7

resultat(er)

Ord
Type af publikation
Politikområde
Forfatter
Dato

International procurement instrument

30-11-2017

Over the years, the EU has opened up its public procurement markets to third countries to a large degree, yet many of these countries have not granted the EU a similar privilege. This situation has been difficult to address through multilateral or bilateral trade negotiations alone. With this in mind, the European Commission proposed the creation of an international procurement instrument in 2012. The aim of this instrument is twofold: to improve the conditions under which EU businesses can compete ...

Over the years, the EU has opened up its public procurement markets to third countries to a large degree, yet many of these countries have not granted the EU a similar privilege. This situation has been difficult to address through multilateral or bilateral trade negotiations alone. With this in mind, the European Commission proposed the creation of an international procurement instrument in 2012. The aim of this instrument is twofold: to improve the conditions under which EU businesses can compete for public contracts in third countries and to give the EU more leverage when negotiating its access to foreign public procurement markets. To overcome a legislative deadlock on the 2012 proposal, in 2016 the Commission submitted an amended version that would enable it to open investigations into alleged discrimination against EU parties in foreign public procurement markets. If such practices were to be confirmed, the Commission would enter into consultations with the third country concerned to obtain reciprocal concessions on its procurement market. As a last resort, the Commission would be able to impose a price penalty on tenders originating in the third country concerned, giving EU and non-targeted countries' tenders a competitive advantage on EU procurement markets.

Understanding non-tariff barriers in the single market

09-10-2017

Despite the achievements of single market integration, many non-tariff barriers (NTBs) persist, preventing realisation of its full economic potential. These arise from laws, technical regulations and practices, and create obstacles for trade. NTBs can be of a general character, such as problems with the implementation and enforcement of EU law at the national level, missing or differing e-government solutions, or complex VAT requirements in intra-EU trade. NTBs can also be sector-specific and concern ...

Despite the achievements of single market integration, many non-tariff barriers (NTBs) persist, preventing realisation of its full economic potential. These arise from laws, technical regulations and practices, and create obstacles for trade. NTBs can be of a general character, such as problems with the implementation and enforcement of EU law at the national level, missing or differing e-government solutions, or complex VAT requirements in intra-EU trade. NTBs can also be sector-specific and concern only specific markets for goods, services or retail. Accordingly, the EU is tackling NTBs with a mix of general and sectoral initiatives, often cutting across various policy areas. The Juncker Commission, now at the mid-term of its mandate, made deepening the single market one of its main priorities. The Commission's single market and digital single market strategies address many NTBs. However, greater Member State involvement, stronger monitoring, and increased political emphasis on the single market are likely to be needed to remove the barriers and deepen single market integration. NTBs are also increasingly mentioned in the context of debates on the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union. The impacts of Brexit on the single market and NTBs are as yet unclear, but early analysis points to the likelihood of legal uncertainty and the need to address a multitude of often challenging issues.

The role of eGovernment in deepening the single market

22-09-2017

eGovernment, which involves deploying technology to deliver public services, increases administrative efficiency and reduces the administrative burden on the public and businesses. The EU has been actively promoting implementation of eGovernment practices, in particular in cross-border situations. Many studies point to significant savings for national authorities and reduced costs for businesses through further advancement of eGovernment in Europe. However, a low level of digitisation of public services ...

eGovernment, which involves deploying technology to deliver public services, increases administrative efficiency and reduces the administrative burden on the public and businesses. The EU has been actively promoting implementation of eGovernment practices, in particular in cross-border situations. Many studies point to significant savings for national authorities and reduced costs for businesses through further advancement of eGovernment in Europe. However, a low level of digitisation of public services and the lack of interoperability between eGovernment systems still present major electronic and procedural barriers to the free movement of goods, services and people in the single market. Other problems include insufficient access to information and low usability of the services offered. Many Member States are well advanced at national level, but the cross-border provision of e-services is still lagging behind. In order to address these issues, various policy initiatives have already been launched or are planned under the digital single market strategy and the eGovernment 2016-2020 action plan. A further boost should come from the current Estonian EU Council Presidency, which has made promotion of eGovernment one of its main priorities.

Green Public Procurement and the EU Action Plan for the Circular Economy

15-06-2017

Public procurement and the purchasing of services, works and supplies cover about 14 % of European gross domestic product (GDP). Procurement initiatives, tools and guidance therefore have tremendous power and make products and services greener and more sustainable. The assessment carried out in this study provides results on the applicability of ongoing initiatives and shows how they contribute to the European Commission´s Action Plan on the Circular Economy. With the proposed recommendations the ...

Public procurement and the purchasing of services, works and supplies cover about 14 % of European gross domestic product (GDP). Procurement initiatives, tools and guidance therefore have tremendous power and make products and services greener and more sustainable. The assessment carried out in this study provides results on the applicability of ongoing initiatives and shows how they contribute to the European Commission´s Action Plan on the Circular Economy. With the proposed recommendations the involved parties are offered possibilities and options for a better approach in the future.

Ekstern forfatter

Christian NEUBAUER, Mervyn JONES, Francesca MONTEVECCHI, Christian NEUBAUER, Hanna SCHREIBER, Angelika TISCH, Birgit WALTER

The Fourth Railway Package: an overview

20-02-2014

Over the past decade, the European Commission has pursued a strategy for the revival of rail transport in the European Union (EU), to achieve a more competitive and resource-efficient transport system. In 2013 this process has moved to a new phase with the publication of a draft legislative package aimed at liberalising domestic passenger rail services within EU Member States.

Over the past decade, the European Commission has pursued a strategy for the revival of rail transport in the European Union (EU), to achieve a more competitive and resource-efficient transport system. In 2013 this process has moved to a new phase with the publication of a draft legislative package aimed at liberalising domestic passenger rail services within EU Member States.

An Economic Analysis of the Closure of Markets and other Dysfunctions in the Awarding of Concession Contracts

15-06-2012

As concession contracts are long-term agreements that are inherently incomplete, the economic literature suggests that rigid award rules are inadequate. We suggest that the Directive for the awarding of concession contracts should contain a balanced mix of flexible and rigid rules, as well as procedures to increase the transparency and accountability of contracting parties. This briefing note provides suggestions in order to avoid the closure of markets and other dysfunctions in the awarding of concession ...

As concession contracts are long-term agreements that are inherently incomplete, the economic literature suggests that rigid award rules are inadequate. We suggest that the Directive for the awarding of concession contracts should contain a balanced mix of flexible and rigid rules, as well as procedures to increase the transparency and accountability of contracting parties. This briefing note provides suggestions in order to avoid the closure of markets and other dysfunctions in the awarding of concession contracts.

Ekstern forfatter

Stéphane SAUSSIER (Sorbonne Business School)

Risks of Corruption and Collusion in the Awarding of Concession Contracts

15-06-2012

This briefing note describes the risk of undue influence, corruption and collusion on sector-governance decisions and the award of concession contracts. State intervention to reduce market failure easily creates a risk of governance failure, and this concern must be addressed to secure the intended combination of market forces and sector regulation – as is so well offered by concession contracts. Harmonised EU legislation specifically on the award of concession contracts is an important step to reduce ...

This briefing note describes the risk of undue influence, corruption and collusion on sector-governance decisions and the award of concession contracts. State intervention to reduce market failure easily creates a risk of governance failure, and this concern must be addressed to secure the intended combination of market forces and sector regulation – as is so well offered by concession contracts. Harmonised EU legislation specifically on the award of concession contracts is an important step to reduce the mentioned risks, particularly because it will make undue influence on these markets more visible across Member States and develop a common understanding of how to best secure ‘value for money’ for consumers. However, the impact of the new rules on the award of concession contracts will depend not only on how carefully they are implemented, but also the quality of a broader set of integrity mechanisms within the respective Member States. Hence, while the law is an important step towards securing efficient regulation, we need checks and balances on the many decisions that are still up for discretionary judgment by politicians and civil servants with sector oversight responsibility.

Ekstern forfatter

Tina Søreide (University of Bergen, Faculty of Law, Norway)

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