47

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

European Day of Languages: Digital survival of lesser-used languages

23-09-2020

Since 2001, Europe has marked European Day of Languages each year on 26 September, in order to focus attention on its rich linguistic diversity. The European Union boasts 24 official languages, and around 60 regional and minority languages are spoken across the Member States. Europe's linguistic mosaic also includes a variety of sign languages spoken by half a million people, heritage languages such as ancient Greek and Latin, as well as Esperanto – a planned international language created in Europe ...

Since 2001, Europe has marked European Day of Languages each year on 26 September, in order to focus attention on its rich linguistic diversity. The European Union boasts 24 official languages, and around 60 regional and minority languages are spoken across the Member States. Europe's linguistic mosaic also includes a variety of sign languages spoken by half a million people, heritage languages such as ancient Greek and Latin, as well as Esperanto – a planned international language created in Europe. According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco), many world languages, including European ones, are endangered and could disappear due to the dominant role of languages such as English with a huge population of native speakers and other learners. Regional and minority languages (RMLs) together with smaller state languages – the 'lesser-used languages' – are under serious threat of extinction. This threat is exacerbated by digital technology. The future of RMLs depends to some extent on their presence in new digital media. Young people communicate and seek information mainly via the internet. If online content is only available in dominant languages, lesser-used languages could become 'digitally extinct'. However, digital technology is not necessarily a death sentence; it can also offer a rescue kit. Online education, online language learning and language technologies can help revitalise endangered languages. To achieve this objective, huge efforts are needed by speakers' communities and language technology specialists to gather data, analyse and process it, in order to create language tools. With such tools, young people can create content in lesser-used languages and expand their use.

European Heritage Days – Women's contribution

15-09-2020

European Heritage Days have helped raise awareness of Europe's rich and diverse heritage. Yet, have they promoted women's contribution to our common heritage sufficiently or highlighted enough the female dimension of the aim to promote diversity?

European Heritage Days have helped raise awareness of Europe's rich and diverse heritage. Yet, have they promoted women's contribution to our common heritage sufficiently or highlighted enough the female dimension of the aim to promote diversity?

Creative Europe programme 2021-2027

24-08-2020

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The existing programme focuses ...

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The existing programme focuses on the economic dimension of the cultural sector and its contribution to job creation and economic growth. Some stakeholders have voiced concern at taking such a strongly economic approach to culture. Under the proposed programme, the economic dimension is one axis alongside the social dimension, and culture's contribution to international relations. The proposed framework for cultural policy therefore highlights not only the economic dimension of the cultural and creative sectors, but also the role of culture in social cohesion and its relation to creative and artistic freedom and diversity, and freedom and plurality of media. Both Parliament and Council have agreed positions on the proposal, and trilogue negotiations started in autumn 2019 with a view to finding agreement before Council’s first reading. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Cultural tourism out of confinement

10-07-2020

The lockdowns, border closures and other restrictive measures in response to the coronavirus pandemic brought tourist and cultural activities to a halt in most EU Member States between mid-March and mid-June, significantly affecting businesses and consumers. A progressive easing of these restrictive measures is now under way.

The lockdowns, border closures and other restrictive measures in response to the coronavirus pandemic brought tourist and cultural activities to a halt in most EU Member States between mid-March and mid-June, significantly affecting businesses and consumers. A progressive easing of these restrictive measures is now under way.

Performing arts: Emerging from confinement

29-06-2020

In the EU as elsewhere in the world, the performing arts were among the first sectors to be hit by measures to slow the spread of the coronavirus, and are now among the last to reopen. As the confinement measures are relaxed, the focus now is on supporting the performing arts and finding a way to re-engage with live audiences.

In the EU as elsewhere in the world, the performing arts were among the first sectors to be hit by measures to slow the spread of the coronavirus, and are now among the last to reopen. As the confinement measures are relaxed, the focus now is on supporting the performing arts and finding a way to re-engage with live audiences.

Digital culture − Access issues

04-06-2020

The digital shift has touched all aspects of human activity, and culture is no exception. Cultural assets and works have been digitised and digital technology has become a tool for novel creations. Digital-born works have enriched the resources available to those interested in culture. Technology has huge potential to facilitate and democratise access to cultural resources. However, certain technical conditions are required to allow access to these cultural resources, for example webpages devoted ...

The digital shift has touched all aspects of human activity, and culture is no exception. Cultural assets and works have been digitised and digital technology has become a tool for novel creations. Digital-born works have enriched the resources available to those interested in culture. Technology has huge potential to facilitate and democratise access to cultural resources. However, certain technical conditions are required to allow access to these cultural resources, for example webpages devoted to digitised cultural heritage and its hidden treasures as well as those devoted to novel creations. These conditions include an internet infrastructure, computers, tablets, or, more frequently, a smartphone − all of which has a price tag. Moreover, the deployment of such infrastructure needs to be evenly distributed so as to provide equal and democratic access to cultural resources − which is not yet the case. Access to costly technology is not sufficient. The technology used must go hand in hand with digital skills that are not evenly acquired by all ages and social groups. Persons with disabilities are in a particularly difficult situation, since ICT equipment often does not suit their specific needs. Moreover, cultural resources are often not available in suitable formats for them. European Union policies and strategies in many areas take all these challenges and access barriers into consideration. EU funds finance connectivity infrastructure in areas in need, training, and educational initiatives across policy areas going from culture and education to innovation and technology. The relationship between technology, science, the arts, and culture is becoming increasingly close in the digital era.

EU support for artists and the cultural and creative sector during the coronavirus crisis

05-05-2020

The EU's cultural and creative sectors (CCS) are a European Union economic and societal asset, providing an important contribution to GDP, and shaping identity and diversity. Despite the significant contribution of the CCS to the economy and people's wellbeing, the situation of operators and workers in the sector is often precarious and their work seasonal. The outbreak of the Covid 19 pandemic particularly threatens the future of artists, creators and cultural operators, who are severely impacted ...

The EU's cultural and creative sectors (CCS) are a European Union economic and societal asset, providing an important contribution to GDP, and shaping identity and diversity. Despite the significant contribution of the CCS to the economy and people's wellbeing, the situation of operators and workers in the sector is often precarious and their work seasonal. The outbreak of the Covid 19 pandemic particularly threatens the future of artists, creators and cultural operators, who are severely impacted by the enforcement of social distancing measures and the consequent postponements, cancellations or closures of events, live performances, exhibitions, museums and cultural institutions. EU Member States reacted quickly to counterbalance the consequences of Covid-19 containment measures with support for cultural institutions and artists. At the EU level, measures have been introduced to protect the small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), which predominate in CCS; the self-employed, who are very numerous among artists and in CCS; as well as those who have lost their jobs, a constant threat for those working in CCS. Sector specific measures have also been discussed to protect the most vulnerable, including performing artists. A series of surveys and mappings of different sectors are planned to help design a path towards the sector's recovery from the confinement measures and the resulting change in audience behaviour. The European Parliament, and its Committee on Culture and Education, call for sector-specific support measures and funds to be earmarked for those who have supported confined populations and health service professionals in particular, with their artistic output.

Roma and Sinti Holocaust

23-01-2020

On 27 January 1945, the Red Army liberated the Auschwitz concentration and extermination camp. Held on this date since 2002, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day is a solemn occasion to commemorate the Jewish, Roma and Sinti victims of Nazi terror. The Roma and Sinti Holocaust is still largely unknown to the public.

On 27 January 1945, the Red Army liberated the Auschwitz concentration and extermination camp. Held on this date since 2002, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day is a solemn occasion to commemorate the Jewish, Roma and Sinti victims of Nazi terror. The Roma and Sinti Holocaust is still largely unknown to the public.

Les communautés juives dans l’Union européenne

23-01-2020

La population juive d’Europe a diminué au cours des dernières décennies, et de plus en plus d’actes antisémites et de violences à l’encontre de personnes juives ont eu lieu dans l’Union ces dernières années. Pour défendre ses valeurs, notamment le respect des minorités, l’Union européenne entreprend et finance des actions destinées à lutter contre l’antisémitisme. La présente note « en bref » constitue une version mise à jour de celle de janvier 2018

La population juive d’Europe a diminué au cours des dernières décennies, et de plus en plus d’actes antisémites et de violences à l’encontre de personnes juives ont eu lieu dans l’Union ces dernières années. Pour défendre ses valeurs, notamment le respect des minorités, l’Union européenne entreprend et finance des actions destinées à lutter contre l’antisémitisme. La présente note « en bref » constitue une version mise à jour de celle de janvier 2018

L’Union européenne et la mémoire de l’Holocauste

23-01-2020

Le terme Holocauste désigne l’assassinat de six millions de Juifs européens, ainsi que de Roms et de membres d’autres groupes sociaux destinés condamnés à l’anéantissement par le régime nazi et ses collaborateurs. Le régime nazi mit en place dès 1933 une politique de spoliation, de discrimination d’État et de persécution des Juifs, puis de pogroms et de déportation de masse vers des camps de concentration. Cette politique fut ensuite étendue à tous les territoires et États qu’il dominait en Europe ...

Le terme Holocauste désigne l’assassinat de six millions de Juifs européens, ainsi que de Roms et de membres d’autres groupes sociaux destinés condamnés à l’anéantissement par le régime nazi et ses collaborateurs. Le régime nazi mit en place dès 1933 une politique de spoliation, de discrimination d’État et de persécution des Juifs, puis de pogroms et de déportation de masse vers des camps de concentration. Cette politique fut ensuite étendue à tous les territoires et États qu’il dominait en Europe pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Les exécutions sommaires de masse («Shoah par balles») et les camps d’extermination en furent l’aboutissement. Les bourreaux furent jugés lors du procès de Nuremberg en 1945-1946, mais le tribunal préféra les inculper pour crimes contre l’humanité plutôt que pour génocide. Ce n’est qu’en 2005, à l’occasion du 60e anniversaire de la libération d’Auschwitz, qu’une résolution de l’Organisation des Nations Unies désigna le 27 janvier comme journée internationale de commémoration de l’Holocauste, aussi appelée «Journée internationale dédiée à la mémoire des victimes de l’Holocauste». Dans l’Union européenne, de nombreux programmes sont destinés à perpétuer la mémoire de ces tragédies ayant marqué l’histoire du continent. Le Parlement européen, dès 1995, adopta des résolutions rappelant le devoir de mémoire non seulement par des commémorations, mais aussi grâce à l’éducation. En novembre 2018, l’Union européenne devint un partenaire international permanent de l’Alliance internationale pour la mémoire de l’Holocauste (AIMH). La présente note d’information constitue une version mise à jour de celle de janvier 2018.

Evénements à venir

28-10-2020
Climate Change and Health
Atelier -
ENVI
28-10-2020
Public Hearing "Women and digitalisation"
Audition -
FEMM AIDA
28-10-2020
Worskhop on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
Atelier -
PETI

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