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Non-formal learning: Access and validation

10-12-2018

Learning happens in different contexts, over the course of a lifetime, following various possible educational paths, as shown in Figure 1. In adult life, learning ranges from programmes that impart basic skills, learning groups engaged in raising awareness on various issues, mature students at university, open and distance learning, on-the-job training, courses that combine theory with practice, and classes or other learning activities taken in pursuit of a special interest. This infographic explains ...

Learning happens in different contexts, over the course of a lifetime, following various possible educational paths, as shown in Figure 1. In adult life, learning ranges from programmes that impart basic skills, learning groups engaged in raising awareness on various issues, mature students at university, open and distance learning, on-the-job training, courses that combine theory with practice, and classes or other learning activities taken in pursuit of a special interest. This infographic explains the modalities that non-formal learning takes across Member States.

The Erasmus+ Programme (Regulation EU No. 1288/2013): European Implementation Assessment

06-07-2016

This European Implementation Assessment has been provided to accompany the work of the European Parliament’s Committee on Culture and Education in scrutinising the implementation of the Erasmus+ programme. The Erasmus+ programme for Union action in the field of education, training, youth and sport was launched on 1 January 2014 and will run until 31 December 2020. It brings together seven successful programmes which operated separately between 2007 and 2013 (the Lifelong Learning Programme, five ...

This European Implementation Assessment has been provided to accompany the work of the European Parliament’s Committee on Culture and Education in scrutinising the implementation of the Erasmus+ programme. The Erasmus+ programme for Union action in the field of education, training, youth and sport was launched on 1 January 2014 and will run until 31 December 2020. It brings together seven successful programmes which operated separately between 2007 and 2013 (the Lifelong Learning Programme, five international cooperation programmes and the Youth in Action programme), and also adds the area of sports activities. The opening analysis of this Assessment, prepared in-house by the Ex-Post Impact Assessment Unit within EPRS, situates the programme within the context of educationpolicy, explains its legal framework and provides key information on its implementation. The presentation is followed by opinions and recommendations of selected stakeholders. A separate chapter is dedicated to the sport, which is the new element of the Erasmus+ programme. Input to the EIA was also received from two independent groups of experts representing the Technical University of Dresden and the University of Bergen, and the Turku University of Applied Sciences.- The first research paper presents implementation of Key Action 1 (KA1) – Learning mobility of individuals in the field of education, training and youth.- The second research paper presents implementation of Key Action 2 (KA2)– Cooperation for innovation and the exchange of good practices in the field of education, training and youth. The two research papers, containing key findings and recommendations, are includedin full as annexes to the in-house opening analysis.

Údar seachtarach

- Research paper analysing the implementation of the Erasmus+ programme – Learning mobility of individuals in the field of education, training and youth (Key Action 1), written by Prof. Dr. Thomas Köhler from the Technical University of Dresden and Prof. Dr. Daniel Apollon from the University of Bergen - Research paper analysing the implementation of the Erasmus+ programme – Cooperation for innovation and the exchange of good practices in the field of education, training and youth (Key Action 2), written by Dr. Juha Kettunen from the Turku University of Applied Sciences

Adult Education and Open Educational Resources

15-09-2015

This study reviews the current use of Open Educational Resources in Adult Education, assesses its potential and makes recommendations for policy interventions, taking account of the European Commission’s policy frameworks. It incorporates new research on over 12 Member States, leveraging on a synthesis of existing research from a range of projects including POERUP (Policies for OER Uptake) and a 2014-15 study on Shared OER for the Joint Research Centre, augmented by two more recent studies for JRC ...

This study reviews the current use of Open Educational Resources in Adult Education, assesses its potential and makes recommendations for policy interventions, taking account of the European Commission’s policy frameworks. It incorporates new research on over 12 Member States, leveraging on a synthesis of existing research from a range of projects including POERUP (Policies for OER Uptake) and a 2014-15 study on Shared OER for the Joint Research Centre, augmented by two more recent studies for JRC and LLP.

Údar seachtarach

Paul Bacsich, with additional research from Giles Pepler, Sara Frank Bristow, Ebba Ossiannilsson, Alistair Creelman, Eva Szalma and Ilmars Slaidins (Sero Consulting Ltd, the UK)

Improving the financial literacy of European consumers

20-05-2015

The 2008 financial crisis highlighted consumers’ low level of understanding of financial products, which they often deemed too complex. It therefore exposed the lack of financial literacy among consumers, financial literacy being a combination of awareness, knowledge, skill, attitude and behaviour necessary to make sound financial decisions and achieve financial wellbeing. Earlier this year, the Swiss National Bank decision to discontinue its currency ceiling, leading to the sudden leap in value ...

The 2008 financial crisis highlighted consumers’ low level of understanding of financial products, which they often deemed too complex. It therefore exposed the lack of financial literacy among consumers, financial literacy being a combination of awareness, knowledge, skill, attitude and behaviour necessary to make sound financial decisions and achieve financial wellbeing. Earlier this year, the Swiss National Bank decision to discontinue its currency ceiling, leading to the sudden leap in value of the Swiss franc (CHF) – with a direct impact on all CHF-denominated loans in the European Union – again revealed a persistent lack of financial literacy among certain consumers, as they were unable to predict this financial risk and consequently to fulfil their loan obligations. A 2012 Eurobarometer survey showed that many consumers do not receive advice when purchasing financial product or services and that 52% of them tend to opt for the first product they see when obtaining a current bank account or a credit card. Major hurdles to financially sound behaviour appear to lie in individuals' psychological habits, culture, social and economic background. Levels of financial literacy can be improved directly through financial education, as well as indirectly by ensuring a good level of consumer protection in the financial sector and enabling consumers to make informed choices with appropriate advice, standardised information and comparison tools for financial products. Research shows that most people seem to learn through experience (or even more through adverse experience), but consumers also have a tendency to forget fast, making it necessary to repeat lessons in various forms.

Commitments Made at the Hearing of Marianne Thyssen - Commissioner-Designate

04-11-2014

Briefing summarises the commitments made at the hearing of Marianne Thyssen Commissioner designate for Employment, Social Affairs, Skills and Labour Mobility.

Briefing summarises the commitments made at the hearing of Marianne Thyssen Commissioner designate for Employment, Social Affairs, Skills and Labour Mobility.

Erasmus for All (2014-2020)

16-04-2012

The proposed Erasmus for All programme (2014-2020) envisions bringing together a wide range of EU activities in higher, school, vocational and adult education, youth policy and grassroots sports. This briefing note presents and reviews the proposed context, architecture, content, and management structure. Further, it makes ten recommendations to ensure that the proposed programme not only seeks to streamline management efficiency but also pays sufficient attention to the individual policy needs of ...

The proposed Erasmus for All programme (2014-2020) envisions bringing together a wide range of EU activities in higher, school, vocational and adult education, youth policy and grassroots sports. This briefing note presents and reviews the proposed context, architecture, content, and management structure. Further, it makes ten recommendations to ensure that the proposed programme not only seeks to streamline management efficiency but also pays sufficient attention to the individual policy needs of the various sectors. Finally, it gives a detailed outline of the planned action and budget allocation.

Údar seachtarach

Guy Haug and Bernd Wächter

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