66

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Mot-clé
Date

Decarbonising maritime transport: The EU perspective

21-10-2020

International maritime transport is the backbone of the global economy. However, vessels release emissions that pollute the air and contribute significantly to global warming. As shipping is forecast to grow, reducing these emissions is urgent, in order not to undermine emissions-reducing efforts in other areas, to keep humans healthy, preserve the environment and limit climate change. Although international shipping was not explicitly mentioned in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, efforts to make ...

International maritime transport is the backbone of the global economy. However, vessels release emissions that pollute the air and contribute significantly to global warming. As shipping is forecast to grow, reducing these emissions is urgent, in order not to undermine emissions-reducing efforts in other areas, to keep humans healthy, preserve the environment and limit climate change. Although international shipping was not explicitly mentioned in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, efforts to make shipping cleaner and greener have since progressed. International rules to reduce air-polluting emissions from ships have been agreed in the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Their impact, in particular the application of stricter limits for sulphur content in marine fuels since 1 January 2020, is yet to be evaluated. Parallel efforts to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from maritime shipping have resulted in the setting of rules on collecting data on fuel oil consumption and the first collected data becoming available. In 2018, the IMO adopted an initial strategy for reducing GHG emissions, aimed at cutting shipping GHG emissions by at least 50 % by 2050, compared to 2008 levels. While concrete steps are yet to be agreed, achieving this goal will require both short-term emission-reducing measures and longer-term measures to make shipping switch to alternative fuels. Short-term guidance from the IMO is expected in 2020. On the EU front, the European Commission announced in the European Green Deal that GHG from EU transport should be cut by 90 % by 2050 and outlined how this would involve shipping. Initial measures are to be proposed by the end of 2020. This briefing reviews the existing international and EU rules on shipping emissions and their application, looks into the short-term measures under discussion and maps the landscape of marine fuels and technologies that could help decarbonise shipping in the long term.

Transport CO2 emissions in focus

07-10-2020

To limit global warming in line with the Paris Agreement, Europe aims to become the world’s first climate-neutral continent by 2050. To speed up this transition, the European Commission has proposed to raise the level of ambition, and reduce the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions by 55 % by 2030. On 7 October, in its position on the proposed European Climate Law, the European Parliament voted to raise the 2030 target to a 60 % reduction. This overview shows how transport activities resulted in about 29 ...

To limit global warming in line with the Paris Agreement, Europe aims to become the world’s first climate-neutral continent by 2050. To speed up this transition, the European Commission has proposed to raise the level of ambition, and reduce the EU’s greenhouse gas emissions by 55 % by 2030. On 7 October, in its position on the proposed European Climate Law, the European Parliament voted to raise the 2030 target to a 60 % reduction. This overview shows how transport activities resulted in about 29 % of total EU CO2 emissions in 2018. The map below gives the share of transport emissions (from fuel combustion, not including indirect emissions from electricity use) in the total CO2 emissions of each Member State, and the volume contribution of different transport modes to the EU total. While the volumes of total CO2 emissions have decreased in most Member States between 1990 and 2018, those resulting from transport show increases, in some cases more than twofold.

Connecting Europe Facility 2021-2027: Financing key EU infrastructure networks

17-06-2020

The EU supports the development of high-performing, sustainable and interconnected trans-European networks in the areas of transport, energy and digital infrastructure. It set up the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) as a dedicated financing instrument for the 2014-2020 period, to channel EU funding into the development of infrastructure networks, help eliminate market failures and attract further investment from the public and private sectors. Following a mid-term evaluation, the European Commission ...

The EU supports the development of high-performing, sustainable and interconnected trans-European networks in the areas of transport, energy and digital infrastructure. It set up the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) as a dedicated financing instrument for the 2014-2020 period, to channel EU funding into the development of infrastructure networks, help eliminate market failures and attract further investment from the public and private sectors. Following a mid-term evaluation, the European Commission proposed to renew the programme under the next long term EU budget. Negotiations between the Council and the European Parliament on the content of the proposal reached a partial provisional agreement, leaving aside the budget section and the questions relating to third countries. The agreement was approved by EU ambassadors and adopted by the Parliament at first reading on 17 April 2019. Discussions in the Council on the EU's 2021-2027 budget resumed when the Finnish Presidency of the Council published its ‘negotiating box’ in December 2019 and then with the proposal put forward in February 2020 by the President of the European Council, Charles Michel. However, Member States have not yet reached an agreement. In reaction to the coronavirus crisis and to the demand of the European Council, the Commission proposed an EU recovery fund and the adjusted Multiannual Financial Framework on 27 May 2020, also modifying the amounts to be allocated to the 2021-2027 CEF programme. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

EU shipping and ports facing coronavirus

11-05-2020

Maritime shipping moves around 75 % of the EU’s external trade and 30 % of intra-EU transport of goods. As part of the wider international maritime community, it supports complex supply chains moving food, energy and raw materials, manufactured goods and components as well as medical supplies. To keep functioning during the coronavirus outbreak, maritime shipping, ports and inland navigation face a new set of challenges that require EU support and a coordinated approach from the world’s governments ...

Maritime shipping moves around 75 % of the EU’s external trade and 30 % of intra-EU transport of goods. As part of the wider international maritime community, it supports complex supply chains moving food, energy and raw materials, manufactured goods and components as well as medical supplies. To keep functioning during the coronavirus outbreak, maritime shipping, ports and inland navigation face a new set of challenges that require EU support and a coordinated approach from the world’s governments.

Václav Havel: Advocate of an undivided Europe

08-05-2020

Despite a 'bourgeois' family background, which was a disqualification in communist-led Czechoslovakia, Václav Havel rapidly became an internationally acclaimed playwright. However, his unequivocally proclaimed ethical principles soon put him at odds with the communist regime, resulting in several prison sentences. Havel nevertheless held fast to his belief that moral integrity was a question of necessity, not choice, and attempted to live up to this ideal. The 1989 collapse of the regime made Havel ...

Despite a 'bourgeois' family background, which was a disqualification in communist-led Czechoslovakia, Václav Havel rapidly became an internationally acclaimed playwright. However, his unequivocally proclaimed ethical principles soon put him at odds with the communist regime, resulting in several prison sentences. Havel nevertheless held fast to his belief that moral integrity was a question of necessity, not choice, and attempted to live up to this ideal. The 1989 collapse of the regime made Havel a hero and, shortly after, an unlikely President. During his years in office, he managed to drive his country through the challenges of moving to a free market democracy, while maintaining his personal moral convictions and tirelessly advocating for larger issues of human rights, peace and democracy, underpinned by an active civil society. While Havel and his collaborators recast the foundations of today's Czech and Slovak democracies, his achievements in foreign policy have perhaps been even more important. Reminding Western countries of the dangers of a Europe that continued to be divided even after the removal of the Iron Curtain, Havel was instrumental in anchoring the new Czech Republic in western Europe, through its membership of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union (EU). He both recognised and emphasised the importance of closer European cooperation based on shared values, which for Havel constituted the core of relations among European countries. A firm advocate of the Euro-Atlantic alliance, he supported the United States of America, even on occasions when some other western European countries were reluctant to do so. With his political writings reaching far beyond the circumstances in which they were written, Havel is considered one of the most important intellectuals of the 20th century. He has received numerous honours and awards. One of the European Parliament's buildings in Strasbourg has borne Václav Havel's name since 2017.

Les politiques de l’Union - Au service des citoyens : Politique des transports

14-02-2020

Les transports font partie des secteurs stratégiques de l’économie européenne. Indispensables à la libre circulation, ils permettent le transport de personnes et de marchandises sur de longues distances, au-delà des frontières et des obstacles naturels, facilitant ainsi le quotidien des citoyens de l’Union. L’efficacité des systèmes de transport est la pierre angulaire de l’intégration européenne, car ces derniers assurent le flux de biens entre les producteurs et les constructeurs d’une part et ...

Les transports font partie des secteurs stratégiques de l’économie européenne. Indispensables à la libre circulation, ils permettent le transport de personnes et de marchandises sur de longues distances, au-delà des frontières et des obstacles naturels, facilitant ainsi le quotidien des citoyens de l’Union. L’efficacité des systèmes de transport est la pierre angulaire de l’intégration européenne, car ces derniers assurent le flux de biens entre les producteurs et les constructeurs d’une part et les consommateurs d’autre part. Pour le bon fonctionnement du marché unique dans toutes les régions, l’Union a besoin de réseaux de transports durables, efficaces et totalement interconnectés. Alors que la demande de services de transports augmente, l’un des principaux enjeux consiste désormais à réduire les émissions dues aux transports et de leurs effets néfastes sur la santé humaine et l’environnement. Les nouvelles technologies, telles que la numérisation et la mobilité connectée et automatisée, offrent de nouvelles possibilités d’améliorer la sûreté, la sécurité et l’efficacité des transports et de réduire les émissions, mais aussi de modifier les conditions de travail dans le secteur et les compétences requises pour y travailler. Le développement de l’économie collaborative (covoiturage et vélos en libre-service, par exemple) modifie le comportement des usagers et les schémas de mobilité. La politique des transports de l’Union devrait permettre au secteur des transports de réduire drastiquement ses émissions en utilisant de l’énergie plus propre en moindre quantité, en mettant en place des infrastructures plus modernes et en réduisant son incidence sur l’environnement. La nouvelle présidente de la Commission européenne, Ursula von der Leyen, veut passer rapidement à un transport numérique et sans carbone. Cette transformation fera partie des grandes priorités du pacte vert pour l’Europe et des objectifs visant à «adapter l’Europe à l’ère numérique». En 2020, la Commission proposera une «législation européenne sur le climat» dans laquelle l’Union s’engage à devenir climatiquement neutre d’ici à 2050. Le Conseil européen a approuvé cet objectif et le Parlement a déjà demandé à ce que des objectifs ambitieux et un budget correspondant soient fixés pour l’Union. Des mesures concrètes pour atteindre cet objectif ambitieux doivent encore être définies, mais la création de transports modernes, durables et décarbonés ne se fera pas sans changements radicaux.

L’économie bleue: Vue d’ensemble et cadre stratégique de l’Union européenne

30-01-2020

L’économie bleue englobe toutes les activités économiques relatives aux mers et aux océans. Elle emploie plus de 4 millions de personnes dans l’UE et son paysage évolue rapidement. Certains secteurs traditionnels sont en déclin tandis que d’autres, tant traditionnels qu’émergents, affichent un fort potentiel de croissance et d’innovation. Le présent document s’intéresse au cadre stratégique et aux différentes initiatives et actions de l’UE. Il donne une vue d’ensemble des «facilitateurs clés» transversaux ...

L’économie bleue englobe toutes les activités économiques relatives aux mers et aux océans. Elle emploie plus de 4 millions de personnes dans l’UE et son paysage évolue rapidement. Certains secteurs traditionnels sont en déclin tandis que d’autres, tant traditionnels qu’émergents, affichent un fort potentiel de croissance et d’innovation. Le présent document s’intéresse au cadre stratégique et aux différentes initiatives et actions de l’UE. Il donne une vue d’ensemble des «facilitateurs clés» transversaux ainsi qu’une analyse par secteur. Lorsqu’elle s’avère pertinente, la dimension internationale ou la position du Parlement européen est mise en évidence.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Adina-Ioana Vălean - Transport

11-11-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

European maritime single window: Harmonised digital reporting for ships

26-08-2019

Every time a ship calls at a port, its maritime transport operator has to submit a set of pre-arrival information to a range of entities and agencies. Currently, the reporting process is not harmonised across EU ports. In addition, the information provided by ships is not efficiently shared among the actors concerned. The resulting multiple reporting places an excessive administrative burden on shipping operators, with negative impacts rippling down the logistics chain. Within broader efforts to ...

Every time a ship calls at a port, its maritime transport operator has to submit a set of pre-arrival information to a range of entities and agencies. Currently, the reporting process is not harmonised across EU ports. In addition, the information provided by ships is not efficiently shared among the actors concerned. The resulting multiple reporting places an excessive administrative burden on shipping operators, with negative impacts rippling down the logistics chain. Within broader efforts to modernise EU transport, the European Commission is proposing to bring all the reporting linked to a port call together into one digital space – the 'European Maritime Single Window', to harmonise reporting procedures for shipping operators and to ensure data can be shared and reused efficiently. Interinstitutional negotiations concluded on 7 February, the agreed text was adopted by the Parliament in plenary on 18 April and by Council on 13 June 2019. After publication in the Official Journal, the new regulation entered into force on 14 August 2019, while the measures within it will apply from 15 August 2025. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Port reception facilities for ship waste: Collecting waste from ships in ports

07-06-2019

Marine litter and pollution put the marine environment at risk. While a great proportion of marine litter originates from land-based sources, limiting waste discharges from ships also plays an essential role in efforts to preserve marine and coastal ecosystems. Based on international law, EU legislation requires vessels to bring the waste they generate on voyages to waste-reception facilities in port, and obliges EU ports to provide such facilities to ships using the port. Despite these developments ...

Marine litter and pollution put the marine environment at risk. While a great proportion of marine litter originates from land-based sources, limiting waste discharges from ships also plays an essential role in efforts to preserve marine and coastal ecosystems. Based on international law, EU legislation requires vessels to bring the waste they generate on voyages to waste-reception facilities in port, and obliges EU ports to provide such facilities to ships using the port. Despite these developments, discharges at sea continue. In January 2018, the European Commission put forward a new legislative proposal seeking to improve the collection of ship waste while ensuring efficient maritime transport operations in ports. Interinstitutional negotiations concluded on 13 December 2018. The final text was adopted by the Parliament on 13 March 2019 and then by the Council on 29 March. The Directive was then signed on 17 April by the presidents of the two institutions and will be published in the Official Journal shortly.

Evénements à venir

26-10-2020
European Gender Equality Week - October 26-29, 2020
Autre événement -
FEMM
26-10-2020
Joint LIBE - FEMM Hearing on Trafficking in human beings
Audition -
LIBE FEMM
26-10-2020
Joint LIBE - FEMM Hearing on Trafficking in human beings
Audition -
FEMM

Partenaires