25

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Date

CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles

30-08-2019

In May 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation setting the first-ever CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles in the EU, as part of the third mobility package. It would require the average CO2 emissions from new trucks in 2025 to be 15 % lower than in 2019. For 2030, the proposal sets an indicative reduction target of at least 30 % compared to 2019. Special incentives are provided for zero- and low-emission vehicles. The proposed regulation applies to four categories of ...

In May 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation setting the first-ever CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles in the EU, as part of the third mobility package. It would require the average CO2 emissions from new trucks in 2025 to be 15 % lower than in 2019. For 2030, the proposal sets an indicative reduction target of at least 30 % compared to 2019. Special incentives are provided for zero- and low-emission vehicles. The proposed regulation applies to four categories of large trucks, which together account for 65 %-70 % of CO2 emissions from heavy-duty vehicles. The Commission proposes to review the legislation in 2022 in order to set a binding target for 2030, and to extend its application to smaller trucks, buses, coaches and trailers. In the European Parliament, the proposal was referred to the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, which adopted its report on 18 October 2018. Parliament voted on the report on 14 November. Trilogue negotiations were concluded on 18 February 2019 with an agreement that sets a legally binding 30 % reduction target for the average fleet emissions of new trucks by 2030. The Parliament adopted it during the April II 2019 plenary session, and the Council on 13 June. The Regulation was published in the Official Journal on 25 July and entered into force on 14 August 2019.

Review of CO2 emission standards for new cars and vans

31-01-2018

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 8 November 2017 and referred to European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI). According to the IA, road transport caused 22 % of all EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2015, 73 % of which came from cars and vans (IA, p. 19). The transport sector (except for aviation) is not covered by ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 8 November 2017 and referred to European Parliament's Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI). According to the IA, road transport caused 22 % of all EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2015, 73 % of which came from cars and vans (IA, p. 19). The transport sector (except for aviation) is not covered by the EU's emissions trading system (ETS), adopted in 2005 in the context of international efforts to reduce GHG. Instead, the EU has put sector-specific legislation in place, in particular to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. When it became clear that a 1999 voluntary emissions reduction agreement between the European Commission and the Association of European Automobile Manufacturers had not delivered, the EU adopted two regulations on mandatory CO2 standards for all new passenger cars and vans, in 2009 and 2011 respectively. Both were amended in 2014 with new emissions targets. After the Paris Agreement, countries such as China, the United States of America (USA) and Japan quickly began implementing ambitious policies for low-carbon transport. To comply with the agreement, the EU included the proposal to amend the current legislation in the European Commission's 2017 work programme. The review of the current regulations started in 2015, with publication of the European Commission's extensive ex-post evaluation. It found the current regulations effective and more efficient than expected, but also identified weaknesses. These included the measurement of emissions (test procedures), the utility parameter (mass or footprint) and emissions from energy and vehicle production, currently not covered (IA, pp. 15-16). As announced in its May 2017 communication, Europe on the Move, the Commission is pursuing an integrated approach to address all factors and actors relevant for CO2 emissions, from environment to industry (IA, p. 11). This proposal is therefore part of a comprehensive legislative package aiming to ensure 'clean, competitive and connected mobility for all' (IA, pp. 11-12, 17) and is flanked by important initiatives such as the EU action plan on alternative fuels infrastructure, revision of the Clean Vehicles Directive and the battery initiative.

LIBE legislative mapping - Systematic overview of EU legislation on Civil liberties, Justice and Home affairs

28-08-2017

The European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs is developing the LIBE Legislative Mapping Project, in cooperation with the Secretariat of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE). This long-term project consists of a comprehensive up-to-date overview of existing and emerging EU legislation and related information in the field of justice and home affairs (JHA) in the form of an online tool for MEPs and their staff.

The European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs is developing the LIBE Legislative Mapping Project, in cooperation with the Secretariat of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE). This long-term project consists of a comprehensive up-to-date overview of existing and emerging EU legislation and related information in the field of justice and home affairs (JHA) in the form of an online tool for MEPs and their staff.

Research for CULT Committee - Europe for Citizens: New Programme Implementation – First Experiences

07-07-2016

The present study is intended to research first experiences with the implementation of the Europe for Citizens (EfC) programme 2014–2020. The study provides an overview of the current implementation of the programme and aims to contribute to an understanding of what works well in the present iteration of the EfC programme and what are the main areas of concern for applicants and beneficiaries. The analysis is based on 24 interviews with the National Contact Points of the Programme, located in the ...

The present study is intended to research first experiences with the implementation of the Europe for Citizens (EfC) programme 2014–2020. The study provides an overview of the current implementation of the programme and aims to contribute to an understanding of what works well in the present iteration of the EfC programme and what are the main areas of concern for applicants and beneficiaries. The analysis is based on 24 interviews with the National Contact Points of the Programme, located in the Member States.

External author

Irina JEFFERIES and Bradford ROHMER

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - July 2016

04-07-2016

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Evaluation in the European Commission: Rolling Check-List and State of Play

26-11-2015

This research paper aims to provide an overview of planned and ongoing evaluations of EU legislation and spending programmes carried out by each European Commission Directorate-General (DG). The general overview and state of play on the public availability of evaluations is completed by a Rolling Check-List comprising the on-going and planned evaluations on the basis of information disclosed by the Commission in various sources (DGs' Annual Management Plans, the Single Evaluation Plan, and Roadmaps ...

This research paper aims to provide an overview of planned and ongoing evaluations of EU legislation and spending programmes carried out by each European Commission Directorate-General (DG). The general overview and state of play on the public availability of evaluations is completed by a Rolling Check-List comprising the on-going and planned evaluations on the basis of information disclosed by the Commission in various sources (DGs' Annual Management Plans, the Single Evaluation Plan, and Roadmaps published since July 2015) and the information available in individual DGs. The annexes to this research paper contain an overview and links to the DGs Management Plans for 2014 (Annex I) and DGs Management Plans for 2015 (Annex II), the contact details (where available) of the evaluation function in each DG (Annex III); finally Annexes IV and V provide a list of and direct links to the evaluations published in 2014 and until 31 October, 2015 on the Commission's database of completed evaluations.

Institutional and Constitutional Aspects of Special Interest Representation

15-06-2015

The European Parliament is lobbied by growing numbers of special interests; their activity is greater in Committees dealing with issues on integration & regulation, and procedures under OLP, CNS and INI. Significantly, the density and diversity of accredited interests across committees mirrors patterns observed in registered groups across Commission DGs. Based on a survey of MEPs the report notes variation in the activity of interest groups across the policy cycle while influential groups are considered ...

The European Parliament is lobbied by growing numbers of special interests; their activity is greater in Committees dealing with issues on integration & regulation, and procedures under OLP, CNS and INI. Significantly, the density and diversity of accredited interests across committees mirrors patterns observed in registered groups across Commission DGs. Based on a survey of MEPs the report notes variation in the activity of interest groups across the policy cycle while influential groups are considered those that provide a mix of European level technical and political expertise; overall the Transparency Register is considered to improve the behaviour of interest representatives.

External author

David Coen and Alexander Katsaitis (School of Public Policy, University College London, the UK)

Financing the EU Budget: What Does the Academic World Tell Us?

15-04-2015

The European Parliament’s position advocating a reform of the current revenue system and more genuine own resources to finance the EU budget appears to be strongly backed by academic research. There is a broad consensus that the current system to feed the EU budget is no longer viable. National contributions currently account for more or less 85% of the budget. The net payer debate is seen as misleading and polluting discussions on the EU budget. The accounting calculations on which it is based ...

The European Parliament’s position advocating a reform of the current revenue system and more genuine own resources to finance the EU budget appears to be strongly backed by academic research. There is a broad consensus that the current system to feed the EU budget is no longer viable. National contributions currently account for more or less 85% of the budget. The net payer debate is seen as misleading and polluting discussions on the EU budget. The accounting calculations on which it is based are arbitrary and do not reflect the real net benefits and costs of the EU budget. Academic research provides numerous analyses of the best options to reform the current system of own resources and to bring back the GNI resource to its initial balancing role. As Andreis and Marè (2014) stated in their conclusions, the EU budget is a key condition for the evolution of European integration, and also part of the debate on the legitimacy of the Union’s action. Indeed, debating the EU budget is actually discussing competing visions of Europe’s future. Therefore, an agreement on the future of the EU is a pre-condition for resolving the issue of financing the EU budget.

Comparative Study on Access to Documents (and Confidentiality Rules) in International Trade Negotiations

10-04-2015

It is extremely difficult to strengthen parliamentary oversight of the EU’s trade policies without clear and predictable rules and procedures for the EP to access relevant information from the Commission and the Council. This study provides an overview on the rules guaranteeing access to information in international trade negotiations both in the EU and in selected third countries. It evaluates the existing arrangements on access to information by Parliament in view of the provisions included in ...

It is extremely difficult to strengthen parliamentary oversight of the EU’s trade policies without clear and predictable rules and procedures for the EP to access relevant information from the Commission and the Council. This study provides an overview on the rules guaranteeing access to information in international trade negotiations both in the EU and in selected third countries. It evaluates the existing arrangements on access to information by Parliament in view of the provisions included in the Treaty of Lisbon, international norms and agreements, EU case-law, and similar rules, arrangements and practices in a group of national parliaments.

Openness, Transparency and Access to Documents and Information in the European Union

15-11-2013

The Treaty of Lisbon updates the terms under which the principles of transparency and openness clarify the right of public access to documents in the European Union. This right is both a fundamental right of individuals and an institutional principle. The revision of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, which sets out the arrangements for this, is influenced, to a large extent, by the numerous interpretations from the Court of Justice of the European Union, particularly during the last five years. Observation ...

The Treaty of Lisbon updates the terms under which the principles of transparency and openness clarify the right of public access to documents in the European Union. This right is both a fundamental right of individuals and an institutional principle. The revision of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, which sets out the arrangements for this, is influenced, to a large extent, by the numerous interpretations from the Court of Justice of the European Union, particularly during the last five years. Observation of the practice followed by the EU institutions and the broad lines of the practices followed nationally indicate that EU law needs to undergo extensive revision, with the aim of both leveraging the case law experience acquired and bringing itself up to date.

External author

Henri Labayle (Université de Pau et des pays de l’Adour, France)

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