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Nuclear decommissioning assistance

05-04-2017

Following the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the EU launched several nuclear decommissioning assistance programmes (NDAP) to help Bulgaria, Lithuania, and Slovakia safely close and dismantle their early Soviet-designed reactors while acceding to the EU. The NDAPs provide financial assistance for decommissioning, dismantling and waste management projects; energy-sector projects aimed at mitigating the consequences of reactor shutdowns; and projects addressing the socio-economic consequences of decommissioning ...

Following the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, the EU launched several nuclear decommissioning assistance programmes (NDAP) to help Bulgaria, Lithuania, and Slovakia safely close and dismantle their early Soviet-designed reactors while acceding to the EU. The NDAPs provide financial assistance for decommissioning, dismantling and waste management projects; energy-sector projects aimed at mitigating the consequences of reactor shutdowns; and projects addressing the socio-economic consequences of decommissioning. The European Commission estimates that between 1999 and 2020, financial support for the NDAP programmes will total approximately €3.8 billion.

Chernobyl 30 years on: Environmental and health effects

22-04-2016

In the early hours of 26 April 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the explosions it triggered caused a major release of nuclear radioactive material into the atmosphere. Radionuclides were scattered in the vicinity of the plant and over much of Europe. The Chernobyl fallout had a major impact on both agricultural and natural ecosystems in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, as well as in many other European countries. Radionuclides were taken up by plants and later by animals. In ...

In the early hours of 26 April 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the explosions it triggered caused a major release of nuclear radioactive material into the atmosphere. Radionuclides were scattered in the vicinity of the plant and over much of Europe. The Chernobyl fallout had a major impact on both agricultural and natural ecosystems in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, as well as in many other European countries. Radionuclides were taken up by plants and later by animals. In some areas, they were subsequently found in milk, meat, forest food products, freshwater fish and wood. Environmental impacts vary according to location and ecosystem. Forests and fresh water bodies have been among the most affected ecosystems. The impacts on wildlife in the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant are disputed. The impacts on human health have been extensively studied, although experts are not unanimous in their views. Official assessments by United Nations agencies have been challenged. The major population groups exposed were clean-up workers, evacuees and residents of contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. There has been no clear evidence of any measurable increase in radiation-induced adverse health effects in other European countries. The immediate and short-term effects resulting from heavy fallout exposure include radiation sickness and cataracts. Late effects are thyroid cancer, especially in children and adolescents, and leukaemia among exposed workers. The accident has also had important psychosocial effects.

Chernobyl 30 years on: The EU's response

05-04-2016

In the early hours of 26 April 1986, a test on the fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant resulted in a massive energy surge, which led to the biggest nuclear accident in history. Some 600 000 men participated in the containment operations, putting their lives at risk, and around 350 000 people were displaced in the years after the accident. Since 1986, the international community, led by the European Union, has been assisting Ukraine, Belarus and Russia in dealing with the far-reaching ...

In the early hours of 26 April 1986, a test on the fourth reactor of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant resulted in a massive energy surge, which led to the biggest nuclear accident in history. Some 600 000 men participated in the containment operations, putting their lives at risk, and around 350 000 people were displaced in the years after the accident. Since 1986, the international community, led by the European Union, has been assisting Ukraine, Belarus and Russia in dealing with the far-reaching consequences of Chernobyl. The EU is the main donor to the two post-Chernobyl accounts of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and funds major remediation projects, including the building of a new sarcophagus for the reactor. With its expertise amassed over the past 30 years, the EU has been extending its assistance in the field of security and cooperation to more and more countries in the world, in particular, to Belarus, Russia, Armenia and China.

Fisheries in Japan

15-01-2014

Japan is one of the world's most important consumers of fishery products. Fisheries traditionally play a considerable role in its food supply and form a key element of the regional economies in coastal areas. Japan has developed its own set of values and habits in terms of fisheries practices, along with an elaborate fisheries management system. This note provides an overview of fisheries activities in Japan and reviews some specific aspects of this highly complex sector.

Japan is one of the world's most important consumers of fishery products. Fisheries traditionally play a considerable role in its food supply and form a key element of the regional economies in coastal areas. Japan has developed its own set of values and habits in terms of fisheries practices, along with an elaborate fisheries management system. This note provides an overview of fisheries activities in Japan and reviews some specific aspects of this highly complex sector.

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