9

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

Is transparency the key to citizens’ trust?

11-04-2019

Trust in political institutions is a key element of representative democracies. Trust in the rule of law is also the basis for democratic participation of citizens. According to the spring 2018 Eurobarometer survey of public awareness of the EU institutions, 50 % of respondents indicated they trust the European Parliament, which represents a 34 % increase since the beginning of the 2014-2019 legislative term. A transparent political decision-making processes has become a common objective to help ...

Trust in political institutions is a key element of representative democracies. Trust in the rule of law is also the basis for democratic participation of citizens. According to the spring 2018 Eurobarometer survey of public awareness of the EU institutions, 50 % of respondents indicated they trust the European Parliament, which represents a 34 % increase since the beginning of the 2014-2019 legislative term. A transparent political decision-making processes has become a common objective to help strengthen citizens’ trust in policy-makers and enhance the accountability of public administrations. In this regard, regulation of lobbying (the exchange between policy makers and stakeholders), and bolstering the integrity of this process, is often considered a vital ingredient. Public expectations for increased transparency of the exchange between policy-makers and interest representatives varies from one political system to the next, but it has increasingly become a topic of debate for parliaments across Europe, and a regular demand during election campaigns.

La nouvelle loi française sur la représentation d’intérêts

04-07-2018

Depuis le 1er mai 2018, la nouvelle loi française sur la représentation d’intérêts est pleinement appliquée. Partie intégrante de la loi du 9 décembre 2016 relative à la transparence, à la lutte contre la corruption et à la modernisation de la vie économique (dite «loi Sapin II»), le train de mesures sur la représentation d’intérêts a établi un cadre réglementaire pour les activités de représentation d’intérêts ainsi qu’un registre national obligatoire (le «répertoire») pour les représentants d’intérêts ...

Depuis le 1er mai 2018, la nouvelle loi française sur la représentation d’intérêts est pleinement appliquée. Partie intégrante de la loi du 9 décembre 2016 relative à la transparence, à la lutte contre la corruption et à la modernisation de la vie économique (dite «loi Sapin II»), le train de mesures sur la représentation d’intérêts a établi un cadre réglementaire pour les activités de représentation d’intérêts ainsi qu’un registre national obligatoire (le «répertoire») pour les représentants d’intérêts. Dans le cadre d’un processus d’application graduelle, le répertoire auquel tous les représentants d’intérêts actifs doivent s’inscrire a tout d’abord été créé le 1er juillet 2017. Après s’être inscrits, avant le 1er janvier 2018, les représentants devaient déclarer leurs activités de représentation d’intérêts dans ce répertoire avant le 30 avril 2018. Le répertoire, qui compte un peu plus de 1 600 inscrits à l’heure actuelle, est tenu par la Haute autorité pour la transparence de la vie publique (HATVP). En France, l’acceptation culturelle de la représentation d’intérêts en tant que profession a été lente et, en ce sens, la nouvelle loi permettra de rendre publiques les activités de représentation d’intérêts et de les réglementer, en s’inspirant de l’exemple irlandais. La loi Sapin II vise une amélioration générale de la responsabilité publique et de la transparence des processus de prise de décision. Certaines mesures en ce sens avaient déjà été prises par le passé, principalement la création, en janvier 2014, de la HATVP, organe indépendant chargé de veiller à l’intégrité et à la transparence des institutions publiques nationales.

Revolving doors in the EU and US

04-07-2018

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US ...

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US public remains unconvinced. Scepticism may be fuelled by new exceptions made to the rules – retroactive ethics pledge waivers – and the refusal of the White House to disclose the numbers or beneficiaries of said waivers. Watchdog organisations argue that not only has the Trump administration so far failed to 'drain the swamp', it has ended up doing quite the opposite. In the EU, where revolving door cases are increasingly being covered in the media, both the European Parliament and Commission have adopted Codes of Conduct, regulating the activities of current and former Members, Commissioners, and even staff. The European Ombudsman, Emily O'Reilly, has on numerous occasions spoken out in favour of further measures, such as 'cooling-off periods', and has carried out several inquiries into potentially problematic revolving door cases. Following calls from Parliament, the Juncker Commission adopted a new and stronger Code of Conduct for Commissioners early in 2018. Even so, no one single Code can hope to bring an end to the debate.

Regulating lobbying in Canada

03-05-2017

The recent populist backlash against traditional political systems in many countries has put the issue of ethics at the forefront of government attempts to demonstrate that public policy is carried out without undue influence or interference from vested interests. As one of the first four countries in the world to regulate parliamentary lobbying activities, Canada provides an interesting example of legislation aimed at boosting transparency, honesty and integrity in public decision-making. Evolving ...

The recent populist backlash against traditional political systems in many countries has put the issue of ethics at the forefront of government attempts to demonstrate that public policy is carried out without undue influence or interference from vested interests. As one of the first four countries in the world to regulate parliamentary lobbying activities, Canada provides an interesting example of legislation aimed at boosting transparency, honesty and integrity in public decision-making. Evolving from the 1989 Lobbyists Registration Act, today’s Lobbying Act lays out the types of activities concerned and the processes of lobbying regulation, including sanctions, leading to a new wave of investigations and rulings. While a decision on the European Commission’s proposal for an obligatory transparency register is awaited, registration with the Registry of Lobbyists in Canada is already mandatory for any individual who is paid to carry out lobbying activities, on their own or on behalf of others. Lobbying activities are considered to include all oral and arranged communications with a public office about legislative proposals, bills, resolutions or grants. Consultant lobbyists must also declare meetings held with public office-holders, and communications they make regarding contracts for grants, on a monthly basis. Reporting takes the form of regular monthly ‘returns’, lodged with the Commissioner of Lobbying. In cases of conviction for a breach of the rules, sanctions can include fines and imprisonment. The lobbyists’ code of conduct, established in consultation with the lobbying community, is enforced by the Commissioner of Lobbying and provides guidance on access to public office-holders, conflicts of interest, and gifts. However, there are no fines or imprisonment for breaches of this code.

Lobbying regulation framework in Poland

12-12-2016

Poland became one of the first countries in Europe to regulate lobbying activities with the introduction of its Lobbying Act, which entered into force on 7 March 2006. It aims to increase the transparency of lobbying in three ways: 1) an obligation for the government and ministries to publish their legislative agendas; 2) the creation of a lobby register; 3) requiring all public authorities participating in the law-making process to declare their lobby contacts. The Lobbying Act introduced the concept ...

Poland became one of the first countries in Europe to regulate lobbying activities with the introduction of its Lobbying Act, which entered into force on 7 March 2006. It aims to increase the transparency of lobbying in three ways: 1) an obligation for the government and ministries to publish their legislative agendas; 2) the creation of a lobby register; 3) requiring all public authorities participating in the law-making process to declare their lobby contacts. The Lobbying Act introduced the concept of 'professional lobbying', defined as a paid action performed on behalf of third parties aimed at influencing a public authority in the legislative process. It also set up a register for those who carry out such activities. There is a fee required upon registration, and in the event of lobbying by an unregistered entity, the minister responsible for administrative affairs can issue a fine. Apart from the lobby register set up under the Lobbying Act, the two parliamentary chambers keep their own registers of lobbyists accessing their premises. However, as these three registers lack any relevant information on where and how lobbyists seek to gain influence, and have gathered only around 400 entries over 10 years, they have been criticised for not providing reliable information on the lobbying landscape in Poland.

Transparency of lobbying: The example of the Irish Lobby Register

26-07-2016

On 11 March 2015, Ireland’s Regulation of Lobbying Act 2015 was signed into law by President Michael D. Higgins. The Act provides for, inter alia, the establishment of a mandatory register of lobbyists and lays out its rules. The Irish Lobby Register was only the sixth fully mandatory lobby register among the EU Member States, and attracted widespread attention due to its comprehensive scope. The drive to develop the legislation was strengthened by a number of public scandals in the country. The ...

On 11 March 2015, Ireland’s Regulation of Lobbying Act 2015 was signed into law by President Michael D. Higgins. The Act provides for, inter alia, the establishment of a mandatory register of lobbyists and lays out its rules. The Irish Lobby Register was only the sixth fully mandatory lobby register among the EU Member States, and attracted widespread attention due to its comprehensive scope. The drive to develop the legislation was strengthened by a number of public scandals in the country. The Irish Lobby Register presents an example which other Member States could follow, and might also be a source of inspiration for an EU system in transition. Its mandatory nature allows for a stricter approach, with investigations and sanctions available for non-compliance. Strict definitions enumerate those who fall under its scope, unlike the EU’s all-encompassing activity-based definition of interest representation. While financial information is not requested of registrants under the Irish system, returns are required three times a year and provide greater detail on all instances of lobbying activity carried out. Its scope is both broad and ambitious. As with any new legislation, the effectiveness of the new Irish system can only be measured in practice. The register has met with a positive start, registering a high uptake. A critical period is approaching, with the legislation to be reviewed in September 2016, one year after its commencement. The powers of investigation and sanctions under the Act will also come into force simultaneously.

Public consultation on the Transparency Register: Towards a mandatory Transparency Register for lobbyists

26-04-2016

Will the EU soon have a mandatory transparency register for lobbyists? After a long-standing call from the European Parliament, the European Commission launched a public consultation seeking input from stakeholders on the functioning of the current Transparency Register, which is run jointly by the Parliament and the Commission, and on a move towards a mandatory regime.

Will the EU soon have a mandatory transparency register for lobbyists? After a long-standing call from the European Parliament, the European Commission launched a public consultation seeking input from stakeholders on the functioning of the current Transparency Register, which is run jointly by the Parliament and the Commission, and on a move towards a mandatory regime.

Registre de transparence de l'Union

26-04-2016

Les nombreuses activités de lobbying auprès des institutions de l'Union suscitent des critiques au regard de la transparence et de la responsabilité dans le cadre du processus décisionnel de l'Union. Pour répondre à ces préoccupations, le Parlement a créé en 1995 un registre des lobbyistes, avant que la Commission ne lui emboîte le pas en 2008. Les deux institutions ont, en 2011, fusionné ces deux instruments en un registre européen de transparence sur la base d'un accord interinstitutionnel. Jusqu'à ...

Les nombreuses activités de lobbying auprès des institutions de l'Union suscitent des critiques au regard de la transparence et de la responsabilité dans le cadre du processus décisionnel de l'Union. Pour répondre à ces préoccupations, le Parlement a créé en 1995 un registre des lobbyistes, avant que la Commission ne lui emboîte le pas en 2008. Les deux institutions ont, en 2011, fusionné ces deux instruments en un registre européen de transparence sur la base d'un accord interinstitutionnel. Jusqu'à présent, le Conseil demeure observateur du système. Le registre de transparence est un système volontaire d'enregistrement de toute entité qui cherche à influer directement ou indirectement sur le processus décisionnel des institutions de l'Union. Jusqu'ici, le nombre des entités enregistrées a progressé à un rythme d'environ 1 000 organisations par an, pour atteindre aujourd'hui plus de 9 500 organisations. Bien qu'il soit très difficile d'estimer l'étendue réelle du registre, celui-ci engloberait, selon une étude universitaire réalisée en 2013, 60 % à 75 % des représentants d'intérêts actifs au niveau de l'Union. Conformément à l'accord interinstitutionnel, un réexamen politique du registre de transparence a eu lieu en 2013-2014. Il a débouché sur la mise en place d'un nouveau système d'enregistrement amélioré en janvier 2015. Depuis 2008, le Parlement appelle de ses vœux un registre obligatoire pour les lobbyistes actifs auprès des institutions de l'Union, arguant qu'un tel registre permettrait d'instaurer des normes plus strictes et davantage de transparence en matière de lobbying. Cette question n'a cessé de gagner en importance, notamment après que le président de la Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, l'a mise à l'ordre du jour et s'est engagé à proposer un système obligatoire d'ici la fin de 2016, conformément à la demande du Parlement. En outre, depuis le 1er décembre 2014, la Commission publie les informations relatives aux relations qu'entretiennent les Commissaires, les membres de leurs cabinets et les directeurs généraux avec des lobbyistes. Elle réalise actuellement une consultation publique sur la proposition relative à un registre obligatoire. Les lois qui régissent le lobbying dans les États membres varient. Seuls quelques pays disposent d'un système d'enregistrement obligatoire, le dernier en date étant l'Irlande. La présente publication est une mise à jour d'un briefing publié en décembre 2014.

Registre de transparence de l'UE

02-12-2014

Les nombreuses activités de lobbying auprès des institutions de l'UE suscitent des critiques au regard de la transparence et de la responsabilité dans le cadre du processus décisionnel de l'UE. Pour répondre à ces préoccupations, le Parlement a créé en 1995 un registre des lobbyistes, suivi en 2008 par la Commission. Les deux institutions ont, en 2011, fusionné ces deux instruments en un registre européen de Transparence (TR), sur la base d'un accord interinstitutionnel (IIA). Jusqu'à présent, le ...

Les nombreuses activités de lobbying auprès des institutions de l'UE suscitent des critiques au regard de la transparence et de la responsabilité dans le cadre du processus décisionnel de l'UE. Pour répondre à ces préoccupations, le Parlement a créé en 1995 un registre des lobbyistes, suivi en 2008 par la Commission. Les deux institutions ont, en 2011, fusionné ces deux instruments en un registre européen de Transparence (TR), sur la base d'un accord interinstitutionnel (IIA). Jusqu'à présent, le Conseil demeure observateur du système. Le TR est un système d'enregistrement volontaire pour toute entité qui cherche à influer directement ou indirectement le processus décisionnel des institutions de l'Union. Il a jusqu'à maintenant augmenté à un taux moyen de 1 000 organisations par an, atteignant aujourd'hui plus de 7 000 organisations. Même s'il est très difficile de faire des estimations sur la couverture réelle du registre, une étude académique récente (2013) a estimé que le registre couvrait 60 à 75% des organisations de lobbying actives au niveau européen. Conformément à l'IIA, un réexamen politique du registre de transparence a eu lieu en 2013-14 à la suite duquel un nouveau système d'enregistrement amélioré sera introduit en janvier 2015. Depuis 2008 le Parlement appelle de ses vœux un registre obligatoire pour les lobbyistes actifs auprès des institutions de l'UE, mettant en avant que seul un registre obligatoire permettrait d'assurer le respect total par les lobbyistes de leur code de conduite. Jean-Claude Juncker, l'ayant mis à son ordre du jour, le sujet est de plus en plus d'actualité ; le Président de la Commission s'est ainsi engagé à ce que la Commission présente une proposition pour un système obligatoire d'ici 2016, tel que demandé par le Parlement. En outre, depuis le 1er décembre 2014, la Commission publie les informations relatives aux contacts des Commissaires, des membres de leurs cabinets et des Directeurs-Généraux avec des lobbyistes. Les législations des États Membres varient en ce qui concerne la règlementation du lobbying ; des systèmes d'enregistrement obligatoires existent seulement en Lituanie, Pologne, Slovénie, Autriche et au Royaume-Uni. Le Parlement irlandais travaille actuellement sur une loi instaurant un tel régime. Des systèmes d'enregistrement volontaires existent en Allemagne, en France et aux Pays-Bas.

Evénements à venir

09-11-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | The revolutions of 1989-90 thirty years on [...]
Autre événement -
EPRS
09-11-2020
Sexual harassment in the EU institutions - Public Hearing
Audition -
FEMM
10-11-2020
The Annual Rule of Law Report by the Commission and the Role of National Parliaments
Autre événement -
LIBE

Partenaires