8

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The New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Africa

16-11-2015

The New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Africa (NAFSN) launched in May 2012 under the auspices of the G8 aims to create the conditions that will allow the African countries concerned to improve agricultural productivity and develop their agrifood sector by attracting more private investment in agriculture. The participating countries (Burkina Faso, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal and Tanzania) adopted 'country cooperation frameworks' (CCFs) ...

The New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Africa (NAFSN) launched in May 2012 under the auspices of the G8 aims to create the conditions that will allow the African countries concerned to improve agricultural productivity and develop their agrifood sector by attracting more private investment in agriculture. The participating countries (Burkina Faso, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal and Tanzania) adopted 'country cooperation frameworks' (CCFs) listing their policy commitments, and companies provided 'Letters of Intent' identifying intended investments. While the general objective of the NAFSN is sound, certain deficiencies remain: the CCFs are silent on the need to shift to sustainable modes of agricultural production and to support farmers' seed systems, on the dangers associated with the emergence of a market for land rights, or on the regulation of contract farming; and they are weak on nutrition as well as on the recognition of women's rights and gender empowerment.

External author

Olivier DE SCHUTTER (University of Louvain - UCL, Centre for Philosophy of Law - CPDR, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Legal Sciences - JUR-I, Belgium)

Research on: Regulating Agricultural Derivatives Markets

15-11-2013

After years of financial deregulation, the agricultural commodity price shocks of 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 acted as a catalyst for governments to strengthen the regulation of derivatives markets. It is increasingly recognised, at national and international levels, that financial players influence the volatility of commodity prices on exchanges and in spot markets. Reforms of the legal framework of futures markets are being carried out to: - Provide additional transparency requirements in agriculture ...

After years of financial deregulation, the agricultural commodity price shocks of 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 acted as a catalyst for governments to strengthen the regulation of derivatives markets. It is increasingly recognised, at national and international levels, that financial players influence the volatility of commodity prices on exchanges and in spot markets. Reforms of the legal framework of futures markets are being carried out to: - Provide additional transparency requirements in agriculture derivatives market - Guarantee broad market information on the physical (spot) markets - Impose position limits on several agricultural commodities - Reinforce regulators' powers

G20 Talks: Latest Developments on Food Security

15-07-2013

Around 1 billion people suffer from chronic undernourishment. Food security is a complex phenomenon, and the main priority is contributing to understanding which environmental and specific factors could affect the state of food security and the exposure to price shock in the international food market. The role played by Global Actors (e.g. G8 and G20) is crucial. After briefly outlining the food security global governance system, mentioning the recent initiatives within and outside the G20 framework ...

Around 1 billion people suffer from chronic undernourishment. Food security is a complex phenomenon, and the main priority is contributing to understanding which environmental and specific factors could affect the state of food security and the exposure to price shock in the international food market. The role played by Global Actors (e.g. G8 and G20) is crucial. After briefly outlining the food security global governance system, mentioning the recent initiatives within and outside the G20 framework, we assess the concrete results achieved to improve food security.

External author

Fabian Capitanio (University of Naples Federico II, Italy)

Proceedings of the Workshop "Sustainable Biofuels: Addressing Indirect Land Use Change"

15-02-2013

Further to the publication of a new legislative proposal addressing the emissions from indirect land-use change (ILUC) and amending the Directives on Fuel Quality (Directive 98/70/EC) and Renewable Energy (Directive 2009/28/EC) by the European Commission in October 2012, the Coordinators of the ENVI Committee requested the organisation of a workshop on this issue. The workshop consisted of an exchange of views with representatives of EU institutions, research institutes, biofuels industry, NGOs and ...

Further to the publication of a new legislative proposal addressing the emissions from indirect land-use change (ILUC) and amending the Directives on Fuel Quality (Directive 98/70/EC) and Renewable Energy (Directive 2009/28/EC) by the European Commission in October 2012, the Coordinators of the ENVI Committee requested the organisation of a workshop on this issue. The workshop consisted of an exchange of views with representatives of EU institutions, research institutes, biofuels industry, NGOs and other stakeholders. The first part was aimed at presenting the European Commission's proposal and providing scientific input on the assessment of the impacts of ILUC. The second part introduced policy options on the table and future perspectives from the point of view of industry and NGOs. The workshop was co-chaired by MEPs Corinne Lepage (ENVI rapporteur) and Alejo Vidal-Quadras (ITRE rapporteur). EU Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard held the keynote speech. This report summarises the presentations, discussions and conclusions.

External author

ICEDD (Institut de Conseil et d'Etudes en Développement Durable) Maria José LOPEZ, Yves MARENNE, Marco ORSINI

Research on: biofuels

15-01-2013

In the past decade, the demand for biofuels has steadily increased, at a global level and in the EU. The main biofuels currently on the market are “first-generation biofuels”, i.e. derived from agricultural feedstocks. The most widely used biofuels are by far biodiesel and bioethanol. Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils (such as rapeseed, sunflower seed and soybean oils) or animal fats. Bioethanol is obtained through the fermentation of sugars into alcohol, using for example sugar beet, maize ...

In the past decade, the demand for biofuels has steadily increased, at a global level and in the EU. The main biofuels currently on the market are “first-generation biofuels”, i.e. derived from agricultural feedstocks. The most widely used biofuels are by far biodiesel and bioethanol. Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils (such as rapeseed, sunflower seed and soybean oils) or animal fats. Bioethanol is obtained through the fermentation of sugars into alcohol, using for example sugar beet, maize or wheat. The so-called “second-generation biofuels” (i.e. originating from the processing of ligno-cellulosic feedstock such as straw and forest residues) are not yet well developed.

Food supply chain

13-01-2012

Recent shifts in prices have focused policy attention on the food supply chain: the path food takes from producers to consumers.

Recent shifts in prices have focused policy attention on the food supply chain: the path food takes from producers to consumers.

Production and Use of Biofuels in Developing Countries

04-05-2009

Executive summary This brief examines some of the key issues surrounding biofuels and developing countries and makes recommendations for European Union policy to prevent or limit damage from biofuel development, and to take advantage of opportunities. [...]

Executive summary This brief examines some of the key issues surrounding biofuels and developing countries and makes recommendations for European Union policy to prevent or limit damage from biofuel development, and to take advantage of opportunities. [...]

External author

Steve Wiggins and Chris Stevens (Overseas Development Institute) ; Ruth Nussbaum and Kate Bottriell (ProForest)

The CAP in the Face of the Economic and Financial Crisis

16-03-2009

Introduction When the US real estate bubble burst between 2007 and 2008, it signalled the start of a major international financial crisis leading to economic recession worldwide. It is now clear that the deterioration of the macroeconomic fabric all over the world is of a size and a duration not seen since 1929. It is against this backdrop that the current economic and financial crisis is disrupting a number of the parameters of the common agricultural policy (CAP): - Consideration must firstly be ...

Introduction When the US real estate bubble burst between 2007 and 2008, it signalled the start of a major international financial crisis leading to economic recession worldwide. It is now clear that the deterioration of the macroeconomic fabric all over the world is of a size and a duration not seen since 1929. It is against this backdrop that the current economic and financial crisis is disrupting a number of the parameters of the common agricultural policy (CAP): - Consideration must firstly be taken of the impact of the recession on the trend of agricultural commodity markets, and most particularly on world food demand. Within this context it may now be perceived that the crisis has put an end to the commodities bubble prevailing between 2006 and 2008, and world prices for agricultural products and food have already dropped to pre-2006 levels. - The crisis is likewise affecting various sectors and trends in agricultural production costs and revenue, which reassert the stabilising role of CAP aid. - Lastly, some account must be taken of the (asymmetric but global) impact on public finances, on the Community budget (in terms of own resources and expenditure) or on national budgets; an impact that may even force a review of the multiannual financial perspective in force (2007/2013) and seriously affect negotiation of the EU’s future financial framework. The sway held by the CAP over the Community budget could well have a major impact on the future expenditure allocated to agriculture. Moreover, increases in public debt and spending commitments already in place at national level to tackle the economic and banking crisis weaken the Member States’ cofinancing capacity.

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