4

rezultat(a)

Riječ(i)
Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
Ključna riječ
Datum

Unaccompanied migrant children in Greece: New relocation scheme

15-05-2020

In response to increased migratory pressure in Greece along the EU's external border with Turkey in recent months, and following the Greek government's request for support under Article 78(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the European Commission has launched a new relocation scheme to speed up the relocation of unaccompanied minors from the Greek islands to other EU Member States. Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson, who has been entrusted with taking this ...

In response to increased migratory pressure in Greece along the EU's external border with Turkey in recent months, and following the Greek government's request for support under Article 78(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the European Commission has launched a new relocation scheme to speed up the relocation of unaccompanied minors from the Greek islands to other EU Member States. Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson, who has been entrusted with taking this process forward, will also work in coordination with the Greek government and stakeholders to find sustainable ways to ensure that unaccompanied minors staying in the first-line reception and identification centres ('hotspots') on the Greek islands receive the care and protection they are entitled to. Regardless of a child's reasons for migrating, their situation or status, they all are first and foremost children and have rights as such. Unaccompanied children or children who have been separated from their parents along the way, are, moreover, entitled to special protection under international human rights and European Union asylum law. All too often, however, their rights and needs are neglected. Human rights organisations have repeatedly denounced the precarious and difficult conditions in which unaccompanied minors are living in the Greek hotspots. The proposed relocation initiative is urgently needed. However, the ongoing political and academic debate also shows a clear need for more structural solutions, in the form of more solidarity and responsibility-sharing among EU Member States, and a coordinated, child rights-based approach to addressing the many protection gaps unaccompanied children face when arriving in Europe.

Children's rights in the EU: Marking 30 years of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

13-11-2019

Adopted in 1989, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) was the first international instrument to explicitly recognise children as human beings with innate rights. Ratified by 197 countries, including all EU Member States, it has become the landmark treaty on children's rights, outlining universal standards for the care, treatment, survival, development, protection and participation of all children. The promotion and protection of children's rights is one of the key objectives ...

Adopted in 1989, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) was the first international instrument to explicitly recognise children as human beings with innate rights. Ratified by 197 countries, including all EU Member States, it has become the landmark treaty on children's rights, outlining universal standards for the care, treatment, survival, development, protection and participation of all children. The promotion and protection of children's rights is one of the key objectives embedded in Article 3(3) of the Treaty on European Union (TEU). Moreover, Article 24 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU recognises that children are entitled to 'protection and care as is necessary for their well-being'. The same article recognises that the child's best interests should be the primary consideration for public authorities and private institutions. Over the years, the EU has moved from a sectoral approach towards a more coherent policy approach. Whereas initially, children's rights were developed in relation to specific areas such as the free movement of persons, since 2000 the EU has taken a more coordinated line. This Briefing takes stock of the most recent EU action to address and promote children's rights and looks at the upcoming challenges.

Easier acceptance of public documents

02-06-2016

In May, the European Parliament is due to vote on a proposal for a regulation on promoting the free movement of citizens and businesses by simplifying the requirements for presenting certain public documents issued by another Member State. The proposal, one of the key initiatives presented by the Commission during the European Year of Citizens in 2013, is also intended to contribute to the European Union's ‘Justice for growth’ policy.

In May, the European Parliament is due to vote on a proposal for a regulation on promoting the free movement of citizens and businesses by simplifying the requirements for presenting certain public documents issued by another Member State. The proposal, one of the key initiatives presented by the Commission during the European Year of Citizens in 2013, is also intended to contribute to the European Union's ‘Justice for growth’ policy.

Updated rules for Europol

02-05-2016

In May, the European Parliament is due to vote on the compromise text for a revised regulation on the EU Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation – Europol, aimed at boosting the agency's powers to fight terrorism and serious and organised crime, while increasing its accountability towards the European Parliament and national parliaments and formulating clear rules for data exchange and protection.

In May, the European Parliament is due to vote on the compromise text for a revised regulation on the EU Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation – Europol, aimed at boosting the agency's powers to fight terrorism and serious and organised crime, while increasing its accountability towards the European Parliament and national parliaments and formulating clear rules for data exchange and protection.