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Minimum income policies in EU Member states

14-04-2017

This document was prepared by Policy Department A for the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs to feed into its own-initiative report on “Minimum income policies as a tool to tackle poverty”. It is an update of the previous two studies published in 2007 and in 2011. It provides updated facts and figures on minimum schemes across EU Member States since 2010, an overview of the evolution of poverty and social exclusion and a summary of recent debates across Europe.

This document was prepared by Policy Department A for the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs to feed into its own-initiative report on “Minimum income policies as a tool to tackle poverty”. It is an update of the previous two studies published in 2007 and in 2011. It provides updated facts and figures on minimum schemes across EU Member States since 2010, an overview of the evolution of poverty and social exclusion and a summary of recent debates across Europe.

Išorės autorius

Chiara CREPALDI, Barbara DA ROIT, Claudio CASTEGNARO, Sergio PASQUINELLI

Precarious employment in Europe: Country cases

23-08-2016

This note by Policy Department A gives a summary of the study "Precarious employment in Europe: Country cases". The study contains the results of eight country reviews carried out in the framework of the European Parliament study on Precarious Employment in Europe: Patterns, trends and policy strategies. The featured countries are Denmark, France, Germany, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

This note by Policy Department A gives a summary of the study "Precarious employment in Europe: Country cases". The study contains the results of eight country reviews carried out in the framework of the European Parliament study on Precarious Employment in Europe: Patterns, trends and policy strategies. The featured countries are Denmark, France, Germany, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

Išorės autorius

Andrea Broughton, Werner Eichhorst et al.

Vulnerable social groups: Before and after the crisis

11-07-2016

'Vulnerable social groups' are groups of people considered to be at risk of poverty or social exclusion because of physical disabilities, age factors, ethnic origins, lack of housing, or substance abuse. These people, who were already struggling with financial, social and employment difficulties before the 2008 economic crisis, have become further disadvantaged, and the gap between them and the rest of society has grown even wider. Three subgroups stand out as being most affected by the European ...

'Vulnerable social groups' are groups of people considered to be at risk of poverty or social exclusion because of physical disabilities, age factors, ethnic origins, lack of housing, or substance abuse. These people, who were already struggling with financial, social and employment difficulties before the 2008 economic crisis, have become further disadvantaged, and the gap between them and the rest of society has grown even wider. Three subgroups stand out as being most affected by the European economic and financial crisis. The number of people experiencing in-work poverty is rising, with economic constraints forcing them to work in increasingly precarious jobs or obliging them to accept self-employed status. Disabled people, already confronted by barriers hindering their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others, have, as a result of the crisis, lost a great deal of social, economic and mobility support and their chances of re-entering the labour market have diminished. Finally, changes in family structure mean that the number of single parents, especially single mothers, has increased in recent years. These parents struggle to achieve a work-life balance on account of their multiple obligations, and as a group they are also suffering from the effects of the crisis. The situation of vulnerable groups has been of concern to the European institutions for the last decade, from the point of view of poverty as well as of labour market participation and gender equality.

Poverty in the European Union: The crisis and its aftermath

16-03-2016

In 2010, as part of the Europe 2020 strategy, Member States agreed on a target to have at least 20 million fewer people in or at risk of poverty and social exclusion by 2020, thus reducing poverty from 116.4 million people to 96.4 million over the decade. Unfortunately, since the Strategy was adopted, the European Union has moved away from this target: there are now 6.7 million more people living in poverty or social exclusion across Europe compared to 2008 (EU-27). In 2012, almost one quarter of ...

In 2010, as part of the Europe 2020 strategy, Member States agreed on a target to have at least 20 million fewer people in or at risk of poverty and social exclusion by 2020, thus reducing poverty from 116.4 million people to 96.4 million over the decade. Unfortunately, since the Strategy was adopted, the European Union has moved away from this target: there are now 6.7 million more people living in poverty or social exclusion across Europe compared to 2008 (EU-27). In 2012, almost one quarter of the European population was at risk of poverty, on a 'wealthy continent'. Which subgroups of society were the most hit by the 'Great Recession'? What are the current drivers of poverty in Europe today? And what political actions are undertaken to fight against this new 21st century social scourge? Through a statistical analysis of the most recent trends in poverty in the European Union, this paper analyses the consequences of the crisis on the level and the nature of poverty in Europe and describes the political actions that are implemented to counter this phenomenon.

Invisible jobs: The situation of domestic workers

08-12-2015

Domestic workers are persons engaged in household services such as childcare, care of the elderly or housekeeping – via a formal or informal employment relationship. They can be nationals of the country or migrants, and can have varied working conditions, involving living within or outside the household. More than 80% of the domestic workers in the world are women. Due to the 'invisible' and sometimes illegal nature of their job, domestic workers are often confronted by problems such as low pay ...

Domestic workers are persons engaged in household services such as childcare, care of the elderly or housekeeping – via a formal or informal employment relationship. They can be nationals of the country or migrants, and can have varied working conditions, involving living within or outside the household. More than 80% of the domestic workers in the world are women. Due to the 'invisible' and sometimes illegal nature of their job, domestic workers are often confronted by problems such as low pay, irregular residence and employment conditions, no social security or benefits, no access to childcare facilities for their own children and limited time off work. Some subgroups, such as immigrants or live-in workers, are particularly vulnerable to discrimination. Despite initiatives in several European Union Member States, domestic workers are not always offered protection by national labour laws, and opportunities for 'decent work' can be limited. The implementation by the Member States of Convention No 189 and Recom¬mendation No 201 of the International Labour Organization (ILO) could provide domestic workers with guarantees of decent work and similar working conditions to those of workers in other economic sectors.

Main Causes of Female Poverty - Compilation

24-03-2015

Upon request by the FEMM Committee, these in-depth analyses highlight different aspects of female poverty. They complement two other Workshop contributions from a research project of the European Commission and from UNICEF. Wim van Lancker and his team examine the extent of women’s poverty in the EU and the impact of social exclusion through poverty on living and working conditions of women and their children. He concludes with a discussion of policy measures that have been taken in EU Member States ...

Upon request by the FEMM Committee, these in-depth analyses highlight different aspects of female poverty. They complement two other Workshop contributions from a research project of the European Commission and from UNICEF. Wim van Lancker and his team examine the extent of women’s poverty in the EU and the impact of social exclusion through poverty on living and working conditions of women and their children. He concludes with a discussion of policy measures that have been taken in EU Member States for enabling paid employment and ensuring adequate income protection. Diane Perrons explores the impact of the crisis on female poverty. Multiple differences exist among European Union Member States but overall poverty has increased and women are still more likely than men to live in poverty, though until 2012 the increase for men was greater than that for women. Economic performance and economic policies seem to be associated with poverty. The paper recommends that macroeconomic policy be mainstreamed to identify gender specific outcomes. Maria Stratigaki focuses on European policies and activities and the role of the European Social Fund in the fight against female poverty. She emphasises the need for developing a holistic methodological approach to face gendered poverty, going beyond tackling poverty exclusively via active labour market policies.

Išorės autorius

Wim Van Lancker, Vincent Corluy, Jeroen Horemans, Sarah Marchal and Julie Vinck (Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp, Belgium) ; Diane Perrons (Gender Institute, London School of Economics and Political Science, Tthe UK) ; Maria Stratigaki (Department of Social Policy, Panteion University, Greece)

Poverty risk, inequality and social exclusion

03-12-2014

The distribution of poverty, inequality and social exclusion varies significantly across EU Member States. Based on 2013 data, this infographic shows who is at risk, how equally disposable income is distributed,and how much EU countries spend on specific measures to combat poverty and social exclusion.

The distribution of poverty, inequality and social exclusion varies significantly across EU Member States. Based on 2013 data, this infographic shows who is at risk, how equally disposable income is distributed,and how much EU countries spend on specific measures to combat poverty and social exclusion.

Occupational Health and Safety Risks for the Most Vulnerable Workers

15-07-2011

Each of the groups of workers studied – women, ageing workers, workers with disabilities, young workers, migrant workers, temporary workers and low-qualified workers – faces specific occupational health and safety risks. While the EU has a strong body of legislation and a comprehensive strategy addressing worker health and safety, further action could be taken to protect vulnerable groups. Options are proposed, drawing on the analysis of needs as well as a review of specific measures implemented ...

Each of the groups of workers studied – women, ageing workers, workers with disabilities, young workers, migrant workers, temporary workers and low-qualified workers – faces specific occupational health and safety risks. While the EU has a strong body of legislation and a comprehensive strategy addressing worker health and safety, further action could be taken to protect vulnerable groups. Options are proposed, drawing on the analysis of needs as well as a review of specific measures implemented in the Member States.

Išorės autorius

Alice Belin, Tony Zamparutti, Kerina Tull and Guillermo Hernandez (Milieu Ltd, Brussels, Belgium)

The Role of Minimum Income for Social Inclusion in the EU 2007-2010

31-01-2011

In most EU countries some form of "minimum income" as a measure of "last resort" exists, which ensures a minimum standard of living for individuals and families who do not have sufficient resources. However, such schemes differ enormously as regards coverage and adequacy, as well as efficacy in reducing poverty and social exclusion. The present report moves on from a previous study commissioned by the European Parliament in 2007 to consider the evolution that has occurred in the meanwhile.

In most EU countries some form of "minimum income" as a measure of "last resort" exists, which ensures a minimum standard of living for individuals and families who do not have sufficient resources. However, such schemes differ enormously as regards coverage and adequacy, as well as efficacy in reducing poverty and social exclusion. The present report moves on from a previous study commissioned by the European Parliament in 2007 to consider the evolution that has occurred in the meanwhile.

Išorės autorius

Chiara Crepaldi (coordinator), Claudio Castegnaro and Sandra Naaf (Istituto per la Ricerca Sociale - IRS, Milano, Italy - with contribution of Daniela Mesini)

Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies

01-01-2011

This series of country-specific reviews of labour market and social policies examines policies and institutions and makes recommendations for improvements.

This series of country-specific reviews of labour market and social policies examines policies and institutions and makes recommendations for improvements.

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