10

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Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
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Ključna riječ
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EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Regional policy

28-06-2019

The principal aim of the EU's regional policy, also known as cohesion policy, is to address the territorial, social and economic imbalances that exist between the different regions of the EU. Regional policy covers all regions and cities of the European Union, helping to support job creation, business competitiveness, economic growth, sustainable development, and to improve citizens' quality of life. To achieve these goals and address the diverse development needs in all EU regions, €351.8 billion ...

The principal aim of the EU's regional policy, also known as cohesion policy, is to address the territorial, social and economic imbalances that exist between the different regions of the EU. Regional policy covers all regions and cities of the European Union, helping to support job creation, business competitiveness, economic growth, sustainable development, and to improve citizens' quality of life. To achieve these goals and address the diverse development needs in all EU regions, €351.8 billion – almost one third of the total EU budget – has been set aside for cohesion policy for the 2014-2020 period. This financial support is distributed through two main funds: the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF). Together with the European Social Fund (ESF), the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF), they make up the European structural and investment (ESI) funds, which provide support that can make a real difference to the lives of people in the EU's regions. With the current programming period (2014-2020) drawing to a close, work is now under way on planning the cohesion policy priorities for the next programming period (2021-2027). During its 2014-2019 term the European Parliament was called upon numerous times to adopt new legislative acts, amend older rules and to provide opinions on many topics relating to the EU's regional policy. Within the European Parliament, the Committee on Regional Policy is responsible for the Union's regional development and cohesion policy, as set out in the Treaties. In anticipation of its expected withdrawal from the EU, the UK, until now a net contributor to the EU budget, will no longer contribute to the post-2020 EU budget, which means that the EU will have fewer resources to allocate to its policies in the future, including cohesion policy. The European Parliament has, however, strongly advocated maintaining the level of funding for cohesion policy at its current level or even increasing it. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Employment barriers in border regions: Strategies and EU funding

15-01-2019

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways ...

This study draws primarily on available literature, as well as on information gathered from interviews to examine barriers to employment in border regions. The study first outlines cross-border labour mobility trends and drivers. It then looks at barriers to cross-border labour mobility before assessing measures - including legislation, key programmes and initiatives, and funding structures - adopted at EU-level to address them. The study concludes by presenting a series of recommendations on ways to facilitate cross-border labour mobility going forward. This analysis has been produced by Policy Department A at request of the EMPL Committee to feed into its work on the European Social Fund Plus.

Living with a Neurological Brain Disorder: Taking Control of Your Life

14-10-2016

This report summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop on the neurological brain disorders, held at the European Parliament in Brussels on Wednesday 12 October 2016. The aim of the workshop was to provide background information about the main characteristics of neurological brain disorders, as well as to identify new strategies and innovative tools to better support the prevention and treatment of these diseases. The latest data, trends, and challenges in the field of neurological ...

This report summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop on the neurological brain disorders, held at the European Parliament in Brussels on Wednesday 12 October 2016. The aim of the workshop was to provide background information about the main characteristics of neurological brain disorders, as well as to identify new strategies and innovative tools to better support the prevention and treatment of these diseases. The latest data, trends, and challenges in the field of neurological brain disorders were highlighted during the first part of the workshop. Moreover, speakers illustrated how mHealth tools can better support treatment for patients affected by brain disorders. Successful examples of mHealth tools, such as the app “MyDystonia”, were also presented. The second part of the workshop focused on the potential offered by mHealth for patients with neurological brain disorders. Relevant initiatives carried out by the European Commission were presented, and the importance of involving patients in the designing of new mHealth tools for the treatment of brain disorders was also discussed. This workshop and the respective document were prepared by the Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety.

Vanjski autor

Alojz PETERLE, Linda McAVAN, Nessa CHILDERS, Frédéric DESTREBECQ, Monika BENSON, Nicholas MEYER, Jean-Pierre LIN, Terje PEETSO and Nicola BEDLINGTON

Early childhood education and care in family-friendly policies

04-05-2016

Early childhood education and care (ECEC) services for children – from birth to compulsory primary school age – form an essential part of policies for work-life balance and for better social cohesion. A policy mix of flexible labour market arrangements, generous leave policies and quality ECEC services allows choices for parents, and at the same time supports the healthy development of their children. Member States are increasingly establishing well-functioning, efficient systems. Investing in early-years ...

Early childhood education and care (ECEC) services for children – from birth to compulsory primary school age – form an essential part of policies for work-life balance and for better social cohesion. A policy mix of flexible labour market arrangements, generous leave policies and quality ECEC services allows choices for parents, and at the same time supports the healthy development of their children. Member States are increasingly establishing well-functioning, efficient systems. Investing in early-years services brings the greatest returns, and is generally more successful than later remedial action. Until recently, ECEC was mainly considered as a vehicle for helping parents, primarily women, to (re)integrate into the labour market across the EU. Lately, there has been a growing awareness about its multiple benefits for children's personal development and social integration, including mitigating inequalities and preparing for later employability. This is particularly the case for disadvantaged children. The quality of life of young children is an important element in building smart, inclusive and productive societies. Quality accessible ECEC is an indispensable part of ensuring a quality childhood and building a resilient society.

Measuring well-being and progress: Looking beyond GDP

04-03-2014

Gross domestic product (GDP), a measure of national economic production, has come to be used as a general measure of well-being and progress in society, and as a key indicator in deciding a wide range of public policies. However GDP does not take into account non-economic factors such as social issues and the environment. In the aftermath of the crisis, the EU needs reliable, transparent and convincing measures for evaluating progress.

Gross domestic product (GDP), a measure of national economic production, has come to be used as a general measure of well-being and progress in society, and as a key indicator in deciding a wide range of public policies. However GDP does not take into account non-economic factors such as social issues and the environment. In the aftermath of the crisis, the EU needs reliable, transparent and convincing measures for evaluating progress.

Work-life balance: Measures to help reconcile work, private and family life

27-05-2013

Good work-life balance promotes the well-being of workers and can contribute to achieving other EU policy goals. However currently more than one worker in five expresses dissatisfaction with their personal situation. Acheiving work-life balance can be made easier by family-oriented policies and flexibility in the organisation of work. It has been suggested that 2014 be designated the European Year for Reconciling Work and Family Life.

Good work-life balance promotes the well-being of workers and can contribute to achieving other EU policy goals. However currently more than one worker in five expresses dissatisfaction with their personal situation. Acheiving work-life balance can be made easier by family-oriented policies and flexibility in the organisation of work. It has been suggested that 2014 be designated the European Year for Reconciling Work and Family Life.

Eco-Efficient Transport

15-04-2013

An affordable, efficient and clean transport system is a basic pillar for economic growth and the quality of life in European countries. However, transport is still accompanied by a broad range of negative impacts on human health and the environment. It is still using huge amounts of finite resources. Congestion is increasingly hampering the efficiency of the system. Transport volumes are expected to further grow in the future. So, a transition to a more eco-efficient transport system is needed to ...

An affordable, efficient and clean transport system is a basic pillar for economic growth and the quality of life in European countries. However, transport is still accompanied by a broad range of negative impacts on human health and the environment. It is still using huge amounts of finite resources. Congestion is increasingly hampering the efficiency of the system. Transport volumes are expected to further grow in the future. So, a transition to a more eco-efficient transport system is needed to cope with recent challenges and anticipated future developments in the transport sector. Against this background, the STOA Project on “Eco-Efficient Transport” aimed at assessing to what extent different concepts and approaches can help to increase the eco-efficiency of the transport system. To allow the required systemic perspective, the assessment was supported by scenario building. The feasibility and desirability of the scenarios and their elements was the subject of a stakeholder consultation. This report is the final report (Deliverable 5) of the project. It summarises the previous phases of the project and draws conclusions on that basis. The previous reports, Deliverables 2, 2b, 3, and 4, are available online on the STOA homepage at: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/stoa/cms/home/publications/studies

Vanjski autor

Jens Schippl (Project leader), Markus Edelman, Maike Puhe and Max Reichenbach (Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis - ITAS , Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT)

Proceedings of the Workshop on "Active and Healthy Ageing : A Challenge for the EU to Create Age-Friendly Environments"

15-11-2012

This report summarises the presentations and discussions at the Workshop on “Active and Healthy Ageing: A challenge for the EU to create age-friendly environments”, held at the European Parliament in Brussels, on Monday 8 October 2012. The aim of the workshop was to exchange views on how to face the consequences of an ageing population and to provide input into the on-going policy discussions at EU-level on active and healthy ageing. The workshop was hosted by MEP Kartika T. Liotard (GUE/NGL, NL) ...

This report summarises the presentations and discussions at the Workshop on “Active and Healthy Ageing: A challenge for the EU to create age-friendly environments”, held at the European Parliament in Brussels, on Monday 8 October 2012. The aim of the workshop was to exchange views on how to face the consequences of an ageing population and to provide input into the on-going policy discussions at EU-level on active and healthy ageing. The workshop was hosted by MEP Kartika T. Liotard (GUE/NGL, NL), Member of the ENVI Committee and Co-chair of the European Parliament Intergroup on Ageing and Intergenerational Solidarity.

Vanjski autor

Klea Katsouyanni (University of Athens Medical School, EL) , Michel Hamon (University Pierre & Marie Curie, French Academy of Medicine, FR) , Jean Pierre Baeyens (University of Luxembourg, LU) , Peter Kopelman (University of London, UK) , Torsten Zuberbier (GA²LEN, Charite-Universitatsmedizin, Berlin, DE) and Jaap Koot (University Medical Centre Groningen, NL)

Revising the Maternity Leave Directive

21-10-2011

The first reading of the revision, proposed in 2008, to the Maternity Leave Directive has yet to be concluded. The EP has adopted its position, voting, inter alia, to increase minimum paid leave beyond the Commission's proposal. In the Council, however, progress has halted, with many Member States expressing strong reservations over both Commission and EP positions.

The first reading of the revision, proposed in 2008, to the Maternity Leave Directive has yet to be concluded. The EP has adopted its position, voting, inter alia, to increase minimum paid leave beyond the Commission's proposal. In the Council, however, progress has halted, with many Member States expressing strong reservations over both Commission and EP positions.

Bullying at Work

01-08-2001

Bullying at work: Phenomenon which is not a single action but a series of one or several different harassing actions over a period of time. The study considers the current legal situation in the Member States of the European Union. It also offers propositions to fight workplace bullying and investigates how far the European Union could possibly carry those measures into effect.

Bullying at work: Phenomenon which is not a single action but a series of one or several different harassing actions over a period of time. The study considers the current legal situation in the Member States of the European Union. It also offers propositions to fight workplace bullying and investigates how far the European Union could possibly carry those measures into effect.

Vanjski autor

Frank Lorho, Ulrich HILP

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