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The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

17-05-2016

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in May 2015.

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

19-05-2015

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in November 2013.

EU Readmission Agreements: Facilitating the return of irregular migrants

24-04-2015

EU Readmission Agreements (EURAs) are based on reciprocal obligations and are concluded between the European Union and non-EU countries to facilitate the return of people residing irregularly in a country to their country of origin or to a country of transit. They operate alongside but take precedence over bilateral readmission agreements between individual EU Member States and non-EU countries. They are negotiated in a broader context where partner countries are usually granted visa facilitation ...

EU Readmission Agreements (EURAs) are based on reciprocal obligations and are concluded between the European Union and non-EU countries to facilitate the return of people residing irregularly in a country to their country of origin or to a country of transit. They operate alongside but take precedence over bilateral readmission agreements between individual EU Member States and non-EU countries. They are negotiated in a broader context where partner countries are usually granted visa facilitation and other incentives such as financial support for implementing the agreement or special trade conditions in exchange for readmitting people residing without authorisation in the EU. As such, they are crucial to the EU’s return policy, as defined in the Return Directive (Directive 2008/115/EC). The legal basis for concluding EURAs is Article 79(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). They are negotiated with the partner country on the basis of a negotiating mandate granted by the Council to the Commission. They are then concluded after the European Parliament has given its consent. Once they come into force, their effectiveness can vary significantly from country to country. In the past, the European Parliament (EP) has raised concerns that EURAs do not provide sufficient human-rights safeguards to ensure the protection of returnees at all times. The EURA with Albania (signed in 2005) was the first to reflect the EP's concerns about this insufficient reference to human rights.

Europäisches Unterstützungsbüro für Asylfragen (EASO)

30-01-2015

Das Europäische Unterstützungsbüro für Asylfragen (EASO) ist eine Agentur der EU, die die Mittel bereitstellt, um die Mitgliedstaaten bei der Vorbereitung auf einen Zustrom von Asylbewerbern zu unterstützen und die Rechtsvorschriften der EU in diesem Bereich umzusetzen. Es unterstützt auch diejenigen Mitgliedstaaten, die in Asylangelegenheiten besonderem Druck ausgesetzt sind.

Das Europäische Unterstützungsbüro für Asylfragen (EASO) ist eine Agentur der EU, die die Mittel bereitstellt, um die Mitgliedstaaten bei der Vorbereitung auf einen Zustrom von Asylbewerbern zu unterstützen und die Rechtsvorschriften der EU in diesem Bereich umzusetzen. Es unterstützt auch diejenigen Mitgliedstaaten, die in Asylangelegenheiten besonderem Druck ausgesetzt sind.

Frontex – Schutz der EU-Außengrenzen

30-01-2015

Die Agentur Frontex unterstützt die EU-Mitgliedstaaten, die einem starken Migrationsdruck ausgesetzt sind, bei der Sicherung der Außengrenzen der EU, indem sie den Einsatz von Ausrüstungsgegenständen und Grenzschutzbeamten koordiniert, die von den Mitgliedstaaten zur Verfügung gestellt werden. In den vergangenen Jahren hat Frontex eine Reihe von Operationen vor den Küsten Griechenlands, Italiens und Spaniens sowie an den östlichen Landgrenzen der Union geleitet. Angesichts des anhaltenden Zustroms ...

Die Agentur Frontex unterstützt die EU-Mitgliedstaaten, die einem starken Migrationsdruck ausgesetzt sind, bei der Sicherung der Außengrenzen der EU, indem sie den Einsatz von Ausrüstungsgegenständen und Grenzschutzbeamten koordiniert, die von den Mitgliedstaaten zur Verfügung gestellt werden. In den vergangenen Jahren hat Frontex eine Reihe von Operationen vor den Küsten Griechenlands, Italiens und Spaniens sowie an den östlichen Landgrenzen der Union geleitet. Angesichts des anhaltenden Zustroms von Migranten, die auf immer mehr Routen und mit immer neuen Methoden versuchen, in die Union zu gelangen, unterstreichen zahlreiche Sachverständige die begrenzten Ressourcen, über die Frontex verfügt, und fordern die EU und ihre Mitgliedstaaten auf, ihre Beiträge zu der Agentur zu erhöhen.

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