22

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What if animal farming were not so bad for the environment?

08-02-2017

What options exist, especially in terms of new technologies, for reducing the carbon footprint of the livestock industry, how effective might they be, and what could be done to encourage their implementation? The livestock industry is responsible for around 14.5 % of global greenhouse gas emissions. The magnitude of this percentage is due to the emission of large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, which both result in greater global warming than carbon dioxide per gram of gas released. The main ...

What options exist, especially in terms of new technologies, for reducing the carbon footprint of the livestock industry, how effective might they be, and what could be done to encourage their implementation? The livestock industry is responsible for around 14.5 % of global greenhouse gas emissions. The magnitude of this percentage is due to the emission of large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, which both result in greater global warming than carbon dioxide per gram of gas released. The main cause of livestock methane emissions is the digestive process in ruminants, such as cattle and sheep. In these animals, food is fermented, generating methane which is burped out. Nitrous oxide is generated through the application of fertilisers for animal feed production. This is also the case with crops grown for human consumption, but, as most of the energy stored in crops is lost when they are fed to animals, emissions due to fertilisers are much greater per calorie of animal produce than of plant produce. Both gases are produced by the storage of manure and its application as a fertiliser. In addition, carbon dioxide is emitted through burning fossil fuels for purposes such as fertiliser production, operation of farm machinery and transport of goods.

The EU's General Food Law Regulation: An introduction to the founding principles and the fitness check

25-01-2017

The General Food Law Regulation (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002) was drafted following a series of food incidents in the EU in the late 1990s, including the BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) outbreak and the dioxin scare. It is the act underpinning current EU food and feed legislation and defines its general principles, requirements and aims. The regulation also established the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), an independent agency tasked with providing decision makers with scientific advice ...

The General Food Law Regulation (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002) was drafted following a series of food incidents in the EU in the late 1990s, including the BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) outbreak and the dioxin scare. It is the act underpinning current EU food and feed legislation and defines its general principles, requirements and aims. The regulation also established the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), an independent agency tasked with providing decision makers with scientific advice on food safety issues. Furthermore, the General Food Law Regulation lays down the main procedures for the management of emergencies and crises, including the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF), designed to enable a swift reaction when risks to public health are detected in the food chain. As part of its Better Regulation agenda, the European Commission is currently finalising its fitness check of the General Food Law Regulation. The review will assess the key components of this founding act. The results of the review are expected in the course of 2017.

Insects as a source of protein for aquaculture and animal feed

30-08-2016

Recent research projects and studies have concluded that insects may have the potential to serve as a sustainable source of protein for aquaculture and animal feed. For this potential to be pursued further, changes would be required in the current EU regulatory framework.

Recent research projects and studies have concluded that insects may have the potential to serve as a sustainable source of protein for aquaculture and animal feed. For this potential to be pursued further, changes would be required in the current EU regulatory framework.

Review of medicated feed legislation

21-06-2016

In 2014 the Commission presented a proposal for a regulation on medicated feed with the aim to update and harmonise rules which date from 1990. These rules are currently laid out in a directive, which would be repealed and replaced by a regulation. According to the Commission, the need to harmonise the production, marketing and use of medicated feed at EU level results from differences in national implementation that cause difficulties for producers and animal holders and create obstacles in the ...

In 2014 the Commission presented a proposal for a regulation on medicated feed with the aim to update and harmonise rules which date from 1990. These rules are currently laid out in a directive, which would be repealed and replaced by a regulation. According to the Commission, the need to harmonise the production, marketing and use of medicated feed at EU level results from differences in national implementation that cause difficulties for producers and animal holders and create obstacles in the single market. The revised provisions should also contribute to tackling the problem of antimicrobial resistance. Another aim would be to expand the scope of the regulation to pet animals to facilitate the availability of medicated feed for them. The legislation on medicated feed is strongly interrelated with the legislation on veterinary medicines. This proposal was therefore presented together with the draft regulation on veterinary medicinal products and legislative work on both acts is being coordinated to assure consistency between their provisions. On 15 March 2016, the Committee for Agriculture and Rural Development adopted its report on the proposal and decided to open interinstitutional negotiations.

Member States' possibility to 'opt out' from GM food and feed import authorisations

20-10-2015

In April 2015 the European Commission put forward a proposal that would allow the Member States to 'opt out' from using genetically modified (GM) crops authorised to be imported to the EU for food and feed purposes. The proposal has faced fierce opposition from different stakeholders, as well as Members of the European Parliament, with both the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) and the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) voting to reject the proposal ...

In April 2015 the European Commission put forward a proposal that would allow the Member States to 'opt out' from using genetically modified (GM) crops authorised to be imported to the EU for food and feed purposes. The proposal has faced fierce opposition from different stakeholders, as well as Members of the European Parliament, with both the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) and the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) voting to reject the proposal. The plenary vote is scheduled at the October III plenary.

Imports of GM food and feed: Right of Member States to opt out (third edition)

19-10-2015

All genetically modified organisms (GMOs) need authorisation before they can be placed on the EU market. However, a qualified majority among the Member States has never been reached either in favour of or against any authorisation proposal put forward by the Commission. The Commission has therefore concluded that the legal framework for decision-making on genetically modified (GM) food and feed needs to be adapted, and proposes to extend to GM food and feed the solution agreed by the European Parliament ...

All genetically modified organisms (GMOs) need authorisation before they can be placed on the EU market. However, a qualified majority among the Member States has never been reached either in favour of or against any authorisation proposal put forward by the Commission. The Commission has therefore concluded that the legal framework for decision-making on genetically modified (GM) food and feed needs to be adapted, and proposes to extend to GM food and feed the solution agreed by the European Parliament and the Council on GMO cultivation. The Member States would thus be allowed to restrict or prohibit the use of genetically modified food and feed on their territory, despite it being authorised at EU level. Stakeholders have been critical of the proposal, claiming that it jeopardises the internal market, would cause serious distortions to competition and leave measures taken by Member States vulnerable to legal challenge. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of 3 July 2015: PE 564.394.

Overview of the Agricultural Inputs Sector in the EU

15-07-2015

This study analyzes the seed, feed, energy, fertilizer, and plant protection agents farm input sectors from two perspectives: the demand side and the supply side. Average input shares in the EU-27 for seeds and fertilizers declined while they increased for feeds. Market concentration is the largest in the plant protection agents sector followed by the energy sector, and lowest in the feed sector.

This study analyzes the seed, feed, energy, fertilizer, and plant protection agents farm input sectors from two perspectives: the demand side and the supply side. Average input shares in the EU-27 for seeds and fertilizers declined while they increased for feeds. Market concentration is the largest in the plant protection agents sector followed by the energy sector, and lowest in the feed sector.

Autor externo

Justus Wesseler, Alessandro Bonanno, Dušan Drabik, Valentina C. Materia, Luca Malaguti, Marcel Meyer and Thomas J. Venus (Wageningen University, the netherlands)

Imports of GM food and feed - Right of Member States to opt out (second edition)

03-07-2015

All genetically modified organisms (GMOs) need authorisation before they can be placed on the EU market. However, a qualified majority among the Member States has never been reached either in favour of or against any authorisation proposal put forward by the Commission. The Commission has therefore concluded that the legal framework for decision-making on genetically modified (GM) food and feed needs to be adapted, and proposes to extend to GM food and feed the solution agreed by the European Parliament ...

All genetically modified organisms (GMOs) need authorisation before they can be placed on the EU market. However, a qualified majority among the Member States has never been reached either in favour of or against any authorisation proposal put forward by the Commission. The Commission has therefore concluded that the legal framework for decision-making on genetically modified (GM) food and feed needs to be adapted, and proposes to extend to GM food and feed the solution agreed by the European Parliament and the Council on GMO cultivation. The Member States would thus be allowed to restrict or prohibit the use of genetically modified food and feed on their territory, despite it being authorised at EU level. Stakeholders have been critical of the proposal, claiming that it jeopardises the internal market, would cause serious distortions to competition and leave measures taken by Member States vulnerable to legal challenge. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of 1 June 2015: PE 559.479. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Imports of GM food and feed - Right of Member States to opt out

01-06-2015

All genetically modified organisms (GMOs) need authorisation before they can be placed on the EU market. However, a qualified majority amongst the Member States has never been reached either in favour of or against any authorisation proposal put forward by the Commission. The Commission has therefore concluded that the legal framework for decision-making on genetically modified (GM) food and feed needs to be adapted, and proposes to extend to GM food and feed the solution agreed by the European Parliament ...

All genetically modified organisms (GMOs) need authorisation before they can be placed on the EU market. However, a qualified majority amongst the Member States has never been reached either in favour of or against any authorisation proposal put forward by the Commission. The Commission has therefore concluded that the legal framework for decision-making on genetically modified (GM) food and feed needs to be adapted, and proposes to extend to GM food and feed the solution agreed by the European Parliament and the Council on GMO cultivation. The Member States would thus be allowed to restrict or prohibit the use of genetically modified food and feed on their territory, despite it being authorised at EU level. Stakeholders have been critical of the proposal, claiming that it jeopardises the internal market, would cause serious distortions to competition and leave measures taken by Member States vulnerable to legal challenge. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Medicated feed: Initial Appraisal of a European Commission Impact Assessment

13-04-2015

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment (IA) accompanying the proposal for Regulation on the manufacture, placing on the market and use of medicated feed and repealing Council Directive 90/167/EEC (COM (2014) 556). This note, prepared by the Ex-Ante Impact Assessment Unit for the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) of the European Parliament, analyses whether the principal criteria laid down ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment (IA) accompanying the proposal for Regulation on the manufacture, placing on the market and use of medicated feed and repealing Council Directive 90/167/EEC (COM (2014) 556). This note, prepared by the Ex-Ante Impact Assessment Unit for the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) of the European Parliament, analyses whether the principal criteria laid down in the Commission’s own Impact Assessment Guidelines, as well as additional factors identified by the Parliament in its Impact Assessment Handbook, appear to be met by the IA.

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