5

tulos(ta)

Hakusana(t)
Julkaisutyyppi
Toimiala
Laatija
Hakusana
Päivämäärä

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

17-05-2016

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in May 2015.

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

19-05-2015

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is an updated version of a briefing published in November 2013.

EU Readmission Agreements: Facilitating the return of irregular migrants

24-04-2015

EU Readmission Agreements (EURAs) are based on reciprocal obligations and are concluded between the European Union and non-EU countries to facilitate the return of people residing irregularly in a country to their country of origin or to a country of transit. They operate alongside but take precedence over bilateral readmission agreements between individual EU Member States and non-EU countries. They are negotiated in a broader context where partner countries are usually granted visa facilitation ...

EU Readmission Agreements (EURAs) are based on reciprocal obligations and are concluded between the European Union and non-EU countries to facilitate the return of people residing irregularly in a country to their country of origin or to a country of transit. They operate alongside but take precedence over bilateral readmission agreements between individual EU Member States and non-EU countries. They are negotiated in a broader context where partner countries are usually granted visa facilitation and other incentives such as financial support for implementing the agreement or special trade conditions in exchange for readmitting people residing without authorisation in the EU. As such, they are crucial to the EU’s return policy, as defined in the Return Directive (Directive 2008/115/EC). The legal basis for concluding EURAs is Article 79(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). They are negotiated with the partner country on the basis of a negotiating mandate granted by the Council to the Commission. They are then concluded after the European Parliament has given its consent. Once they come into force, their effectiveness can vary significantly from country to country. In the past, the European Parliament (EP) has raised concerns that EURAs do not provide sufficient human-rights safeguards to ensure the protection of returnees at all times. The EURA with Albania (signed in 2005) was the first to reflect the EP's concerns about this insufficient reference to human rights.

European Asylum Support Office (EASO)

30-01-2015

The European Asylum Support Office (EASO) is an EU agency which provides tools to help Member States prepare for an influx of asylum applicants and to implement EU legislation in the field. It also supports Member States which face particular asylum-related pressures.

The European Asylum Support Office (EASO) is an EU agency which provides tools to help Member States prepare for an influx of asylum applicants and to implement EU legislation in the field. It also supports Member States which face particular asylum-related pressures.

Frontex – Management of Europe's borders

30-01-2015

Frontex is the Agency which helps those EU Member States facing strong migratory pressures to secure the EU's external borders, through coordinating deployment of equipment and border guards made available by Member States. In recent years, Frontex has managed a number of operations off the coasts of Greece, Italy and Spain, as well as on the Union's eastern land borders. With the continuing influx of migrants seeking to enter the Union by ever-increasing routes and methods, many experts underline ...

Frontex is the Agency which helps those EU Member States facing strong migratory pressures to secure the EU's external borders, through coordinating deployment of equipment and border guards made available by Member States. In recent years, Frontex has managed a number of operations off the coasts of Greece, Italy and Spain, as well as on the Union's eastern land borders. With the continuing influx of migrants seeking to enter the Union by ever-increasing routes and methods, many experts underline the limited resources available to Frontex and call on the EU and its Member States to increase their contributions to the Agency.

Tulevat tapahtumat

09-11-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | The revolutions of 1989-90 thirty years on [...]
Muu tapahtuma -
EPRS
09-11-2020
Sexual harassment in the EU institutions - Public Hearing
Kuulemistilaisuus -
FEMM
10-11-2020
The Annual Rule of Law Report by the Commission and the Role of National Parliaments
Muu tapahtuma -
LIBE

Kumppanit