14

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

A Just Transition Fund for climate-neutral EU regions

13-10-2020

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55 % by 2030, and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. The transition to clean energy will be a challenge for those regions highly dependent on fossil fuels and high-emission industries, in particular regions with a high level of employment in the coal sector. The new Just Transition Fund, complementing the existing cohesion policy funds, will provide support to address the social, economic and environmental impacts of the transition in the most ...

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55 % by 2030, and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. The transition to clean energy will be a challenge for those regions highly dependent on fossil fuels and high-emission industries, in particular regions with a high level of employment in the coal sector. The new Just Transition Fund, complementing the existing cohesion policy funds, will provide support to address the social, economic and environmental impacts of the transition in the most affected territories. This paper looks at the new fund and its allocation mechanism; it focuses on the EU coal industry and the potential for clean energy solutions in a selection of coal regions; and finally, it gives an overview of the level of greenhouse gas emissions in the EU by NUTS2 region.

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund 2021-2027

06-10-2020

As part of the next EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed a new regulation on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) in order to continue the support to the common fisheries policy and the integrated maritime policy. The new fund would give the Member States more flexibility in the implementation of the priorities. Small-scale coastal fisheries and outermost regions would receive greater preferential treatment. Support for permanent cessation and ...

As part of the next EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed a new regulation on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) in order to continue the support to the common fisheries policy and the integrated maritime policy. The new fund would give the Member States more flexibility in the implementation of the priorities. Small-scale coastal fisheries and outermost regions would receive greater preferential treatment. Support for permanent cessation and temporary cessation would be supported under strict conditions. It further proposes increased support for international ocean governance and stronger synergies with other EU policies. The fund is also expected to contribute to the development of the blue economy and support the EU's climate objectives. In reaction to the coronavirus crisis, the Commission published in May 2020 a revised multiannual financial framework proposal, significantly reducing the budget cut for the EMFF as compared to its initial proposal. Both Parliament and Council have agreed positions on the proposal, and trilogue negotiations started in November 2019. An important area of discussion is subsidies to fishing vessels, on which both co-legislators want to go further than the Commission proposal. The next trilogue meeting is scheduled for 29 October 2020. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure

Marketing of and trade in fishery and aquaculture products in the EU

14-07-2020

The European Union is the world's largest market for fishery and aquaculture products, with a total value of extra-EU imports and exports reaching €26.6 billion in 2018. The consumption of fish in the EU exceeded 24 kg per capita in 2017, with the highest consumption levels in Portugal and Spain. In terms of production, the EU-27, excluding the United Kingdom, ranks sixth globally. This includes catches taken by EU vessels on the high seas and in the waters of third countries. The EU's self sufficiency ...

The European Union is the world's largest market for fishery and aquaculture products, with a total value of extra-EU imports and exports reaching €26.6 billion in 2018. The consumption of fish in the EU exceeded 24 kg per capita in 2017, with the highest consumption levels in Portugal and Spain. In terms of production, the EU-27, excluding the United Kingdom, ranks sixth globally. This includes catches taken by EU vessels on the high seas and in the waters of third countries. The EU's self sufficiency ratio of 43 % in fishery and aquaculture products is rather low. As a result, internal demand is primarily met through imports. To ensure the supply of fish to the EU fish-processing industry, import duties are removed or reduced for a number of fishery products up to a specific annual import volume. In addition, products can enter the EU market, at zero or a reduced rate of duty, from countries with which the EU has a free trade agreement in force, or from developing countries that can export to the EU under the Generalised System of Preferences (GSP). In addition to tariffs, fish imports are subject to EU food hygiene regulations, which set out sanitary and phytosanitary requirements, and the EU's common fisheries policy (CFP). The CFP requirements include EU marketing standards − covering freshness and size categories − and specific labelling requirements that go beyond those required for other food products, for example the obligation to indicate the catch area and the main fishing gear used. Other market areas regulated by the EU cover the support and organisation of professional bodies and exemptions to competition rules. On the one hand, most market intervention mechanisms, such as withdrawal schemes and reference prices, have been removed since the most recent reform of the CFP in 2013. On the other hand, the EU fishing industry now has greater responsibility in the management of supply and demand. The submission of yearly production and marketing plans has become an obligation for all recognised producer organisations.

Three critical issues in EU-UK relations

08-06-2020

Following the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) on 1 February 2020, the EU and the UK launched negotiations on a new partnership agreement, to come into effect at the end of the transition period, scheduled for 31 December 2020. The negotiations are intended to address nearly all the domains covered in the Political Declaration negotiated by both parties alongside the Withdrawal Agreement, including trade and economics, fisheries, thematic cooperation, and internal ...

Following the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) on 1 February 2020, the EU and the UK launched negotiations on a new partnership agreement, to come into effect at the end of the transition period, scheduled for 31 December 2020. The negotiations are intended to address nearly all the domains covered in the Political Declaration negotiated by both parties alongside the Withdrawal Agreement, including trade and economics, fisheries, thematic cooperation, and internal and external security. As far as negotiations on the future economic relationship are concerned, while the parties agree in principle on an exceptional zero-tariff and zero-quota comprehensive and balanced free trade agreement (FTA) aiming for as 'frictionless' trade as possible, they still disagree on major aspects of the economic partnership, especially fisheries and level playing-field (LPF) commitments. The EU wants the future agreement in the fisheries domain to retain the status quo as far as possible, including reciprocal access to waters in return for access to markets and quota-shares that are based on historical fishing patterns. The EU also insists that an effective LPF would ensure fair competition. After the third round of talks, which took place in May 2020, the UK's chief negotiator, David Frost, said that the EU proposal on fisheries was ‘simply not realistic’, and it was unacceptable that the LPF binds the UK to EU law or standards; if need be, the UK would aim for a less ambitious FTA. The EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, said that negotiating an FTA providing for tariffs would be far more time-consuming, and the EU would still demand the same LPF commitments because 'open and fair competition is not a "nice-to-have", it is a "must-have" '. Following the fourth round of negotiations, from 2 to 5 June, the positions therefore still seemed irreconcilable. However, the long stand-off in the earlier negotiations on UK withdrawal had seemed equally irreconcilable before the final agreement was reached and then ratified. One area in which the two sides did manage to agree in those negotiations is the financial settlement included in the Withdrawal Agreement. While that settlement is now being implemented, it had initially been seen as one of the more difficult areas of the withdrawal negotiations.

World Oceans Day 2020

05-06-2020

Every year, 8 June marks World Oceans Day, celebrated since 1992 and officially designated by the United Nations in 2008. Its aim is to raise global awareness of the crucial role oceans play in sustaining life on earth and our duty to protect its rich marine biodiversity and to use its resources sustainably. This year's specific theme, 'Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean', highlights the need for innovative solutions to deal with the challenges oceans are facing. World Oceans Day also offers an opportunity ...

Every year, 8 June marks World Oceans Day, celebrated since 1992 and officially designated by the United Nations in 2008. Its aim is to raise global awareness of the crucial role oceans play in sustaining life on earth and our duty to protect its rich marine biodiversity and to use its resources sustainably. This year's specific theme, 'Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean', highlights the need for innovative solutions to deal with the challenges oceans are facing. World Oceans Day also offers an opportunity to take stock of progress, globally and in the EU.

Support for the fishing and aquaculture sectors in the coronavirus crisis

15-04-2020

Measures taken to limit the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, such as the closure of restaurants, open-air markets and limits on travel and tourism have had a strong impact on the food supply chain. Fisheries and aquaculture are among the sectors most immediately hit by the crisis. In order to alleviate the socio-economic impact, several measures have been or are in the process of being adopted by the EU. A number of emergency measures will help the fisheries and aquaculture sector, including increased ...

Measures taken to limit the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, such as the closure of restaurants, open-air markets and limits on travel and tourism have had a strong impact on the food supply chain. Fisheries and aquaculture are among the sectors most immediately hit by the crisis. In order to alleviate the socio-economic impact, several measures have been or are in the process of being adopted by the EU. A number of emergency measures will help the fisheries and aquaculture sector, including increased possibilities for State aid and the introduction of support measures through the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund.

L’économie bleue: Vue d’ensemble et cadre stratégique de l’Union européenne

30-01-2020

L’économie bleue englobe toutes les activités économiques relatives aux mers et aux océans. Elle emploie plus de 4 millions de personnes dans l’UE et son paysage évolue rapidement. Certains secteurs traditionnels sont en déclin tandis que d’autres, tant traditionnels qu’émergents, affichent un fort potentiel de croissance et d’innovation. Le présent document s’intéresse au cadre stratégique et aux différentes initiatives et actions de l’UE. Il donne une vue d’ensemble des «facilitateurs clés» transversaux ...

L’économie bleue englobe toutes les activités économiques relatives aux mers et aux océans. Elle emploie plus de 4 millions de personnes dans l’UE et son paysage évolue rapidement. Certains secteurs traditionnels sont en déclin tandis que d’autres, tant traditionnels qu’émergents, affichent un fort potentiel de croissance et d’innovation. Le présent document s’intéresse au cadre stratégique et aux différentes initiatives et actions de l’UE. Il donne une vue d’ensemble des «facilitateurs clés» transversaux ainsi qu’une analyse par secteur. Lorsqu’elle s’avère pertinente, la dimension internationale ou la position du Parlement européen est mise en évidence.

Support for fishermen affected by the eastern Baltic cod closure

17-01-2020

Eastern Baltic cod has long supported the livelihoods of many Baltic fishermen, but stocks of this valuable fish have been declining sharply in recent years. Every year since 2014, total allowable catches have been reduced accordingly. Recent scientific advice, published in May 2019, reinforced concerns regarding eastern Baltic cod, showing an even steeper decline and estimating the stock to be below safe biological limits for the past two years. Scientists point to high natural mortality resulting ...

Eastern Baltic cod has long supported the livelihoods of many Baltic fishermen, but stocks of this valuable fish have been declining sharply in recent years. Every year since 2014, total allowable catches have been reduced accordingly. Recent scientific advice, published in May 2019, reinforced concerns regarding eastern Baltic cod, showing an even steeper decline and estimating the stock to be below safe biological limits for the past two years. Scientists point to high natural mortality resulting from various environmental pressures, including a lack of salinity, little oxygen, pollution, high water temperatures and parasite infestation. On 22 July 2019, as an emergency measure, the Commission imposed an immediate closure of the fishery for six months, with the exception of a limited amount arising from the unavoidable by-catch. Subsequently, fishing opportunities for 2020 were cut by 92 %. As recovery of the stock is not expected before 2024, on 31 October 2019 the Commission issued a proposal amending the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Regulation in order to allow support for permanent cessation and introducing parallel changes to the Baltic multiannual plan by setting capacity limits for the fishing segments concerned and by including additional control and data collection measures.

Gouvernance des océans et croissance bleue: Enjeux, possibilités et réponses stratégiques

04-11-2019

Les océans recouvrent plus des deux tiers de la surface du globe et sont un élément primordial de la vie sur notre planète. En plus de constituer l'une des sources principales d’aliments, ils jouent aussi un rôle central dans le cycle du carbone. Ils régulent le climat et produisent la majeure partie de l’oxygène présent dans l’air que nous respirons. Ils jouent également un rôle socio-économique important. L’«économie bleue», constituée des secteurs traditionnels que sont la pêche, l’extraction ...

Les océans recouvrent plus des deux tiers de la surface du globe et sont un élément primordial de la vie sur notre planète. En plus de constituer l'une des sources principales d’aliments, ils jouent aussi un rôle central dans le cycle du carbone. Ils régulent le climat et produisent la majeure partie de l’oxygène présent dans l’air que nous respirons. Ils jouent également un rôle socio-économique important. L’«économie bleue», constituée des secteurs traditionnels que sont la pêche, l’extraction de pétrole et de gaz, le transport maritime, et le tourisme côtier, ainsi que de nouveaux secteurs à croissance rapide comme l’éolien offshore, l’énergie océanique, et les biotechnologies bleues, offre un potentiel énorme de croissance économique, de création d’emplois et d’innovation. Mais les océans sont actuellement soumis à de rudes pressions, notamment la surexploitation des ressources, la pollution, et les effets du changement climatique. La pollution des océans par le plastique a retenu l’attention du grand public ces dernières années, et les décideurs politiques en ont fait une de leurs priorités. Au niveau mondial, l’Union européenne participe activement à la protection des océans et contribue à donner forme à la gouvernance des océans. Elle a réalisé des progrès en prenant des mesures dans une série de domaines tels que la sûreté maritime, la pollution marine, l’économie bleue durable, le changement climatique, la protection des environnements marins, et la pêche durable. Elle a contribué à la réalisation de l’objectif du programme des Nations unies pour le développement durable à l’horizon 2030 relatif aux océans et participé aux négociations en vue d’un nouvel instrument international juridiquement contraignant sur la conservation et l’utilisation durable de la diversité biologique marine dans les zones ne relevant pas d’une juridiction nationale. Dans ses mesures de promotion de l’économie bleue, l’Union reconnaît aussi les responsabilités environnementales qui l’accompagnent. Des océans propres et en bonne santé garantissent la pérennité de ces activités économiques à long terme, alors qu’un déclin naturel menace l’écosystème de la planète dans son ensemble, et en fin de compte le bien-être de nos sociétés. La conservation des ressources biologiques marines dans le cadre de la politique commune de la pêche, les actions menées par l’Union au titre de la directive-cadre «stratégie pour le milieu marin», et la création d’aires marines protégées comptent parmi les principales politiques de l’Union en matière de protection de l’environnement marin. À cela s’ajoutent des mesures législatives récentes comme la directive sur les plastiques à usage unique visant à réduire la pollution du milieu marin. Le présent briefing met à jour une édition antérieure publiée pour la conférence de haut niveau sur les océans organisée par le Parlement européen le 19 mars 2019.

Snapshot of the EU regions with a view to selected Europe 2020 targets

03-10-2019

In 2014-2020, €461 billion from the EU budget is allocated to EU regions for investments in support of the strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth (Europe 2020). The NUTS 2 classification (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) divides EU territory into 281 regions with population thresholds between 800 000 and 3 000 000. It is used for the purpose of collection and harmonisation of statistics and for socio-economic analysis. Furthermore, it is used for allocating European ...

In 2014-2020, €461 billion from the EU budget is allocated to EU regions for investments in support of the strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth (Europe 2020). The NUTS 2 classification (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) divides EU territory into 281 regions with population thresholds between 800 000 and 3 000 000. It is used for the purpose of collection and harmonisation of statistics and for socio-economic analysis. Furthermore, it is used for allocating European structural and investment funds (ESIF) to EU regions. This paper provides statistics for the NUTS 2 regions with a focus on selected Europe 2020 targets, firstly looking at GDP and unemployment for the years 2007 and 2017/18. It shows the employment situation of the younger generation in 2018. It then considers employment, poverty and education in the light of selected Europe 2020 targets, and internet usage in view of the EU’s digital agenda. Finally, it shows the ESIF allocation for the 2014-2020 period and EU payments up to June 2019.

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26-10-2020
European Gender Equality Week - October 26-29, 2020
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EPRS online Book Talk | Beyond Christendom - The politics of religion in Europe today
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JURI: ICM Meeting on "Better Law Making from a digital perspective"
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