6

výsledky

Slovo (slova)
Druh publikace
Oblast
Autor
Klíčové slovo
Datum

Stakeholder, Parliamentary and Third Country Concerns about the EU-Canada Comprehensive Trade and Economic Agreement (CETA)

16-12-2014

The EU-Canada Comprehensive Trade and Economic Agreement (CETA) – covering a plethora of issues, including market access, tariffs and non-tariff barriers – has elicited varied reactions from stakeholders. Business associations on both sides of the Atlantic have strongly supported the deal and its aim to boost economic relations between the partners. On the other hand, some civil society groups, trade unions and agricultural associations have voiced hesitations about some of the deal’s provisions ...

The EU-Canada Comprehensive Trade and Economic Agreement (CETA) – covering a plethora of issues, including market access, tariffs and non-tariff barriers – has elicited varied reactions from stakeholders. Business associations on both sides of the Atlantic have strongly supported the deal and its aim to boost economic relations between the partners. On the other hand, some civil society groups, trade unions and agricultural associations have voiced hesitations about some of the deal’s provisions and its impact on the agricultural sector, the job market and quality of public services. CETA negotiations have also provided civil society an opportunity to discuss indirectly related issues, including visa policies, data privacy and the EU ban on the trade in seal products. Both the European and Canadian Parliaments have actively monitored the negotiations and provided opportunities for stakeholders to express their opinions. While consultation and public outreach now appears to have resolved most hurdles, criticism about the negotiations’ transparency and inclusiveness – as well as concerns about the inclusion of investment protection clauses – have not entirely abated. Turkey and Canada’s partners in the North American Free Trade Agreement (the US and Mexico) also have distinct reasons to fear the impact of CETA on their own economies.

Seals and fish stocks in Irish waters

01-10-2010

Conflict exists between seals and fisheries, with seals affecting fisheries through damage to catches and gear and competition for resources. Fisheries can affect seals through accidental by-catch, and overfishing can reduce prey availability. This briefing note provides a comprehensive review of the situation in Irish waters, using existing data augmented with information from key industry stakeholders to provide a realistic and representative account of the current situation. Recommendations are ...

Conflict exists between seals and fisheries, with seals affecting fisheries through damage to catches and gear and competition for resources. Fisheries can affect seals through accidental by-catch, and overfishing can reduce prey availability. This briefing note provides a comprehensive review of the situation in Irish waters, using existing data augmented with information from key industry stakeholders to provide a realistic and representative account of the current situation. Recommendations are outlined to aid management decisions for reducing the interactions between seals and fisheries in Ireland.

Externí autor

Michelle CRONIN, Coastal & Marine Resources Centre, University College Cork Mark JESSOPP, Coastal & Marine Resources Centre, University College Cork David REID, Marine Institute, Galway

Seals and fish stocks in Scottish waters

01-10-2010

Fish stocks in Scottish waters show strong signs of depletion and overexploitation. Grey seals have increased over four decades but have been gradually stabilising in the last 10 years. Many harbour seal populations have declined sharply in the past 10 years. The diets of both species of seals overlap with commercial fisheries but exploitation rates of fish species by seals are much lower than they are for fisheries. Even a large reduction in the number of seals in Scottish waters would be unlikely ...

Fish stocks in Scottish waters show strong signs of depletion and overexploitation. Grey seals have increased over four decades but have been gradually stabilising in the last 10 years. Many harbour seal populations have declined sharply in the past 10 years. The diets of both species of seals overlap with commercial fisheries but exploitation rates of fish species by seals are much lower than they are for fisheries. Even a large reduction in the number of seals in Scottish waters would be unlikely to make any noticeable impact to the success of demersal or pelagic fisheries

Externí autor

Ian L. BOYD, Philip S. HAMMOND University of St Andrews, Sea Mammal Research Unit

Potential solutions to the sealsfisheries conflicts

01-10-2010

Coexistence between seals and fisheries is desirable and possible. Some seal-safe gear and scaring methods work, but much remains to be done. Gear development requires strong and persistent public support. Awaiting technical mitigation methods economic compensation is possible. The efficiency of protective hunting is doubtful. Opinion differs on whether a reduction of the number of seals will benefit the fishery. A thorough case by case analysis is needed to reach a conclusion about the result of ...

Coexistence between seals and fisheries is desirable and possible. Some seal-safe gear and scaring methods work, but much remains to be done. Gear development requires strong and persistent public support. Awaiting technical mitigation methods economic compensation is possible. The efficiency of protective hunting is doubtful. Opinion differs on whether a reduction of the number of seals will benefit the fishery. A thorough case by case analysis is needed to reach a conclusion about the result of decimating a seal population.

Externí autor

Håkan WESTERBERG Swedish Board of Fisheries

Seals and fish stocks in the North-East Atlantic

01-10-2010

Industrial and offshore fisheries using active gear have minor or insignificant interactions with seals, whereas some coastal fisheries based on passive gear can experience severe losses in catches and damages to gear. Seals also have impacts on fish farms, which can be protected by a combination of mitigation measures such as hunting, predator nets and acoustic deterrents. Seals spread a parasitic worm, which is seldom a problem in oceanic systems, but may be locally abundant close to main seal ...

Industrial and offshore fisheries using active gear have minor or insignificant interactions with seals, whereas some coastal fisheries based on passive gear can experience severe losses in catches and damages to gear. Seals also have impacts on fish farms, which can be protected by a combination of mitigation measures such as hunting, predator nets and acoustic deterrents. Seals spread a parasitic worm, which is seldom a problem in oceanic systems, but may be locally abundant close to main seal colonies.

Externí autor

Tero HÄRKÖNEN Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Contaminant Research, Stockholm

Interactions between Seals and Commercial Fisheries in the North-East Atlantic

15-02-2002

Executive summary The full report identifies the most important interactions between seals and commercial fisheries in the North-East Atlantic Ocean (including the North and Baltic Seas), summarises information on the abundance and diet of the three most numerous seal species, describes the status of fish stocks that are believed to interact with these population either directly or indirectly, and reviews the methods that have been used to analyse the interactions between seals and fisheries. Interactions ...

Executive summary The full report identifies the most important interactions between seals and commercial fisheries in the North-East Atlantic Ocean (including the North and Baltic Seas), summarises information on the abundance and diet of the three most numerous seal species, describes the status of fish stocks that are believed to interact with these population either directly or indirectly, and reviews the methods that have been used to analyse the interactions between seals and fisheries. Interactions between seals and fisheries can be divided into two categories: direct interactions, in which seals remove or damage fish from fishing gear, or seals die after because they have become caught in fishing gear; and indirect interactions, in which seals and fishers appear to be competitors for the same resource. The most important interactions in the area covered by this report are: • Grey seals and cod in the North Sea; • Grey seals, harbour seals and Atlantic salmon in the North-East Atlantic; • Grey seals and salmon and whitefish fisheries in the Baltic Sea; • Grey seals and monkfish in the Celtic and Irish Seas and off South-West England. The first of these is an indirect interaction. All of the others are, primarily, direct interactions.

Externí autor

J. HARWOOD and M. WALTON (NERC, Sea Mammal Research Unit, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom)

Chystané akce

27-10-2020
Hearing on Rebuilding fish stocks in the Mediterranean: next steps
Slyšení -
PECH
27-10-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | Beyond Christendom - The politics of religion in Europe today
Další akce -
EPRS
27-10-2020
JURI: ICM Meeting on "Better Law Making from a digital perspective"
Další akce -
JURI

Partneři