26

eredmény(ek)

Szó/szavak
Kiadványtípus
Szakpolitikai terület
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CAP Amending Regulation (CMO): Amending regulations on the CMO for agricultural products, quality schemes and measures for remote regions

10-10-2019

On 1 July 2018, as part of the work on the EU's 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, the European Commission proposed a package of three regulations with the aim of reshaping and modernising the common agricultural policy (CAP). One of these proposals, the Amending Regulation, introduces changes to rules governing the common market organisation (CMO) in agricultural products (including the rules on wine), the EU quality schemes (geographical indications) and the support measures for remote ...

On 1 July 2018, as part of the work on the EU's 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, the European Commission proposed a package of three regulations with the aim of reshaping and modernising the common agricultural policy (CAP). One of these proposals, the Amending Regulation, introduces changes to rules governing the common market organisation (CMO) in agricultural products (including the rules on wine), the EU quality schemes (geographical indications) and the support measures for remote regions. The aim is to equip agricultural markets and support measures to face new challenges, update provisions, simplify procedures and ensure consistency with other regulations on the future CAP.

The EU fruit and vegetable sector: Main features, challenges and prospects

11-03-2019

Fruit and vegetables accounted for approximately 14 % of the total value of the EU's agricultural production in 2018. This is a fundamental sector for many EU Member States, especially those where it is particularly well developed, such as in the Mediterranean region and in some northern and eastern European countries. Moreover, all EU Member States produce at least a few types of fruit and vegetables. Apples and tomatoes are the main products of the richly diversified produce of the EU's fruit and ...

Fruit and vegetables accounted for approximately 14 % of the total value of the EU's agricultural production in 2018. This is a fundamental sector for many EU Member States, especially those where it is particularly well developed, such as in the Mediterranean region and in some northern and eastern European countries. Moreover, all EU Member States produce at least a few types of fruit and vegetables. Apples and tomatoes are the main products of the richly diversified produce of the EU's fruit and vegetable farms. Mostly small-sized with relatively high labour input, these farms earn incomes ranging from average (for fruit specialists) to very high (for horticulture specialists, including also flower and ornamental plant production). EU trade in fruit and vegetables is characterised by the predominance of internal over external flows, where the EU is traditionally a net importer. To strengthen the resilience of both the fruit and vegetable sector and its operators, and to boost the consumption of their produce, the EU has in place a comprehensive support system, especially through the regulatory framework for the common organisation of the markets in agricultural products. Rules on producer organisations and their operational programmes, crisis management and marketing standards, help the functioning of the sector, with additional support from the EU school fruit and vegetables scheme, as well as from the EU promotion and quality policies, income support and rural development measures, valid for all agricultural sectors. Recently passed EU legislation has already brought in important adjustments for the fruit and vegetable sector and no further major policy changes are currently anticipated. It will be its capacity to overcome its structural vulnerability and weak organisation, adopt innovation and respond to consumer needs that will shape its future.

Research for AGRI Committee – New competition rules for the agri-food chain in the CAP post 2020

14-09-2018

In connection with the next reform of the CAP post 2020, the Commission has proposed a new Regulation (COM(2018)394 of 1 June 2018) on the common market organisation, amending Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 of 13 December 2013 (amended by Regulation (EU) No 2017/2393 of 13 December 2017). This draft regulation does not, however, cover questions on the relationship between the CAP and competition; the proposal does not contain any provisions concerning the responsibilities of professional and interbranch ...

In connection with the next reform of the CAP post 2020, the Commission has proposed a new Regulation (COM(2018)394 of 1 June 2018) on the common market organisation, amending Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 of 13 December 2013 (amended by Regulation (EU) No 2017/2393 of 13 December 2017). This draft regulation does not, however, cover questions on the relationship between the CAP and competition; the proposal does not contain any provisions concerning the responsibilities of professional and interbranch organisations and the possible conditions of their submission to competition rules. The recent Omnibus Regulation (EU) No 2017/2393 has made changes to the legal framework for the application of competition rules to the agreements and practices of farmers and their associations. However, this new legislative framework is not yet entirely consistent and, in the light of the Court of Justice judgment handed down on 14 November 2017 in the Endive case, the progress ought to be consolidated and clarified in order to guarantee the real effectiveness of these provisions and greater legal certainty for operators. This study analyses the development of the relationship between the CAP and the competition rules and highlights the need to take corrective action with respect to current farming legislation to ensure that the CAP has primacy over the competition rules and the implementation of the objectives set out in Article 39 of the Treaty.

Külső szerző

C. Del Cont; A. Iannarelli

The future of the EU's sheep and goat sector

30-04-2018

Sheep and goat sector production constitutes just a small share of the output of the EU livestock sector as a whole, but this farming activity's importance is much broader in terms of its social and economic contribution to remote rural areas, not to mention the environmental contribution it makes through the provision of public goods such as landscape and biodiversity conservation. Economic and structural difficulties do not help the sector's growth and this means that the EU is not self-sufficient ...

Sheep and goat sector production constitutes just a small share of the output of the EU livestock sector as a whole, but this farming activity's importance is much broader in terms of its social and economic contribution to remote rural areas, not to mention the environmental contribution it makes through the provision of public goods such as landscape and biodiversity conservation. Economic and structural difficulties do not help the sector's growth and this means that the EU is not self-sufficient but relies on imports to top up supply to its market for sheep and goats. The sector's traditional and emerging needs and the need for policy measures to address them are at the core of an own-initiative report due to be voted during the May I plenary session.

Research for AGRI Committee - CAP implementation: Flexibility given to Member States - state of play and perspectives

15-05-2017

This study discusses flexibility of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) from various angles. The current flexibility does not create major conflicts with the objectives of the CAP. It makes decision-making more dispersed over the Member States, but also more effective. There may be small adverse effects on the level playing field. On the positive side, flexibility allows Member States to address specific problems and pursue heterogeneous and/or geographically bound goals. This should be regarded ...

This study discusses flexibility of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) from various angles. The current flexibility does not create major conflicts with the objectives of the CAP. It makes decision-making more dispersed over the Member States, but also more effective. There may be small adverse effects on the level playing field. On the positive side, flexibility allows Member States to address specific problems and pursue heterogeneous and/or geographically bound goals. This should be regarded as bounded targeting, not renationalisation.

Külső szerző

Ida Terluin, Petra Berkhout, Tuomas Kuhmonen

Conciliation agreement on the 2017 EU budget

25-11-2016

On the final day of the three-week conciliation period, the negotiating teams of the European Parliament and Council reached provisional agreement on next year's EU budget. The joint text, which sets total commitments at €157.86 billion and total payments at €134.49 billion, is scheduled for adoption by the Council on 29 November and vote by the EP in plenary two days later.

On the final day of the three-week conciliation period, the negotiating teams of the European Parliament and Council reached provisional agreement on next year's EU budget. The joint text, which sets total commitments at €157.86 billion and total payments at €134.49 billion, is scheduled for adoption by the Council on 29 November and vote by the EP in plenary two days later.

Research for PECH Committee - Small-Scale Fisheries Markets: Value Chain, Promotion and Labelling

15-04-2016

The revised Common Market Organisation (CMO) is a great opportunity for small-scale fisheries (SSF) producers to better access the market and to compete successfully with imported fishery products. The aim of intervention is to give the consumer the opportunity to buy a fresh, safe, and environmentally-friendly product, and to guarantee an acceptable income to local SSF fishers.

The revised Common Market Organisation (CMO) is a great opportunity for small-scale fisheries (SSF) producers to better access the market and to compete successfully with imported fishery products. The aim of intervention is to give the consumer the opportunity to buy a fresh, safe, and environmentally-friendly product, and to guarantee an acceptable income to local SSF fishers.

Külső szerző

Helga Josupeit

CAP simplification: State of play

05-01-2016

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) for 2014-2020, with a budget of €408.31 billion and more than 7 million beneficiaries across Europe, was approved in 2013. At Member State level, implementation began in 2015 and is still ongoing. In this context, simplification of the CAP is an objective shared by the European institutions as well as national administrations, stakeholders, and above all, farmers. The Commission considers CAP simplification to be a key priority, even more today than in the past ...

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) for 2014-2020, with a budget of €408.31 billion and more than 7 million beneficiaries across Europe, was approved in 2013. At Member State level, implementation began in 2015 and is still ongoing. In this context, simplification of the CAP is an objective shared by the European institutions as well as national administrations, stakeholders, and above all, farmers. The Commission considers CAP simplification to be a key priority, even more today than in the past, as confirmed by Agriculture Commissioner Phil Hogan's address to the European Parliament Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development in December 2014. The Commission has already started the simplification process, and at the end of 2015 put forward a technical simplification package consisting of delegated and implementing acts. Another simplification package is scheduled for spring 2016. In May 2015, at the European Parliament hearing on 'How to simplify the Common Agricultural Policy', some Members insisted that, if the Commission were serious about simplifying the CAP and reducing bureaucracy, it would need to review the legal text and not simply make changes by way of secondary legislation. Nonetheless, it appears unlikely that a major restructuring of the basic architecture of the CAP will take place in the current programming period. Instead, a fine-tuning or light review of certain of its elements might be anticipated. More substantial proposals for a post 2020 CAP might be presented only after 2017, in line with the communication on the post 2020 Multiannual Financial Framework. In this context, particularly regarding the political elements of the CAP, the role of the European Parliament, as co-legislator, is significant and will be of utmost importance for an effective simplification process.

Measures to support dairy farmers after the end of EU milk quotas

09-10-2015

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with ...

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with an overall rise in global demand which could offer opportunities to the sector, the challenges to be faced in coming years are numerous. The current tensions regarding milk prices and the 2009 milk price crisis demonstrate that market liberalisation and dependence on international markets can increase market instability and price volatility. At its plenary session in July 2015, the European Parliament voted on an own-initiative resolution on prospects for the EU dairy sector. It suggested that a series of tools could be developed or improved for the milk sector, such as establishing compulsory written contracts between milk producers and processors, enhancing the role of producer organisations and the recently-created Milk Market Observatory and tackling unfair trading practices in the food chain. The European Parliament also proposed pursuing new trade agreements, and improving information and promotion programmes for the dairy sector and school milk scheme, as well as new measures to protect farmers' profit margins. In September 2015, the European Commission presented a €500 million package to support European dairy farmers. This briefing updates 'The future of the EU dairy sector after the end of milk quotas', published in June 2015.

The future of the EU dairy sector after the end of milk quotas

24-06-2015

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with ...

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with an overall rise in global demand which could offer opportunities to the sector, the challenges to be faced in coming years are numerous. The current tensions regarding milk prices and the 2009 milk price crisis demonstrate that market liberalisation and dependence on international markets can increase market instability and price volatility. At the July 2015 plenary session, Parliament is due to vote on an own-initiative report on prospects for the EU dairy sector. The report addresses the concerns arising from the end of milk quotas and any subsequent market volatility. It suggests that a series of tools could be developed or improved, such as establishing compulsory written contracts between milk producers and processors, enhancing the role of producer organisations and the recently-created Milk Market Observatory, tackling unfair trading practices in the food chain, pursuing new trade agreements, and improving information and promotion programmes for the dairy sector and school milk scheme, as well as new measures to protect farmers' profit margins.

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