Complementary Impact Assessment on interactions between EU air quality policy and climate and energy policy

04-11-2014

This study was undertaken at the request of the European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety. It provides a complementary impact assessment, exploring the interactions between the European Union’s air quality policy and the proposed EU climate and energy policy. It shows that reduced consumption of polluting fuels resulting from the climate and energy targets that have been put forward by the European Commission in early 2014 (i.e., a 40% reduction in GHGs, a share of 27% renewables, and a 30% improvement of energy efficiency compared to the 2007 baseline), would reduce premature mortality from fine particulate matter in the EU and make further air quality improvements less costly.

This study was undertaken at the request of the European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety. It provides a complementary impact assessment, exploring the interactions between the European Union’s air quality policy and the proposed EU climate and energy policy. It shows that reduced consumption of polluting fuels resulting from the climate and energy targets that have been put forward by the European Commission in early 2014 (i.e., a 40% reduction in GHGs, a share of 27% renewables, and a 30% improvement of energy efficiency compared to the 2007 baseline), would reduce premature mortality from fine particulate matter in the EU and make further air quality improvements less costly.

Ekstern forfatter

This study has been performed by Markus Amann, Chris Heyes, Gregor Kiesewetter, Wolfgang Schöpp and Fabian Wagner of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg, Austria, at the request of the Impact Assessment Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the General Secretariat of the European Parliament.