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A new neighbourhood, development and international cooperation instrument

29-11-2019

In the context of the Commission's proposal for a multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, on 14 June 2018 the Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), with a proposed budget of €89.2 billion (in current prices). Parliament adopted its first-reading position in plenary on 27 March 2019. MEPs agreed to accept a single instrument, but called for a stronger role for Parliament ...

In the context of the Commission's proposal for a multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the 2021-2027 period, on 14 June 2018 the Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), with a proposed budget of €89.2 billion (in current prices). Parliament adopted its first-reading position in plenary on 27 March 2019. MEPs agreed to accept a single instrument, but called for a stronger role for Parliament on secondary policy choices, through delegated acts, and for the budget for the instrument to be increased by nearly €4 billion, to €93.154 billion. MEPs also specifically called for an increase in the funds allocated to human rights and democracy activities, the percentage of funding that fulfils the criteria for official development assistance, and funds that support climate and environmental objectives. Moreover, Parliament's amendments include the introduction of gender mainstreaming targets, the earmarking of certain financial allocations, the suspension of assistance in case of human rights violations, and the reduction of the emerging challenges and priorities cushion to €7 billion. The Council adopted a partial mandate on 13 June 2019, and an additional mandate – on the European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD+) – on 25 September 2019. Following the committees' decision of 8 October 2019 to enter into interinstitutional negotiations on the basis of Parliament's first-reading position, a first trilogue meeting took place on 23 October 2019. The second is scheduled for 5 December 2019. Fourth edition. The 'Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Origins of the 2019-24 EU Strategic Agenda: The Future of Europe debate and the Sibiu European Council

10-10-2019

The Sibiu Summit of 9 May 2019 and the subsequent adoption of the 2019-24 Strategic Agenda on 20 June 2019 constitute the end of the Future of Europe debate (at least in its current iteration), which was initiated following the June 2016 UK referendum on EU membership. Throughout the Future of Europe process, EU Heads of State or Government reiterated three core messages that also featured prominently in all the milestone documents: the need for unity, priority to EU citizens, and focus on (policy ...

The Sibiu Summit of 9 May 2019 and the subsequent adoption of the 2019-24 Strategic Agenda on 20 June 2019 constitute the end of the Future of Europe debate (at least in its current iteration), which was initiated following the June 2016 UK referendum on EU membership. Throughout the Future of Europe process, EU Heads of State or Government reiterated three core messages that also featured prominently in all the milestone documents: the need for unity, priority to EU citizens, and focus on (policy) delivery. Moreover, the three policy priorities – migration, security and the economy – identified in the Bratislava Declaration, have been the focus over the entire period of the Future of Europe process (June 2016 to June 2019), forming the European Council's 'rolling agenda' of policy priorities.

Reconciliation in the Western Balkans: The difficulty of emulating the EU model

17-04-2019

In 2017, the European Union turned 60, celebrating not only six decades of peace between its Member States but also integration – based on a framework for a peaceful European ethos – which helped bring reconciliation to its citizens that would have otherwise been impossible to achieve. In the Western Balkans, which were torn apart by wars after the disintegration of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, conflicting narratives about the past continue to charge intra-regional relations with animosity ...

In 2017, the European Union turned 60, celebrating not only six decades of peace between its Member States but also integration – based on a framework for a peaceful European ethos – which helped bring reconciliation to its citizens that would have otherwise been impossible to achieve. In the Western Balkans, which were torn apart by wars after the disintegration of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, conflicting narratives about the past continue to charge intra-regional relations with animosity, and a number of bilateral disputes await resolution. Just as the European Communities helped to bring peace to post-World War II western Europe, so does the EU promote the reconciliation process in the countries that were once part of Yugoslavia. A credible promise of accession to the EU for all Western Balkan countries gives them an incentive to improve their working relationships and work on reconciliation more vigorously. Since 2017, the EU has renewed its attempts to infuse the Western Balkan countries' enlargement process with fresh energy. In a March 2018 statement, the EU High Representative, Federica Mogherini, said it was 'time to close the wounds of the past' and take steps to guarantee stability for the whole of Europe. The European Commission's new enlargement strategy of February 2018, apart from placing special emphasis on solving all bilateral disputes, highlights reconciliation as a prerequisite for EU accession, and envisages a dedicated flagship initiative. This briefing aims to draw attention to the importance of reconciliation, both as part of the Western Balkans' EU integration process and as an answer to the region's widely perceived need to come to terms with the past. Civil-society representatives and experts often see reconciliation in the region as a prerequisite for building sustainable cooperation in many areas and a process that would help local youth to overcome their prejudices and restore their trust in their countries and region. However, achieving reconciliation requires cooperation in practice, something that will likely take decades to accomplish.

Thinking about the future of Europe: 'Ideas Papers' for the European Parliament Administration's Innovation Day

08-02-2019

This compendium contains a set of 12 'Ideas Papers' prepared by policy analysts in the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) to stimulate discussion at the various sessions of the January 2019 Innovation Day, with a view to the European Parliament administration’s preparations for the coming 2019-2024 parliamentary term.

This compendium contains a set of 12 'Ideas Papers' prepared by policy analysts in the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) to stimulate discussion at the various sessions of the January 2019 Innovation Day, with a view to the European Parliament administration’s preparations for the coming 2019-2024 parliamentary term.

Establishing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument

10-10-2018

As part of the group of specific IAs accompanying the MFF proposals, this IA provides a detailed overview of the proposed regulation establishing the new NDICI focusing on the main considerations behind the large-scale overhaul of the existing financial framework in the field of EU external policy. The Commission has engaged broadly with a wide range of stakeholders and did a thorough stock-taking through a mid-term review of ten existing instruments. However as alternative options are not elaborated ...

As part of the group of specific IAs accompanying the MFF proposals, this IA provides a detailed overview of the proposed regulation establishing the new NDICI focusing on the main considerations behind the large-scale overhaul of the existing financial framework in the field of EU external policy. The Commission has engaged broadly with a wide range of stakeholders and did a thorough stock-taking through a mid-term review of ten existing instruments. However as alternative options are not elaborated beyond a brief comparison of advantages and risks of merging the existing instruments into a broader one, it remains rather difficult to fully assess the proposed merger of different instruments as the only option available. Finally, a clearer account of how the stakeholder views fed into the analysis and a more thorough response to the scrutiny of the RSB, would have benefited this impact assessment.

The Impact of the UK’s Withdrawal on EU Integration

09-07-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, examines the potential effects of the UK’s withdrawal on European integration. It does so by examining the UK’s role in pushing forward and/or blocking integration in five areas: the internal market; social policy; freedom, security and justice; the Eurozone; and foreign, security and defence.

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, examines the potential effects of the UK’s withdrawal on European integration. It does so by examining the UK’s role in pushing forward and/or blocking integration in five areas: the internal market; social policy; freedom, security and justice; the Eurozone; and foreign, security and defence.

Údar seachtarach

Dr Tim OLIVER Dr Garvan WALSHE Professor Catherine BARNARD Professor Linda HANTRAIS Professor Matthias MATTHIJS Professor Steven PEERS

Alcide De Gasperi: Democracy beyond borders

15-05-2018

Alcide De Gasperi was born at the end of the 19th century, and grew up in a region of the Austro-Hungarian Empire mainly populated by Italians. From his youth, he was committed to politics and journalism. He was a clear opponent of fascism, and faced strong political persecution from Mussolini’s regime. After some time in prison, he found refuge in the Vatican, where he worked for 14 years. After the Second World War, he involved himself heavily in the construction of the Italian Republic, through ...

Alcide De Gasperi was born at the end of the 19th century, and grew up in a region of the Austro-Hungarian Empire mainly populated by Italians. From his youth, he was committed to politics and journalism. He was a clear opponent of fascism, and faced strong political persecution from Mussolini’s regime. After some time in prison, he found refuge in the Vatican, where he worked for 14 years. After the Second World War, he involved himself heavily in the construction of the Italian Republic, through the Christian Democratic Party. He was President of the Council (prime minister) between 1945 and 1953. He developed a consensual method of government, trying to involve as much as possible the various Italian political parties. In the field of foreign policies, one of his main contributions was to advocate tirelessly for the return of Germany to the concert of nations, in the face of the growing threat posed by the Soviet Union. For this reason, he also became a passionate advocate of the European Defence Community. Therefore, in the light of his commitment, it is no surprise that the 1957 Treaties creating the European Economic Community and Euratom were signed in Rome.

Permanent structured cooperation (PESCO): From notification to establishment

08-12-2017

On 13 November 2017, 23 EU Member States signed a joint notification addressed to the Council and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice-President of the European Commission (HR/VP) on their intention to participate in PESCO. The Council is now expected to formally establish PESCO, possibly before the end of the year.

On 13 November 2017, 23 EU Member States signed a joint notification addressed to the Council and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice-President of the European Commission (HR/VP) on their intention to participate in PESCO. The Council is now expected to formally establish PESCO, possibly before the end of the year.

Euro-area reform [What Think Tanks are thinking]

01-12-2017

The Heads of State or Government of the countries sharing the euro currency will hold a summit on 15 December 2017 to discuss ways to improve the functioning of the euro area. European Council President Donald Tusk, who also chairs the Euro Summit, has said that the discussion will focus on further steps to complete Banking Union and on setting the direction for deeper euro-area economic integration, with decisions to be taken in June 2018. European Union Member States which are not members of the ...

The Heads of State or Government of the countries sharing the euro currency will hold a summit on 15 December 2017 to discuss ways to improve the functioning of the euro area. European Council President Donald Tusk, who also chairs the Euro Summit, has said that the discussion will focus on further steps to complete Banking Union and on setting the direction for deeper euro-area economic integration, with decisions to be taken in June 2018. European Union Member States which are not members of the 19-nation euro bloc, other than the UK, have also been invited to the Euro Summit. Among proposals floated are that the single currency area should have a budget and a finance minister and that the existing euro-area bailout fund, the European Stability Mechanism (ESM), should be transformed into a European Monetary Fund. Germany, in particular, is cautious about far-reaching reforms. This note brings together commentaries, analyses and studies by major international think tanks and research institutes on euro area reforms and related issues.