12

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Keyword
Date

Research for AGRI Committee - Urban and peri-urban Agriculture in the EU

16-04-2018

This study presents a state of the art overview on urban agriculture and peri-urban agriculture (UPUA), the diversity of phenomena, motivations, distinctive features, benefits and limitations. UPUA is contextualized in relation to societal and economic transformations, EU strategic objectives, policies and regional food system approaches. Using best practice examples, the study demonstrates the need for an improved integration of UPUA into the policy agenda across sectors, domains and governance ...

This study presents a state of the art overview on urban agriculture and peri-urban agriculture (UPUA), the diversity of phenomena, motivations, distinctive features, benefits and limitations. UPUA is contextualized in relation to societal and economic transformations, EU strategic objectives, policies and regional food system approaches. Using best practice examples, the study demonstrates the need for an improved integration of UPUA into the policy agenda across sectors, domains and governance levels.

External author

A. Piorr, I. Zasada, A. Doernberg, F. Zoll, W. Ramme (Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)

Integrated territorial investment – Implementation and future prospects

07-03-2018

An optional territorial development tool, integrated territorial investments (ITIs) make it possible to combine resources from the European Social Fund, European Regional Development Fund or Cohesion Fund under priority axes of one or more operational programmes. While ITIs may be used to implement sustainable urban development as well as other territorial strategies, they also allow Member States to delegate management tasks to the local level. Their take-up in the current period, however, has been ...

An optional territorial development tool, integrated territorial investments (ITIs) make it possible to combine resources from the European Social Fund, European Regional Development Fund or Cohesion Fund under priority axes of one or more operational programmes. While ITIs may be used to implement sustainable urban development as well as other territorial strategies, they also allow Member States to delegate management tasks to the local level. Their take-up in the current period, however, has been relatively low, leading to questions regarding their current form. Commentators have highlighted a number of obstacles to implementing ITIs, such as their complex structure, the administrative burden they represent for local authorities and the reluctance of many Member States to delegate responsibilities to the local level, with the European Parliament also adopting a resolution on this topic in 2016. There is clearly room for improvement and the current discussions on the future cohesion policy framework provide fresh impetus to further develop this tool. Stakeholders have put forward a number of proposals, finding common ground on issues such as ensuring the wider use of ITIs and a place-based approach, the need for greater simplification, and the importance of strengthening the sub-delegation of powers to involve the local level more in selecting projects. With a commitment to maintaining a key role for cohesion policy in the EU budget after 2020, the Bulgarian Council Presidency has made this policy one of its priorities. Yet in a context of increasing budgetary pressure, it remains unclear whether Member States will wish to strengthen a tool that devolves greater power, at some financial risk, to the local level.

Urban agriculture in Europe: Patterns, challenges and policies

18-12-2017

It is estimated that by 2050, 67 % of the world's population will live in urban areas. Increasing concerns over food security coupled with concerns over climate change have helped to promote interest in urban agriculture and the role it can play in respect of food security. The present paper aims to provide an overview of urban agriculture by examining it as it relates to issues of food security, the economy, social dimensions and the environment. Using short case studies and drawing on research ...

It is estimated that by 2050, 67 % of the world's population will live in urban areas. Increasing concerns over food security coupled with concerns over climate change have helped to promote interest in urban agriculture and the role it can play in respect of food security. The present paper aims to provide an overview of urban agriculture by examining it as it relates to issues of food security, the economy, social dimensions and the environment. Using short case studies and drawing on research from both Europe and the USA, the paper further explores the potential impact that urban agriculture can have and sets out its policy context. Looking to the future, one of the many challenges facing urban agriculture will be how it will achieve the necessary integration across all relevant EU policy areas.

THE ROLE OF CITIES IN THE INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

06-10-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, examines the role of cities in the institutional framework of the European Union and shows their limits and opportunities to engage effectively in policy-making at the EU level.

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, examines the role of cities in the institutional framework of the European Union and shows their limits and opportunities to engage effectively in policy-making at the EU level.

External author

Prof. Dr. Hubert HEINELT, Institute of Political Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany

Study in Focus - Implementation: Ambient Air Quality

15-06-2016

Exposure to elevated air pollution levels has substantial negative impacts on human health and the environment. The main pollutants are particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). The Ambient Air Quality Directive therefore sets limit and target values for the concentration of air pollutants. Thresholds for particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are exceeded in several Member States.

Exposure to elevated air pollution levels has substantial negative impacts on human health and the environment. The main pollutants are particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). The Ambient Air Quality Directive therefore sets limit and target values for the concentration of air pollutants. Thresholds for particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are exceeded in several Member States.

The urban dimension of EU policies

02-09-2015

Towns and cities are home to over 70% of the EU's population, and many of the economic and environmental policy challenges facing Europe have an urban dimension. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at intergovernmental level. Over recent years there have been increasing calls for concrete actions at EU level and for the development of an EU urban agenda, which could facilitate greater coherence in policies affecting urban areas and give city authorities and ...

Towns and cities are home to over 70% of the EU's population, and many of the economic and environmental policy challenges facing Europe have an urban dimension. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at intergovernmental level. Over recent years there have been increasing calls for concrete actions at EU level and for the development of an EU urban agenda, which could facilitate greater coherence in policies affecting urban areas and give city authorities and stakeholders a greater input in decision-making processes.

Developing an EU urban agenda

09-07-2015

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level. At the same time there have been increasing calls for concrete action and the development of an EU Urban Agenda to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in the process. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched ...

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level. At the same time there have been increasing calls for concrete action and the development of an EU Urban Agenda to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in the process. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched a public consultation following its July 2014 Communication on the Urban Dimension of EU policies. Its findings indicate broad support among city stakeholders for an EU Urban Agenda. The European Parliament has also prepared a draft report on the issue as part of this process, which is due to be debated at the September plenary session. The revised 2014-20 Cohesion Policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to increase the role of cities in cohesion programming and implementation and thus enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding. Analysis of the operational programmes prepared thus far, however, reveals a low uptake of these instruments by the Member States, calling into question the commitment of national governments to the urban agenda. While the debate progresses, Member States continue to differ in terms of their vision of an EU Urban Agenda and the means to implement it. The EP has actively participated in this debate and aims to make a valuable contribution to the efforts of future presidencies to reach consensus and move the process forward.

Regional Strategies for Industrial Areas

15-01-2013

Urban areas with a legacy of “old industries” have faced large-scale investment needs in the regeneration of derelict land, rehabilitation of housing and infrastructure and in addressing ecological challenges, in addition to massive changes in economic activities and jobs. Cohesion policy has contributed to rehabilitation and new development. These regions depend on national and European industrial policy as well as on the capacity of local and regional actors to plan and develop a new and amenable ...

Urban areas with a legacy of “old industries” have faced large-scale investment needs in the regeneration of derelict land, rehabilitation of housing and infrastructure and in addressing ecological challenges, in addition to massive changes in economic activities and jobs. Cohesion policy has contributed to rehabilitation and new development. These regions depend on national and European industrial policy as well as on the capacity of local and regional actors to plan and develop a new and amenable space and a base for future economic development. This briefing note explains how urban areas like Manchester, Essen, Lille and Bilbao have mastered reconversion. In the future, urban areas could greatly benefit from the new possibilities offered through the Integrated Territorial Investment foreseen for the upcoming Cohesion policy period, 2014-2020.

External author

Herta Tödtling-Schönhofer (Metis GmbH) and Sara Davies (EPRC)

Integrated Urban Transport Plans and Cohesion Policy

15-11-2012

The study deals with the interaction between integrated urban transport plans (sustainable urban mobility/transport plans, SUMP) and the cohesion policy of the European Union. After tackling the concept of SUMP and the role of transport/urban transport in cohesion policy, eight case studies analyse the link between integrated urban transport planning and funding for transport policies/projects by cohesion policy. Finally, the study provides policy recommendations including on the 2011 cohesion policy ...

The study deals with the interaction between integrated urban transport plans (sustainable urban mobility/transport plans, SUMP) and the cohesion policy of the European Union. After tackling the concept of SUMP and the role of transport/urban transport in cohesion policy, eight case studies analyse the link between integrated urban transport planning and funding for transport policies/projects by cohesion policy. Finally, the study provides policy recommendations including on the 2011 cohesion policy reform proposals.

External author

Stefan Klug, Wolfgang Schade and André Kühn (Fraunhofer Institute for System and Innovation Research ISI) , Bettina Kampman and Arno Schroten (CE Delft) , Samantha Jones and David Blackledge (Transport and Travel Research Ltd - TTR)

A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE AND PUBLIC-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS FOR URBAN WATER SERVICES IN ACP COUNTRIES

27-05-2010

This study evaluates the comparative advantages of PPPs and PuPs in urban water services. Based on literature analysis and case studies, past performance of PPPs and PuPs is reviewed against several criteria. Lessons are then identified regarding the barriers and enablers which determine the success of partnerships, and the kind of support donors could usefully provide. The study concludes that while the main determinant of performance is not public or private management but policy, institutions, ...

This study evaluates the comparative advantages of PPPs and PuPs in urban water services. Based on literature analysis and case studies, past performance of PPPs and PuPs is reviewed against several criteria. Lessons are then identified regarding the barriers and enablers which determine the success of partnerships, and the kind of support donors could usefully provide. The study concludes that while the main determinant of performance is not public or private management but policy, institutions, finance and regulation, there are notable differences between what PPPs and PuPs can offer. In the right circumstances the private sector can improve in efficiency and management, but at high costs. PuPs generally have lower costs and greater focus on capacity building and equity, and have the potential to support more holistic approaches to urban services and the water cycle. Partnerships with local actors can also improve services by allowing more flexible approaches to service provision to meet the needs of different households. The involvement of civil society and community groups in particular often helps to improve services for poor households. A key conclusion is that governments should have a choice of different partnership options and the ability to end failing partnerships.

External author

Josephine TUCKER, Research Officer, Overseas Development Institute, UK ; Roger CALOW, Research Fellow, Overseas Development Institute, UK ; Darla NICKEL, Ecologic Institute, Austria ; Thomas THALER, Researcher, Ecologic Institute, Austria

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