14

Ergebnis(se)

Wort/Wörter
Art der Veröffentlichung
Politikbereich
Verfasser
Schlagwortliste
Datum

Research for PECH Committee - Landing Obligation and Choke Species in Multispecies and Mixed Fisheries - The North Western Waters

16-04-2018

The issue of choke species has been highlighted as the biggest single problem in implementing the landing obligation. This study looks at the choke issues within North Western Waters. It reports on the findings of choke analysis carried out and evalutes the effectiveness of available tools and measures within the CFP to reduce the risk of choke species. Finally three future scenarios – Fmsy 2020, Brexit and climate change – are considered and how these will impact on the implementation of the landing ...

The issue of choke species has been highlighted as the biggest single problem in implementing the landing obligation. This study looks at the choke issues within North Western Waters. It reports on the findings of choke analysis carried out and evalutes the effectiveness of available tools and measures within the CFP to reduce the risk of choke species. Finally three future scenarios – Fmsy 2020, Brexit and climate change – are considered and how these will impact on the implementation of the landing obligation.

Externe Autor

BIM, Ireland: Dominic RIHAN

Judicial remedies for individuals before the highest jurisdictions, a comparative law perspective - The United Kingdom

09-10-2017

The study presented below forms part of a larger project whose aim is to provide a comparative analysis of the rights of individuals in law proceedings before the highest courts of different States and before certain international courts. The objective is to describe the various remedies developed under domestic law that are available through the UK courts including the Supreme Court which, though not a constitutional court in the classic Kelsenian model, does sits at the apex of the appellate court ...

The study presented below forms part of a larger project whose aim is to provide a comparative analysis of the rights of individuals in law proceedings before the highest courts of different States and before certain international courts. The objective is to describe the various remedies developed under domestic law that are available through the UK courts including the Supreme Court which, though not a constitutional court in the classic Kelsenian model, does sits at the apex of the appellate court structure in the UK. The study commences with an historical introduction which stresses the absence in domestic law of a clearly delineated sense of what counts as ‘constitutional’ .In traditional accounts of the UK Constitution there is no hierarchy of higher order ‘constitutional’ and ‘ordinary’ Acts of Parliament. Neither has a separate court structure developed to handle exclusively constitutional claims, although specialised ad hoc tribunals do exist in public law contexts. The underpinning principles remain (i) the doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty and (ii) the rule of law. After this introduction, a review is provided of the main remedies and procedures used for the redress of grievances against public bodies. In a subsequent section of materials, a table of the main sources of individual rights against the state is provided. The domestic status of constitutional conventions and international law are dealt with in this part. Then, an account of the substantive norms informing the standards of effective protection for the individual is given, including some critical commentary on the operation of key provisions. The concluding section compares the benefits and drawbacks of specialised tribunal adjudication, the ‘politicised’ nature of certain judicial review proceedings against a background of increasing privately-owned provision of services to the public and the continuing relevance of private law tort claims where compensation for mistreatment at the hands of the state is sought.

Externe Autor

EPRS, Comparative Law

Start of Brexit negotiations [What Think Tanks are thinking]

23-06-2017

Formal negotiations on the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union under Article 50 TEU got under way on 19 June, as both sides agreed in principle how to organise the talks and underlined their mutual goodwill. The talks began nearly a year after the UK referendum (on 23 June 2016) resulted in the vote to leave the EU, and less than two weeks after a general election that left the ruling Conservative Party without a majority in the House of Commons. This note offers links to recent commentaries ...

Formal negotiations on the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union under Article 50 TEU got under way on 19 June, as both sides agreed in principle how to organise the talks and underlined their mutual goodwill. The talks began nearly a year after the UK referendum (on 23 June 2016) resulted in the vote to leave the EU, and less than two weeks after a general election that left the ruling Conservative Party without a majority in the House of Commons. This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports published by major international think tanks on the UK’s plans to leave the EU and the wider implications of Brexit.

The Impact of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union on Scotland, Wales and Gibraltar

26-04-2017

Upon request by the AFCO Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs has commissioned this in-depth analysis on the impact of Brexit on the devolved territories of Scotland and Wales as well as the Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. It examines the economic and political implications of Brexit on these territories, the consequences of the possible return to devolved administrations of formerly ‘Europeanised’ competencies and looks at how Brexit might affect their ...

Upon request by the AFCO Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs has commissioned this in-depth analysis on the impact of Brexit on the devolved territories of Scotland and Wales as well as the Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. It examines the economic and political implications of Brexit on these territories, the consequences of the possible return to devolved administrations of formerly ‘Europeanised’ competencies and looks at how Brexit might affect their future status within the UK as well as their relations with the EU.

The Brexit Negotiations: An Assessment of the Legal, Political and Institutional Situation in the UK

16-03-2017

Upon request by the AFCO Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned an in-depth analysis on the political and institutional situation in the United Kingdom following the referendum on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. The research analyses the post-Brexit political developments in the UK, the various parameters that should be taken into account, by both the UK government and the 27, in view of the Article 50 negotiations and the possible shape of ...

Upon request by the AFCO Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned an in-depth analysis on the political and institutional situation in the United Kingdom following the referendum on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. The research analyses the post-Brexit political developments in the UK, the various parameters that should be taken into account, by both the UK government and the 27, in view of the Article 50 negotiations and the possible shape of the final deal and the future economic relationship, taking into account the EU obligations and the constraints of Theresa May’s government.

Brexit Literature Update 3/2017

03-03-2017

Following a relevant request by the Committee for Constitutional Affairs, the Policy Department on Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs has been compiling, on a regular basis, a number of academic and scholarly materials related to the process of, and the negotiations on, the withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Since the June 2016 referendum in the UK, Brexit-related literature has grown significantly and it is probably going to expand further in the future. Thus, this compilation is far from ...

Following a relevant request by the Committee for Constitutional Affairs, the Policy Department on Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs has been compiling, on a regular basis, a number of academic and scholarly materials related to the process of, and the negotiations on, the withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Since the June 2016 referendum in the UK, Brexit-related literature has grown significantly and it is probably going to expand further in the future. Thus, this compilation is far from exhaustive; rather, it identifies some of the more useful articles, taking into account, in particular, the following elements: • Scholarly rather than a journalistic publication • Originality and interest • Recent publication • Be of interest for the EU • Constitutional or institutional relevance.

Brexit and the future of the European Union [What Think Tanks are thinking]

22-07-2016

The United Kingdom's vote on 23 June to leave the European Union has stirred lively debate on the implications of Brexit for the institutions, policies and global role of the European Union. This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports by major international think tanks on the future of the EU without Britain. More studies on issues raised by the vote can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are thinking' from July 7, 2016.

The United Kingdom's vote on 23 June to leave the European Union has stirred lively debate on the implications of Brexit for the institutions, policies and global role of the European Union. This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports by major international think tanks on the future of the EU without Britain. More studies on issues raised by the vote can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are thinking' from July 7, 2016.

Potential and Challenges of e-Participation in the European Union

06-06-2016

This study was commissioned and supervised by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee. European countries have started exploring e-participation as a way to regain citizens' trust and revitalise European democracy by developing a more responsive, transparent and participatory decision-making process. The main objectives of the study are to identify best practices in EU Member States, describe e-participation ...

This study was commissioned and supervised by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee. European countries have started exploring e-participation as a way to regain citizens' trust and revitalise European democracy by developing a more responsive, transparent and participatory decision-making process. The main objectives of the study are to identify best practices in EU Member States, describe e-participation tools and initiatives at the EU level, and explain the benefits and challenges of e-participation.

Externe Autor

Elisa LIRONI (European Citizen Action Service - ECAS)

The Balance of Competences Review in the United Kingdom, 2012-2014

12-01-2016

Against a backdrop of continuing and often intense political debate in the United Kingdom about its relationship with the rest of the European Union (EU), the Coalition Agreement of May 2010, underpinning the 2010-2015 Conservative–Liberal Democrat government, stated that the new administration would ‘examine the balance of the EU’s existing competences’, in the context of an overall government commitment to ‘ensure that there is no further transfer of sovereignty or powers’ to the EU during that ...

Against a backdrop of continuing and often intense political debate in the United Kingdom about its relationship with the rest of the European Union (EU), the Coalition Agreement of May 2010, underpinning the 2010-2015 Conservative–Liberal Democrat government, stated that the new administration would ‘examine the balance of the EU’s existing competences’, in the context of an overall government commitment to ‘ensure that there is no further transfer of sovereignty or powers’ to the EU during that five-year parliamentary term. This process was taken forward in a formal ‘Review of the Balance of Competences between the UK and the EU’, which was launched in July 2012 and concluded in December 2014. The UK government’s official communication to the House of Commons and House of Lords to launch the Balance of Competences Review (Command Paper 8415) used a broad definition of EU competence, covering ‘everything deriving from EU law that affects what happens in the UK’. The review was to seek to examine all the areas where the Treaties gave the EU competence to act (see box below), and to audit what the EU did and how this affected the UK. The whole process would be ‘comprehensive, well-informed and analytical’, gathering evidence to help inform public debate. Whilst the review would be government-led, it would also involve outside experts, organisations and individuals who wished to feed in their views on the issues covered.

EU rural development policy

24-09-2015

The rural development concept has evolved significantly over recent decades to become a fully-fledged policy at European Union level. It has adapted to an enlarged Europe which, from 2004, welcomed 13 new countries, adding much diversity to an already strongly contrasted rural Europe. Adaptation was also needed to cope with important socio-economic and demographic changes affecting rural areas, and to face new challenges such as climate change, the production of energy from renewable sources, and ...

The rural development concept has evolved significantly over recent decades to become a fully-fledged policy at European Union level. It has adapted to an enlarged Europe which, from 2004, welcomed 13 new countries, adding much diversity to an already strongly contrasted rural Europe. Adaptation was also needed to cope with important socio-economic and demographic changes affecting rural areas, and to face new challenges such as climate change, the production of energy from renewable sources, and the need for more competitive and sustainable agriculture. The new rural development policy for 2014-20, designed to improve quality of life in rural communities, seeks to address these issues and to harness the full potential of rural areas. It forms an integral part of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), reformed in 2013, and relies on an EU budget of more than €99.3 billion. The policy is fully aligned with the Europe 2020 strategy objectives for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. A particular feature of the policy is that national, regional and local authorities are responsible for designing and implementing their seven-year rural development programmes, based on EU priorities and a 'menu' of measures proposed in the European agricultural fund for rural development, which provides EU co financing. The increased flexibility of the new policy means that it offers support more closely tailored to the particular needs of each region or country. The European Parliament, as co-legislator for the reformed CAP, plays an active role in shaping rural development policy and pushed for measures for farmers and rural stakeholders more favourable than those originally tabled by the European Commission.

Partner