 revision of the Professional Qualifications Directive (DIR 2005/36) and related EU initiatives. It analyses trends in mobility and recognition, focussing on the health sector and four country case studies- Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Romania. It reports findings from consultations with stakeholders at EU and national level and highlights best practice. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament’s Employment and Social Affairs Committee.

Externí autor

Milieu consulting, SPRL

The cost of non-Europe in the area of legal migration

14-03-2019

Further EU action in the area of legal migration could address obstacles experienced by Third Country Nationals within the European Union. Depending on the policy option pursued these options could result in up to €21,75 billion in benefits. Further gains could be made by addressing the fragmented national policies in this area, which are currently undermining ability of the EU as a whole to attract the workers and researchers it needs.

Further EU action in the area of legal migration could address obstacles experienced by Third Country Nationals within the European Union. Depending on the policy option pursued these options could result in up to €21,75 billion in benefits. Further gains could be made by addressing the fragmented national policies in this area, which are currently undermining ability of the EU as a whole to attract the workers and researchers it needs.

EU-Ukraine people-to-people contacts

15-02-2019

The 2014 Revolution of Dignity in Ukraine began as a grassroots movement, channelling public calls for a functioning democracy, a European outlook and an end to corruption. Since then, the European Union (EU) has been unrelenting in its support for Kyiv's ambitious reform process as well as for Ukraine's vibrant civil society.

The 2014 Revolution of Dignity in Ukraine began as a grassroots movement, channelling public calls for a functioning democracy, a European outlook and an end to corruption. Since then, the European Union (EU) has been unrelenting in its support for Kyiv's ambitious reform process as well as for Ukraine's vibrant civil society.

Employment barriers in border regions: Strategies and EU funding

15-01-2019

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways ...

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways to facilitate cross-border labour mobility going forward. This analysis has been produced by Policy Department A at request of the EMPL Committee to feed into its work on the European Social Fund Plus.

Research for CULT Committee - Mobility of artists and culture professionals: towards a European policy framework

14-09-2018

Mobility is a social and economic condition of artists and culture professionals and, at the same time, a vector of social and economic development. However, mobility in the cultural and creative sectors is faced with a number of issues that need to be addressed at EU and national levels. The paper provides recommendations for a EU-wide mobility framework which entails both a dedicated mobility scheme and an improved regulatory environment that would facilitate mobility in Europe.

Mobility is a social and economic condition of artists and culture professionals and, at the same time, a vector of social and economic development. However, mobility in the cultural and creative sectors is faced with a number of issues that need to be addressed at EU and national levels. The paper provides recommendations for a EU-wide mobility framework which entails both a dedicated mobility scheme and an improved regulatory environment that would facilitate mobility in Europe.

Externí autor

KEA European Affairs: Clémentine Daubeuf, Teodora Pletosu, Philippe Kern, Arthur Le Gall

Posting of Workers Directive

25-07-2018

Posting of workers plays an important role in the internal market, particularly in the cross-border provision of services. While the number of posted workers continues to increase significantly, problems such as unfair practices and unequal remuneration persist. In addition, the correct balance between the freedom to provide cross-border services and the social rights of workers is needed, and moreover, needs to be adapted to today's labour market situation. The targeted revision of the Posting of ...

Posting of workers plays an important role in the internal market, particularly in the cross-border provision of services. While the number of posted workers continues to increase significantly, problems such as unfair practices and unequal remuneration persist. In addition, the correct balance between the freedom to provide cross-border services and the social rights of workers is needed, and moreover, needs to be adapted to today's labour market situation. The targeted revision of the Posting of Workers Directive (96/71/EC) proposed by the Commission intended to bring changes in three main areas: the remuneration of posted workers (making it equal to that of local workers, even when subcontracting), more coherent rules on temporary agency workers, as well as long-term posting. The agreement reached in trilogue negotiations states that long-term posting (with labour law provisions of the host country to be applied) starts after 12 months (with a possible extension of six months). The overall amount of remuneration received by a posted worker must meet the level of remuneration in the host Member State (without the reimbursement of the worker's expenses) which must be published on a single national website. Host Member States can accord to posted workers the coverage of representative collective agreements in all sectors, and they must protect them against fraudulent posting. The Parliament approved the text on 29 May 2018, the act was adopted by the Council on 21 June 2018 and the final act was signed on 28 June 2018. Member States have until 30 July 2020 to transpose the measures of the directive and apply them in their national law. Sixth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

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