Developing an EU Internal Security Strategy, Fighting Terrorism and Organised Crime

15-11-2011

The present study examines the steps taken since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty in the field of internal security and assesses commitments made in the areas of fundamental rights and civil liberties. The study examines the development of the EU Internal Security Strategy, with special attention paid to fighting terrorism and organised crime. It also investigates the activities of the main EU agencies involved in internal security policies. The study finally sketches out the key challenges lying ahead for EU internal security policies, with particular consideration paid to the role that the European Parliament will be called upon to play.

The present study examines the steps taken since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty in the field of internal security and assesses commitments made in the areas of fundamental rights and civil liberties. The study examines the development of the EU Internal Security Strategy, with special attention paid to fighting terrorism and organised crime. It also investigates the activities of the main EU agencies involved in internal security policies. The study finally sketches out the key challenges lying ahead for EU internal security policies, with particular consideration paid to the role that the European Parliament will be called upon to play.

External author

Amandine Scherrer (Centre d’Etudes sur les Conflits, Paris), Julien Jeandesboz (King’s College, London) and Emmanuel-Pierre Guittet (University of Manchester, UK) Under the coordination of the Centre d’Etudes sur les Conflits (C&C) and of the Justice and Home Affairs Section of the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS)