6

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

Follow up to the 2009 and 2014 Studies on the Code of Conduct for Commissioners - Improving Effectiveness and Efficiency

15-07-2019

The European Parliament is very attentive to the issue of transparency and integrity within the EU institutions. In the past, the EP has commissioned two studies to verify the level of effectiveness and efficiency of the Code of Conduct for Commissioners of the European Commission. This in-depth analysis verifies whether the Code of Conduct of 2018 complies with the requests the EP has made in order to guarantee the best performance in terms of transparency and integrity by the EC Commissioners. ...

The European Parliament is very attentive to the issue of transparency and integrity within the EU institutions. In the past, the EP has commissioned two studies to verify the level of effectiveness and efficiency of the Code of Conduct for Commissioners of the European Commission. This in-depth analysis verifies whether the Code of Conduct of 2018 complies with the requests the EP has made in order to guarantee the best performance in terms of transparency and integrity by the EC Commissioners. Most of the EP requests have been satisfied. However, there is still some room for improvement in terms of transparency of the Independent Ethical Committee, the cooling off period for Commissioners and provisions related to the role of the European Ombudsman within the Code. Moreover, the Code of Conduct, being a soft law instrument, could be upgraded to a hard law instrument having a stronger binding force. Finally, the EP could reiterate the study recommendations concerning stricter provisions on the involvement of Commissioners in the national, regional or local politics.

Transparency, integrity and accountability in the EU institutions

26-03-2019

This briefing provides an overview of the main tools on transparency, integrity and accountability implemented in the EU institutions and the reforms thereof.

This briefing provides an overview of the main tools on transparency, integrity and accountability implemented in the EU institutions and the reforms thereof.

Revolving doors in the EU and US

04-07-2018

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US ...

The flow of officials and politicians between the public and private sector has in the past few years given rise to calls for more transparency and accountability. In order to mitigate the reputational damage to public institutions by problematic use of the 'revolving door', this phenomenon is increasingly being regulated at national level. In the United States, President Trump recently changed the rules put in place by his predecessor to slow the revolving door. As shown by press coverage, the US public remains unconvinced. Scepticism may be fuelled by new exceptions made to the rules – retroactive ethics pledge waivers – and the refusal of the White House to disclose the numbers or beneficiaries of said waivers. Watchdog organisations argue that not only has the Trump administration so far failed to 'drain the swamp', it has ended up doing quite the opposite. In the EU, where revolving door cases are increasingly being covered in the media, both the European Parliament and Commission have adopted Codes of Conduct, regulating the activities of current and former Members, Commissioners, and even staff. The European Ombudsman, Emily O'Reilly, has on numerous occasions spoken out in favour of further measures, such as 'cooling-off periods', and has carried out several inquiries into potentially problematic revolving door cases. Following calls from Parliament, the Juncker Commission adopted a new and stronger Code of Conduct for Commissioners early in 2018. Even so, no one single Code can hope to bring an end to the debate.

Policy Departments' Monthly Highlights - February 2018

05-02-2018

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The impact of Brexit on the legal status of European Union officials and other servants of British nationality

20-12-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, focuses on the legal status of EU active and retired officials and other servants of British nationality in the context of the UK leaving the EU under Article 50 TEU. It examines the legal position of EU officials and other servants of British nationality with their rights and possible remedies. It further explores avenues towards solutions ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, focuses on the legal status of EU active and retired officials and other servants of British nationality in the context of the UK leaving the EU under Article 50 TEU. It examines the legal position of EU officials and other servants of British nationality with their rights and possible remedies. It further explores avenues towards solutions for open legal questions.

Auteur externe

Herwig C.H. HOFMANN, Professor, University of Luxembourg

Transitional allowances for former EU office holders - too few conditions?

15-12-2017

This study focuses on the transitional allowances for former office holders, covering the European Parliament, European Commission, President of the European Council and Secretary General of the Council of the European Union, Court of Justice, Court of Auditors, European Investment Bank, European Central Bank, the Ombudsman and the European Data Protection Supervisor. The arrangements for these institutions are contrasted with approaches in European Union Member States, third countries and international ...

This study focuses on the transitional allowances for former office holders, covering the European Parliament, European Commission, President of the European Council and Secretary General of the Council of the European Union, Court of Justice, Court of Auditors, European Investment Bank, European Central Bank, the Ombudsman and the European Data Protection Supervisor. The arrangements for these institutions are contrasted with approaches in European Union Member States, third countries and international organisations. Room for improvement is identified regarding the effectiveness of transitional allowances, e.g. in terms of preventing conflicts of interest.

Auteur externe

Dr. Christoph Demmke, Roland Blomeyer, Dr. Mike Beke

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