24

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

The new European cybersecurity competence centre and network

24-07-2020

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package containing a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as ...

On 13 September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package containing a series of initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. A year later, the Commission presented a proposal for the creation of a European cybersecurity competence centre with a related network of national coordination centres. The initiative aims to improve and strengthen the EU's cybersecurity capacity, by stimulating the European technological and industrial cybersecurity ecosystem as well as coordinating and pooling necessary resources in Europe. The competence centre is supposed to become the main body that would manage EU financial resources dedicated to cybersecurity research under the two proposed programmes – Digital Europe and Horizon Europe – within the next multiannual financial framework, for 2021-2027. Within the European Parliament, the file was assigned to the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The report was adopted on 19 February 2019 in the ITRE committee and voted by Parliament during the March I 2019 plenary. Although trilogue negotiations took place in March 2019, given the short timeframe until the end of the legislative term no agreement could be reached, and Parliament then adopted its first-reading position ahead of the May 2019 elections. A third trilogue meeting took place more than a year later, on 25 June 2020, and further negotiations are planned for September 2020. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

How digital technology is easing the burden of confinement

25-05-2020

The coronavirus pandemic is bringing an unforeseen acceleration in the digital transformation of societies around the world. This is the first pandemic in history in which digital technologies are being used on a massive scale to keep people connected while in isolation, allowing them to telework, follow online courses, shop online or consult health professionals from home. As a result, internet traffic has increased substantially since confinement began. According to EU Member States' national regulators ...

The coronavirus pandemic is bringing an unforeseen acceleration in the digital transformation of societies around the world. This is the first pandemic in history in which digital technologies are being used on a massive scale to keep people connected while in isolation, allowing them to telework, follow online courses, shop online or consult health professionals from home. As a result, internet traffic has increased substantially since confinement began. According to EU Member States' national regulators, operators have so far been able to manage this surge, while also introducing many exceptional measures, such as temporarily removing broadband data caps and making extra data and free online content available. The current crisis has highlighted the importance that upgraded telecoms networks and 5G will have for societies and economies. Furthermore, now that confinement has started to ease, it is increasingly clear that digital technology will continue to play a very important longer-term role in controlling the spread of the coronavirus. The scope of contact-tracing apps is likely to expand, and teleworking, telehealth and e-learning are likely to become more prevalent than before. However, the most popular digital apps, whether for e-commerce, social media, videoconferencing or contact tracing are not of EU origin, posing concerns for the EU's digital dependency, competitive advantage and data privacy. In fact, the coronavirus crisis has further consolidated the existing dominance of 'Big Tech'. The pandemic has further exacerbated existing issues; for instance, the digital divide has broadened further and there has been a global rise in cybersecurity incidents. The EU is poised to tackle these issues, while at the same time embracing the digital transformation in our lifestyles and allowing the internet to play a critical role in defeating the virus.

The rise of e-commerce and the cashless society

19-03-2020

Sales in the EU still predominantly take place offline – in bricks and mortar shops – and purchases are still predominantly made with cash. However, thanks to the level of convenience they offer, both online shopping and cashless electronic payments are booming and are among the key drivers of the digital transformation taking place in our economy and society. The real-time accessibility of e commerce products and their availability 24 hours a day, together with the ease of making electronic payments ...

Sales in the EU still predominantly take place offline – in bricks and mortar shops – and purchases are still predominantly made with cash. However, thanks to the level of convenience they offer, both online shopping and cashless electronic payments are booming and are among the key drivers of the digital transformation taking place in our economy and society. The real-time accessibility of e commerce products and their availability 24 hours a day, together with the ease of making electronic payments, are disrupting many aspects of traditional consumer shopping behaviour, which is also increasingly driven by widespread use of mobile devices and apps. Online sales hit a record high in 2019. At the international level, China is leading in both e-commerce transactions and mobile cashless payments. However, the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis has put countries across the world, starting with China, into extraordinary conditions, with citizens staying at home; and some sellers trying to extract the highest profit possible from the situation. In the EU, a large majority of internet users, particularly those under the age of 45, shop online. Clothes, sports goods, travel and online content such as games, videos and music are among the most popular items. This trend is also driven by the increase in cashless payments, which have become very popular in some countries. The numerous different cashless payment methods in existence are often highly localised. One such example, the e-wallet, is gaining particular importance, driven by the over 2 billion users it enjoyed in 2019. On the other hand, e-commerce and the cashless society are facing a host of challenges related to cybercrime, fraud, privacy, the digital divide and pollution, among others. The coronavirus outbreak is also posing various challenges to e-commerce supply chains, many of which are based in the hardest-hit countries. However, the opportunities that e-commerce and cashless transactions afford in terms of convenience, efficiency and affordability will help them gain further ground in the years to come; their popularity among younger generations and strong EU-level policy support for digital transformation are also helping boost their prospects.

Re-use of public sector information

29-07-2019

The mid-term review of the digital single market strategy in 2017 identified the data economy as one of the top three priority areas for action in the second half of the strategy's implementation, and announced a legislative proposal to improve access to and the re-use of publicly funded data. These data, which include geographical, land registry, statistical and legal information, are needed by re-users in the digital economy, and are increasingly employed by public administrations themselves. On ...

The mid-term review of the digital single market strategy in 2017 identified the data economy as one of the top three priority areas for action in the second half of the strategy's implementation, and announced a legislative proposal to improve access to and the re-use of publicly funded data. These data, which include geographical, land registry, statistical and legal information, are needed by re-users in the digital economy, and are increasingly employed by public administrations themselves. On 25 April 2018, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a revision of the directive on the re-use of public sector information, which was presented as part of a package of measures aiming to facilitate the creation of a common data space in the EU. The directive addresses a number of issues, and presents ways to boost the potential of public sector information, including the provision of real-time access to dynamic data, the supply of high-value public data for re-use, the prevention of new forms of exclusive arrangement, and action to limit the use of exceptions to the principle of charging the marginal cost. The European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) adopted its report on 3 December 2018. An agreement was reached with the Council in trilogue on 22 January 2019. The updated directive was adopted by the Parliament on 4 April and by the Council on 6 June 2019. It was signed by the Presidents of the European Parliament and of the Council on 20 June 2019, and published in the Official Journal of 26 June 2019. The directive came into force on 16 July 2019. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

ENISA and a new cybersecurity act

05-07-2019

In September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package with new initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. As part of these, the Commission tabled a legislative proposal to strengthen the EU Agency for Network Information Security (ENISA). Following the adoption of the Network Information Security Directive in 2016, ENISA is expected to play a broader role in the EU's cybersecurity landscape but is constrained by its current mandate and resources. The Commission ...

In September 2017, the Commission adopted a cybersecurity package with new initiatives to further improve EU cyber-resilience, deterrence and defence. As part of these, the Commission tabled a legislative proposal to strengthen the EU Agency for Network Information Security (ENISA). Following the adoption of the Network Information Security Directive in 2016, ENISA is expected to play a broader role in the EU's cybersecurity landscape but is constrained by its current mandate and resources. The Commission presented an ambitious reform proposal, including a permanent mandate for the agency, to ensure that ENISA can not only provide expert advice, as has been the case until now, but can also perform operational tasks. The proposal also envisaged the creation of the first voluntary EU cybersecurity certification framework for ICT products, where ENISA will also play an important role. Within the European Parliament, the Industry, Research and Energy Committee adopted its report on 10 July 2018. An agreement was reached with the Council during the fifth trilogue meeting, on 10 December 2018. The text was adopted by the European Parliament on 12 March and by the Council on 9 April 2019. The new regulation came into force on 27 June 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens: La transformation numérique

28-06-2019

Une révolution numérique est en cours, qui transforme le monde tel que nous le connaissons à une vitesse inouïe. Les technologies numériques ont changé non seulement la façon dont évoluent les entreprises, mais aussi celle dont les gens se connectent, échangent des informations et interagissent avec les secteurs public et privé. Les entreprises et citoyens européens ont besoin d’un cadre politique adéquat ainsi que de compétences et d’infrastructures appropriées pour tirer parti de l’énorme valeur ...

Une révolution numérique est en cours, qui transforme le monde tel que nous le connaissons à une vitesse inouïe. Les technologies numériques ont changé non seulement la façon dont évoluent les entreprises, mais aussi celle dont les gens se connectent, échangent des informations et interagissent avec les secteurs public et privé. Les entreprises et citoyens européens ont besoin d’un cadre politique adéquat ainsi que de compétences et d’infrastructures appropriées pour tirer parti de l’énorme valeur générée par l’économie numérique et assurer le succès de la transformation numérique. L’Union européenne joue un rôle prépondérant dans la définition de l’économie numérique, grâce à différentes initiatives politiques, qui vont de la promotion de l’investissement dans la réforme du droit de l’Union à des actions non législatives visant à améliorer la coordination et l’échange de bonnes pratiques des États membres. La législature 2014-2019 a vu se concrétiser un certain nombre d’initiatives dans les domaines de la numérisation de l’industrie et des services publics, des investissements dans les infrastructures et services numériques, dans les programmes de recherche, dans la cybersécurité, dans le commerce électronique, dans le droit d’auteur et dans la législation sur la protection des données. Les citoyens de l’Union sont de plus en plus conscients du rôle important que les technologies numériques jouent dans leur vie quotidienne. Selon un rapport de 2017, deux tiers des Européens affirment que ces technologies ont des conséquences positives sur la société, sur l’économie et sur leurs propres vies, mais qu’elles s’accompagnent néanmoins de nouveaux défis. La majorité des répondants estiment en effet que l’Union européenne, les autorités des États membres et les entreprises doivent prendre des mesures pour remédier aux conséquences de ces technologies. La récente proposition du programme «Europe numérique» (pour la période 2021-2027), premier programme de financement exclusivement consacré au soutien de la transformation numérique dans l’Union, montre que cette dernière entend renforcer son soutien à la transformation numérique dans les années à venir. De nouvelles mesures seront sans doute nécessaires, notamment en vue d’accroître les investissements dans les infrastructures, de stimuler l’innovation, d’encourager les champions du numérique et la numérisation des entreprises, de réduire les fractures numériques, de supprimer les obstacles restants au marché unique numérique et de garantir un cadre juridique et réglementaire adapté dans les domaines de l’informatique de pointe et des données, de l’intelligence artificielle et de la cybersécurité. Le Parlement européen, en tant que colégislateur, participe très étroitement à la conception du cadre politique qui aidera les citoyens et les entreprises à exploiter pleinement le potentiel des technologies numériques. Le présent document est une mise à jour d’un briefing plus ancien, publié avant les élections européennes de 2019.

L’ENISA et le nouveau règlement sur la cybersécurité

06-03-2019

La Commission européenne propose d’améliorer la résilience et la réaction de l’Union face aux cyberattaques, au moyen d’un mandat permanent et d’une importance accrue pour l’Agence européenne chargée de la sécurité des réseaux et de l’information (ENISA), l’agence de cybersécurité de l’Union. La proposition envisage aussi la création de la première certification en cybersécurité de l’Union pour les produits et les services informatiques, un domaine dans lequel l’ENISA jouera un rôle central. La commission ...

La Commission européenne propose d’améliorer la résilience et la réaction de l’Union face aux cyberattaques, au moyen d’un mandat permanent et d’une importance accrue pour l’Agence européenne chargée de la sécurité des réseaux et de l’information (ENISA), l’agence de cybersécurité de l’Union. La proposition envisage aussi la création de la première certification en cybersécurité de l’Union pour les produits et les services informatiques, un domaine dans lequel l’ENISA jouera un rôle central. La commission de l’industrie, de la recherche et de l’énergie (ITRE) du Parlement européen a adopté son rapport le 10 juillet 2018, tout comme le mandat en vue d’engager des négociations interinstitutionnelles. Le Conseil a adopté son mandat le 8 juin 2018. Au cours de la cinquième réunion de trilogue, le 10 décembre 2018, un accord a été conclu; il doit être voté par le Parlement au cours de la plénière de mars.

Free flow of non-personal data in the European Union

25-01-2019

One of the 16 key elements of the Commission’s digital single market strategy, presented in 2015, was a legislative proposal to facilitate the free flow of non-personal data. The mid-term review of the digital single market in 2017 identified the data economy as one of the top three priority areas in the second half of the strategy’s implementation. It found the European data economy could grow 18-fold, given favourable policy and legislative conditions, representing 4 % of EU GDP by 2020. On 13 ...

One of the 16 key elements of the Commission’s digital single market strategy, presented in 2015, was a legislative proposal to facilitate the free flow of non-personal data. The mid-term review of the digital single market in 2017 identified the data economy as one of the top three priority areas in the second half of the strategy’s implementation. It found the European data economy could grow 18-fold, given favourable policy and legislative conditions, representing 4 % of EU GDP by 2020. On 13 September 2017, the Commission tabled a proposal for a regulation aimed at removing obstacles to the free movement of non-personal data across borders. It focuses on removing the geographical restrictions on data storage in the internal market, a move long demanded by stakeholders. In addition, the Commission proposes self-regulation to facilitate switching cloud-service-providers for professional users. Other, less widely agreed aspects, such as access rights and liability were left for future proposals. The European Parliament adopted the legislation on 3 October 2018 and it was approved by the Council of Ministers on 9 November. The regulation was signed by both institutions on 14 November and published in the Official Journal on 28 November. It will be directly applicable in all Member States from 18 June 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

European high-performance computing joint undertaking

31-10-2018

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026, and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes as well as ...

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026, and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes as well as an equivalent contribution from the participating countries. The joint undertaking would be charged with the joint procurement of two pre-exascale supercomputers for the Union. It would also implement an HPC research and innovation programme to support the European HPC ecosystem in developing technologies to reach exascale performance by 2022-2023. The European Parliament, adopted its opinion during the July 2018 plenary session, and the Council adopted the text on 28 September 2018. The Council Regulation was published in the Official Journal of 8 October and entered into force on 28 October 2018. Third edition of a Briefing originally drafted by Vincent Reillon. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Libre circulation des données à caractère non personnel dans l’UE

26-09-2018

En 2017, la Commission européenne a adopté une proposition de règlement concernant un cadre pour la libre circulation des données à caractère non personnel dans l’Union européenne. Cette proposition était présentée comme une des actions clés dans l’examen à mi-parcours de la stratégie pour le marché unique numérique. Le Parlement européen devrait mettre aux voix le texte convenu lors des négociations en trilogue pendant sa période de session d’octobre I.

En 2017, la Commission européenne a adopté une proposition de règlement concernant un cadre pour la libre circulation des données à caractère non personnel dans l’Union européenne. Cette proposition était présentée comme une des actions clés dans l’examen à mi-parcours de la stratégie pour le marché unique numérique. Le Parlement européen devrait mettre aux voix le texte convenu lors des négociations en trilogue pendant sa période de session d’octobre I.

Partenaires