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The future of the EU's sheep and goat sector

30-04-2018

Sheep and goat sector production constitutes just a small share of the output of the EU livestock sector as a whole, but this farming activity's importance is much broader in terms of its social and economic contribution to remote rural areas, not to mention the environmental contribution it makes through the provision of public goods such as landscape and biodiversity conservation. Economic and structural difficulties do not help the sector's growth and this means that the EU is not self-sufficient ...

Sheep and goat sector production constitutes just a small share of the output of the EU livestock sector as a whole, but this farming activity's importance is much broader in terms of its social and economic contribution to remote rural areas, not to mention the environmental contribution it makes through the provision of public goods such as landscape and biodiversity conservation. Economic and structural difficulties do not help the sector's growth and this means that the EU is not self-sufficient but relies on imports to top up supply to its market for sheep and goats. The sector's traditional and emerging needs and the need for policy measures to address them are at the core of an own-initiative report due to be voted during the May I plenary session.

Strategia di diplomazia economica dell'UE

03-03-2017

L'ordine creato a seguito della Seconda guerra mondiale è in fase di profondi cambiamenti dovuti alla globalizzazione e all'emergere di nuove potenze economiche. L'economia ha gradualmente assunto il ruolo di principale fattore di influenza politica e la globalizzazione attualmente supera le precedenti divisioni nazionali o regionali. Nel momento in cui l'UE emergeva quale attore economico globale, la crisi economica e finanziaria ha reso più pressante la necessità di accedere ai mercati esteri. ...

L'ordine creato a seguito della Seconda guerra mondiale è in fase di profondi cambiamenti dovuti alla globalizzazione e all'emergere di nuove potenze economiche. L'economia ha gradualmente assunto il ruolo di principale fattore di influenza politica e la globalizzazione attualmente supera le precedenti divisioni nazionali o regionali. Nel momento in cui l'UE emergeva quale attore economico globale, la crisi economica e finanziaria ha reso più pressante la necessità di accedere ai mercati esteri. La creazione del Servizio europeo per l'azione esterna (SEAE), comprendente le delegazioni dell'UE, e la nuova competenza dell'UE in materia di investimenti esteri diretti a norma del trattato di Lisbona hanno conferito all'Unione gli strumenti per assumere un'identità indipendente nella diplomazia economica. Di conseguenza, la politica dell'UE di promozione delle imprese si è convertita in una strategia di diplomazia economica molto più sofisticata, gestita in maniera maggiormente strutturata da parte della Commissione e del SEAE. Il Parlamento europeo deve ora partecipare all'elaborazione di questa nuova strategia, al di là del suo ruolo legislativo e di controllo. Il Parlamento europeo non solo può contribuire al dibattito, ma può anche aiutare la Commissione e il SEAE con la sua tradizione consolidata di diplomazia parlamentare.

Tailor-Made Support for SMEs towards Effective Implementation of the EU’s Trade and Investment Strategy

02-05-2016

A Workshop on Tailor-made support for SMEs towards effective implementation of the EU's trade and investment strategy took place in the European Parliament on 17 February 2016. Professor Blackburn gave an analysis on SME internationalisation and policy interventions, and representatives of SMEs shared their experiences in this field.

A Workshop on Tailor-made support for SMEs towards effective implementation of the EU's trade and investment strategy took place in the European Parliament on 17 February 2016. Professor Blackburn gave an analysis on SME internationalisation and policy interventions, and representatives of SMEs shared their experiences in this field.

Autore esterno

Robert BLACKBURN

Measures to support dairy farmers after the end of EU milk quotas

09-10-2015

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with ...

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with an overall rise in global demand which could offer opportunities to the sector, the challenges to be faced in coming years are numerous. The current tensions regarding milk prices and the 2009 milk price crisis demonstrate that market liberalisation and dependence on international markets can increase market instability and price volatility. At its plenary session in July 2015, the European Parliament voted on an own-initiative resolution on prospects for the EU dairy sector. It suggested that a series of tools could be developed or improved for the milk sector, such as establishing compulsory written contracts between milk producers and processors, enhancing the role of producer organisations and the recently-created Milk Market Observatory and tackling unfair trading practices in the food chain. The European Parliament also proposed pursuing new trade agreements, and improving information and promotion programmes for the dairy sector and school milk scheme, as well as new measures to protect farmers' profit margins. In September 2015, the European Commission presented a €500 million package to support European dairy farmers. This briefing updates 'The future of the EU dairy sector after the end of milk quotas', published in June 2015.

TTIP: Challenges and Opportunities in the Area of Customs and Trade Facilities

31-08-2015

The trade costs associated with customs and other border controls become more important as tariff barriers are reduced. The EU is in the process of further modernisation of is customs code. It also needs to work with the EU’s trading partners to facilitate trade while protecting consumer interests and the security of the international supply chain. The negotiations on TTIP offer a means of building on existing agreements to further this aim. This paper is about how to make customs more efficient. ...

The trade costs associated with customs and other border controls become more important as tariff barriers are reduced. The EU is in the process of further modernisation of is customs code. It also needs to work with the EU’s trading partners to facilitate trade while protecting consumer interests and the security of the international supply chain. The negotiations on TTIP offer a means of building on existing agreements to further this aim. This paper is about how to make customs more efficient. Others in this series of eight, prepared by Policy Department A for the IMCO Committee, cover the substantive issues in technical barriers to trade, services, procurement and the sectors of textiles and clothing, motor vehicles and machinery sectors. A further paper covers the horizontal issues in regulatory cooperation.

The future of the EU dairy sector after the end of milk quotas

24-06-2015

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with ...

Milk is produced in every EU Member State and EU milk production is growing. As the leading worldwide exporter of many dairy products, the EU is a major player in the global dairy market; within the Union, dairy is an essential agricultural sector with significant economic, social and territorial importance. For more than 30 years, EU milk supply was managed by the EU milk quota system, which expired at the end of March 2015. Although long-term market prospects are generally quite positive, with an overall rise in global demand which could offer opportunities to the sector, the challenges to be faced in coming years are numerous. The current tensions regarding milk prices and the 2009 milk price crisis demonstrate that market liberalisation and dependence on international markets can increase market instability and price volatility. At the July 2015 plenary session, Parliament is due to vote on an own-initiative report on prospects for the EU dairy sector. The report addresses the concerns arising from the end of milk quotas and any subsequent market volatility. It suggests that a series of tools could be developed or improved, such as establishing compulsory written contracts between milk producers and processors, enhancing the role of producer organisations and the recently-created Milk Market Observatory, tackling unfair trading practices in the food chain, pursuing new trade agreements, and improving information and promotion programmes for the dairy sector and school milk scheme, as well as new measures to protect farmers' profit margins.

Helping – or Not – European Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) Venture Abroad

15-09-2014

Various EU initiatives to supporting the internationalisation of European SMEs fall short of the European Parliament's expectations. Although independent evaluations of the European Business Centres in India, China and Thailand suggested that bold decisions were necessary, the European Commission has only adopted some changes to the measures. Using budget appropriations from the previous budget framework, the Commission plans to support the current structures until the end of their contracts – which ...

Various EU initiatives to supporting the internationalisation of European SMEs fall short of the European Parliament's expectations. Although independent evaluations of the European Business Centres in India, China and Thailand suggested that bold decisions were necessary, the European Commission has only adopted some changes to the measures. Using budget appropriations from the previous budget framework, the Commission plans to support the current structures until the end of their contracts – which have been extended in some cases. The Commission also plans to geographically extend its business support in third countries – also financed by the ICI+ programme. Under the EU's budgetary procedure, the European Parliament has only oversight over the implementation of inefficient structures. As Member States require tailor-made support to turn-around declining exports, small and medium-sized enterprises should first be supported through the Member States, and then perhaps by the EU.

Information and Promotion Measures for Agricultural Products on the Internal Market and in Third Countries: Initial Appraisal of the Commission's Impact Assessment

15-01-2014

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment accompanying its proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on information provision and promotion measures for agricultural products on the internal market and in third countries (COM (2013) 812 final which was submitted on 21 November 2013. It analyses whether the principal criteria laid down in the Commission’s own Impact Assessment Guidelines ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment accompanying its proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on information provision and promotion measures for agricultural products on the internal market and in third countries (COM (2013) 812 final which was submitted on 21 November 2013. It analyses whether the principal criteria laid down in the Commission’s own Impact Assessment Guidelines, as well as additional factors identified by the Parliament in its Impact Assessment Handbook, appear to be met by the IA. It does not attempt to deal with the substance of the proposal. It is drafted for informational and background purposes to assist the relevant parliamentary committee and Members more widely in their work.

European SMEs and International Trade

23-02-2012

According to the Europe 2020 flagship Communication on an Integrated Industrial Policy and the review of the Small Business Act, supporting the internationalization process of the European SMEs is crucial to promote EU competitiveness. Recent data shows that 85% of new jobs, in the EU, between 2002 and 2010 were created by SMEs. However, a very small percentage of SMEs is active beyond the Single Market, notwithstanding rapidly growing market opportunities abroad. The two key questions in the Workshop ...

According to the Europe 2020 flagship Communication on an Integrated Industrial Policy and the review of the Small Business Act, supporting the internationalization process of the European SMEs is crucial to promote EU competitiveness. Recent data shows that 85% of new jobs, in the EU, between 2002 and 2010 were created by SMEs. However, a very small percentage of SMEs is active beyond the Single Market, notwithstanding rapidly growing market opportunities abroad. The two key questions in the Workshop were : (1) what are the best policies supporting SMEs in accessing third markets and (2) is a better coordination between national and EU-level initiatives needed, and if so, how to accomplish this. The INTA Committee had requested the organization of the Workshop in order to explore proposals for implementing new strategies to improve the internationalization process.

Autore esterno

ANTOLDI Fabio (Catholic University of Milan, Italy), SASS Magdolna (ICEG European Centre, Hungary) and SMALLBONE David (Kingston University London, United Kingdom)

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