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Regulation of OTC derivatives: Amending the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR)

28-06-2019

The European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR – Regulation (EU) No 648/2012), adopted in 2012, forms part of the European regulatory response to the financial crisis, and specifically addresses the problems observed in the functioning of the 'over-the-counter' (OTC) derivatives market in the 2007-2008 period. In May 2017, after carrying out an extensive assessment of EMIR, the Commission proposed a regulation amending and simplifying it in the context of its Regulatory Fitness and Performance ...

The European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR – Regulation (EU) No 648/2012), adopted in 2012, forms part of the European regulatory response to the financial crisis, and specifically addresses the problems observed in the functioning of the 'over-the-counter' (OTC) derivatives market in the 2007-2008 period. In May 2017, after carrying out an extensive assessment of EMIR, the Commission proposed a regulation amending and simplifying it in the context of its Regulatory Fitness and Performance (REFIT) programme, to address disproportionate compliance costs, transparency issues and insufficient access to clearing for certain counterparties. A provisional agreement was reached in trilogue on 5 February 2019. Parliament voted to approve that agreement on 18 April 2019 in plenary session and the Council subsequently adopted it on 14 May. The new regulation comes into force on 17 June 2019. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European Market Infrastructure Regulation-Regulatory Fitness and Performance (REFIT) proposal

15-12-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying its above-mentioned proposal amending the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR), submitted on 4 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs. The IA accompanying a subsequent Commission proposal (COM(2017) 331), also amending the EMIR regulation, as regards the authorisation of central counterparties and the ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying its above-mentioned proposal amending the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR), submitted on 4 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs. The IA accompanying a subsequent Commission proposal (COM(2017) 331), also amending the EMIR regulation, as regards the authorisation of central counterparties and the recognition of third-country central counterparties, will be analysed in a forthcoming initial appraisal. This proposal is part of the Commission's REFIT programme, which stands for Regulatory Fitness and Performance. One of the stated aims of this programme is to make EU law 'simpler, lighter, more efficient and less costly' (Better Regulation Guidelines of 2015, p. 91). EMIR, adopted in 2012, forms part of the European regulatory response to the financial crisis. It specifically addresses the problems observed in the functioning of the over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives market from the 2007-2008 financial crisis onwards.

Control of the acquisition and possession of weapons

23-06-2017

In the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks, in November 2015 the European Commission presented a package of measures aiming to tighten control on the acquisition and possession of firearms in the European Union, improve traceability of legally held firearms and enhance cooperation between Member States, as well as ensure that deactivated firearms are rendered inoperable. The proposal to amend the current 'Firearms Directive' (Directive 91/477/EEC) was part of this package. It aimed to ban some ...

In the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks, in November 2015 the European Commission presented a package of measures aiming to tighten control on the acquisition and possession of firearms in the European Union, improve traceability of legally held firearms and enhance cooperation between Member States, as well as ensure that deactivated firearms are rendered inoperable. The proposal to amend the current 'Firearms Directive' (Directive 91/477/EEC) was part of this package. It aimed to ban some semi-automatic firearms for civilian use, as well as to include some previously excluded actors (collectors and brokers) and blank-firing weapons within the scope of the Directive. Parliament and Council reached agreement on the proposal in December, and formally adopted it in March and April respectively. The new directive reduces the number of weapons categories and changes the classification of certain types of weapons, while strictly defining exceptions for civilian use of the most dangerous weapons. It entered into force on 13 June 2017, with the deadline for transposition of most provisions set at 14 September 2018. This updates a briefing of January 2017, drafted by Jana Valant: PE 595.875.

Revision of the Firearms Directive

10-03-2017

A week after the Paris terrorist attack in November 2015, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend the directive on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons. The changes aim to introduce tighter controls on civilian use of firearms, improve traceability of legally held weapons and strengthen cooperation between Member States. Several rounds of trilogue negotiations produced an initial agreement in December 2016, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

A week after the Paris terrorist attack in November 2015, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend the directive on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons. The changes aim to introduce tighter controls on civilian use of firearms, improve traceability of legally held weapons and strengthen cooperation between Member States. Several rounds of trilogue negotiations produced an initial agreement in December 2016, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

The Role and Activities of Employment Agencies

14-06-2013

This study provides an overview of the importance and activities of employment agencies as well as their legal framework (WTO, ILO, EU) in the EU Member States and closely examines their role in selected countries, while focusing on temporary work agencies, a significantly growing market within the EU. Due to limited data, there is no clear-cut result on the agencies’ longer-term impact. However, the four identified market types (market driven, social dialogue based, legislator driven and emerging ...

This study provides an overview of the importance and activities of employment agencies as well as their legal framework (WTO, ILO, EU) in the EU Member States and closely examines their role in selected countries, while focusing on temporary work agencies, a significantly growing market within the EU. Due to limited data, there is no clear-cut result on the agencies’ longer-term impact. However, the four identified market types (market driven, social dialogue based, legislator driven and emerging markets) are analysed through country cases regarding national regulations, the treatment of workers and everyday functioning of the agencies. It becomes evident that there is a wide diversity of the branch, which needs to be taken into account when reviewing EU Directive 2008/104/EC.

Išorės autorius

Werner Eichhorst (IZA) , Michela Braga (Fondazione Rodolfo DeBenedetti) , Andrea Broughton (Institute for Employment Studies) , An de Coen (IDEA consult) , Henri Culot (UCL Leuven) , Filip Dorssemont (UCL Leuven) , Ulrike Famira-Mühlberger (WIFO) , Maarten Gerard (IDEA consult) , Ulrike Huemer (WIFO) , Michael J. Kendzia (IZA) , Jakob Louis Pedersen (NIRAS) and Ewa Slezak (Krakow University of Economics)

Protecting the financial interests of the Union: The role of administrative investigations

28-03-2013

The European Anti-fraud Office (OLAF) is the EU body responsible for administrative investigations to fight illegal activities detrimental to the EU's financial interests. Since its creation in 1999, OLAF has completed 3 500 investigations, which have led to the recovery of EU resources worth €1.1 billion (excluding financial penalties). A proposal to reform OLAF is currently on the table. This aims to increase the efficiency, effectiveness and accountability of the Office, while maintaining its ...

The European Anti-fraud Office (OLAF) is the EU body responsible for administrative investigations to fight illegal activities detrimental to the EU's financial interests. Since its creation in 1999, OLAF has completed 3 500 investigations, which have led to the recovery of EU resources worth €1.1 billion (excluding financial penalties). A proposal to reform OLAF is currently on the table. This aims to increase the efficiency, effectiveness and accountability of the Office, while maintaining its independence for investigations.

Technology Across Borders - Exploring Perspectives for Pan-European Parliamentary Technology Assessment (Study and Options Brief)

15-11-2011

Parliamentary Technology Assessment (PTA) in Europe has been initiated and developed first in countries in northern and western parts of Europe and later also in Southern Europe. The main objective of this study is to trace the evolution of PTA from the Office of Technology Assessment in the US to a future pan-European participatory PTA and to deliver images of PTA future. Overall, the main type of effect of PTA on parliaments is raising their knowledge on specific technology or societal problems ...

Parliamentary Technology Assessment (PTA) in Europe has been initiated and developed first in countries in northern and western parts of Europe and later also in Southern Europe. The main objective of this study is to trace the evolution of PTA from the Office of Technology Assessment in the US to a future pan-European participatory PTA and to deliver images of PTA future. Overall, the main type of effect of PTA on parliaments is raising their knowledge on specific technology or societal problems and their technological solutions. However, the institutional settings of the PTA organisations shape the type of influence these PTA organisations have on parliamentary decision-making. In order to ensure successful pan-European PTA cooperation, several conditions have to be fulfilled. These comprise having a PTA structure in countries all over Europe, an interface between scientists and politicians by creating a mutual language, the inclusion of the public and civil society organisations, the creation of a meeting place where all stakeholders have an easy access and, last but not least, the need for PTA to be mainstreamed within regional, national and European parliaments.

Išorės autorius

Christien Enzing, Jasper Deuten, Monique Rijnders-Nagle and Jon van Til

Study on Safety and Liability Issues Relating to Toys

17-01-2008

Išorės autorius

Dr Frank Alleweldt (Project director) Ms Anna Fielder (Lead author) Prof Geraint Howells (Legal analysis) Dr Senda Kara Ms Kristen Schubert Mr Stephen Locke

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