EU scientific cooperation with third countries

02-07-2015

Scientific cooperation with third countries aims to strengthen the European Union's attractiveness and competitiveness, tackle global societal challenges and support EU external policies. Science diplomacy is also an increasingly important tool to ease cooperation with third countries. The EU strategy for international scientific cooperation focuses on two dimensions. First, the research programmes carried out by the EU are open to participation by research institutions and researchers worldwide. Second, the EU is developing targeted strategies – multiannual roadmaps – with selected countries in order to achieve specific objectives. To support scientific cooperation, the EU has signed international agreements with 20 countries to provide a framework for bilateral cooperation. It has also sent science counsellors to third countries to strengthen dialogue and cooperation. Cooperation mainly takes place through the framework programme for research and innovation (known as 'Horizon 2020'). Through their association with Horizon 2020, 13 non-EU countries enjoy the same conditions for participation as Member States, and EU funds can be provided to third countries through targeted calls for proposals. However, industrialised and BRIC countries are usually required to fund their institutions' participation. The Directorate for International Cooperation within the European Commission's Directorate-General for Research and Innovation manages the preparation and implementation of the EU strategy for scientific cooperation. The Strategic Forum for International Science and Technology Cooperation (SFIC) provides a platform for Member States to establish a common strategy for scientific cooperation with selected countries, and advises the Council and the Commission.

Scientific cooperation with third countries aims to strengthen the European Union's attractiveness and competitiveness, tackle global societal challenges and support EU external policies. Science diplomacy is also an increasingly important tool to ease cooperation with third countries. The EU strategy for international scientific cooperation focuses on two dimensions. First, the research programmes carried out by the EU are open to participation by research institutions and researchers worldwide. Second, the EU is developing targeted strategies – multiannual roadmaps – with selected countries in order to achieve specific objectives. To support scientific cooperation, the EU has signed international agreements with 20 countries to provide a framework for bilateral cooperation. It has also sent science counsellors to third countries to strengthen dialogue and cooperation. Cooperation mainly takes place through the framework programme for research and innovation (known as 'Horizon 2020'). Through their association with Horizon 2020, 13 non-EU countries enjoy the same conditions for participation as Member States, and EU funds can be provided to third countries through targeted calls for proposals. However, industrialised and BRIC countries are usually required to fund their institutions' participation. The Directorate for International Cooperation within the European Commission's Directorate-General for Research and Innovation manages the preparation and implementation of the EU strategy for scientific cooperation. The Strategic Forum for International Science and Technology Cooperation (SFIC) provides a platform for Member States to establish a common strategy for scientific cooperation with selected countries, and advises the Council and the Commission.