16

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New civil aviation safety rules

15-10-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules and the rules have been in force since 11 September 2018. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 620.199, 28 March 2018.

New civil aviation safety rules

28-03-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. The provisional agreement now needs to be confirmed by Parliament in plenary. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 595.877, 12 January 2017.

New civil aviation safety rules

12-01-2017

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European ...

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to replace the current Regulation on civil aviation safety and the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The new proposal would introduce risk- and performance-based rules, close some safety gaps and interlinks safety more closely with other domains such as security and the environment. It proposes to strengthen EASA's role and take several measures to use existing resources more efficiently (e.g. sharing aviation inspectors). It also introduces essential requirements for drones. In November 2016, the European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism generally backed the updated rules, in particular the idea of regulating drones at EU level. The report constitutes Parliament’s position for negotiations with the Council, which adopted its general approach for the negotiations with the Parliament on 1 December 2016. This updates an earlier edition, of January 2016: PE 573.933. "A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html"

The International Civil Aviation Organization

24-10-2016

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). This is an update of an earlier edition of this 'at a glance' note, from May 2016.

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). This is an update of an earlier edition of this 'at a glance' note, from May 2016.

Research for TRAN Committee - Prospects for “Remote” En-Route Air Traffic Services

15-08-2016

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Remote tower services, where aircraft at an airport are remote-controlled from a separate location, have been introduced to some airports and are being tested at several others. By reviewing the current and emerging technologies, considering some of the risks associated with these technologies and evaluating the contribution of the NextGen and SESAR programmes, this paper aims to assess the feasibility of also providing “remote” en-route Air Traffic Services in Europe.

Ulkopuolinen laatija

Stephen Wainwright and Rosie Offord, Mark Scott (Steer Davies Gleave)

Airports in the EU: Challenges ahead

09-06-2016

With soaring passenger traffic and an increasing number of destinations and connections, air transport in the EU has been undergoing profound change in recent decades, impacting on airports as key players in the aviation value chain and civil aviation infrastructure. EU airports, which differ significantly in size and role, had to adapt following the liberalisation of the internal market for aviation; they now have commercial objectives and compete to attract and retain traffic. This analysis provides ...

With soaring passenger traffic and an increasing number of destinations and connections, air transport in the EU has been undergoing profound change in recent decades, impacting on airports as key players in the aviation value chain and civil aviation infrastructure. EU airports, which differ significantly in size and role, had to adapt following the liberalisation of the internal market for aviation; they now have commercial objectives and compete to attract and retain traffic. This analysis provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges confronting EU airports, beginning with an overview of historical developments up to today, and focusing in particular on connectivity issues, the economics of airports, and future trends. The second part looks at the measures taken by the EU to tackle the challenges facing airports, including the Commission's recent Aviation Strategy for Europe.

The International Civil Aviation Organization

13-05-2016

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Current Challenges and Future Prospects for EU Secondary Airports

15-05-2015

Around 250 European airports handle less than 5 million passengers per annum - a good one third of them less than 200,000. This analysis shows that all are affected by the changing structure of the airline industry, and that most of them are losing money. It also shows, however, that these similarities shall not mask the diversity of experience and circumstances, and the very different roles played by these airports.

Around 250 European airports handle less than 5 million passengers per annum - a good one third of them less than 200,000. This analysis shows that all are affected by the changing structure of the airline industry, and that most of them are losing money. It also shows, however, that these similarities shall not mask the diversity of experience and circumstances, and the very different roles played by these airports.

Ulkopuolinen laatija

John Strickland

Single European Sky

31-03-2015

Building on the achievements of the internal market and the need to cope with growth in air transport and congestion, the European Commission launched the Single European Sky (SES) initiative in 1999. Its core objective is to reform the architecture of air traffic control in the EU in order to meet future capacity and safety needs, through improving the overall performance of air traffic management and air navigation services. Two SES packages have been adopted: SES I, which set the principal legal ...

Building on the achievements of the internal market and the need to cope with growth in air transport and congestion, the European Commission launched the Single European Sky (SES) initiative in 1999. Its core objective is to reform the architecture of air traffic control in the EU in order to meet future capacity and safety needs, through improving the overall performance of air traffic management and air navigation services. Two SES packages have been adopted: SES I, which set the principal legal framework, and SES II, which aimed at tackling substantial air traffic growth, increasing safety, reducing costs and delays and the impact of air traffic on the environment. Nonetheless, European airspace remains heavily fragmented and SES is experiencing significant delays, in particular in terms of achievement of its performance goals and deployment of its basic elements such as 'functional airspace blocks'. In order to speed up its implementation, the Commission undertook a review of the SES legal framework, and in June 2013 presented an SES2+ package. While airline associations welcomed the initiative, trade unions have been much more critical on certain provisions. The European Parliament, which has underlined the need to push ahead with SES implementation, adopted its first reading position on the SES2+ package in March 2014. In December 2014, the outcome of the Transport Council somewhat reduced the ambitions of the Commission's initial objectives. However, progress on SES2+ remains blocked over the disputed question of its application to Gibraltar airport. The adoption of the package still requires the approval of both the Council and the European Parliament.

Single European sky: state of play

06-03-2014

More than ten years after its launch, the Single European Sky remains far from being in place. The costs of fragmentation of European airspace, coupled with the anticipated growth in traffic, have led the European Commission to launch recently an interim update of the Single European Sky rules, known as SES2+, in order to speed up implementation.

More than ten years after its launch, the Single European Sky remains far from being in place. The costs of fragmentation of European airspace, coupled with the anticipated growth in traffic, have led the European Commission to launch recently an interim update of the Single European Sky rules, known as SES2+, in order to speed up implementation.

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