30

rezultāts(-i)

Vārds(-i)
Publikācijas veids
Politikas joma
Jautājuma autors
Atslēgvārds
Datums

European climate pact - Pre-legislative synthesis of national, regional and local positions on the European Commission's initiative

26-10-2020

This briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of European system of multi-level governance. Based on EPRS analysis ...

This briefing forms part of an EPRS series offering syntheses of the pre-legislative state of play and consultation on key European Commission priorities during the current five-year term. It summarises the state of affairs in the relevant policy field, examines how existing policy is working on the ground, and, where possible, identifies best practice and ideas for the future on the part of governmental organisations at all levels of European system of multi-level governance. Based on EPRS analysis, partner organisations at European, national, regional and local levels point to the following main considerations that they consider should shape discussion of the forthcoming European climate pact: * In the area of energy-efficient building, the climate pact would offer added value in better coordinating the roles and responsibilities of different governmental levels, so as to increase the return on investment that would be felt by citizens. This could, for instance, be achieved by focusing investment on the largest energy consumers, such as public hospitals, schools and social housing. * In terms of low-carbon mobility, the climate pact would provide a platform to exchange ideas regarding the appropriate level of taxation for carbon-intensive means of transport, further tax reforms in the EU Member States to remove fossil fuel subsidies, and a shift of the tax burden towards polluters. * When it comes to working together on climate change, the climate pact would facilitate multi-level cooperation to ensure that the shared goals of climate neutrality translate into concrete action at the local and regional levels, which will eventually be responsible for implementing them, by 2050. This would in particular require improved integration of existing consultation strategies and developing new tools, including comparable geographical maps online. The overall input received indicates that the EU level is expected to set the standards in climate policy through 'shared leadership'. At the same time, each level of governance, from small isolated communities to large cities, and from regional governments and national parliaments to EU institutions, has generated concrete ways to contribute in this process, often by providing examples of good practice and lessons learnt, which could be applied and adapted across the EU.

Loan servicers and buyers and recovery of collateral

29-11-2018

The two IAs accompanying the proposal are similar in the knowledge base underpinning the work and the quality of data and sources. However, there seem to be qualitative differences in the way research, analysis and consultation activities were presented. In this respect, the IA on secondary markets has more room for improvement than the one on the out-of-court enforcement procedure The latter complies more fully with the Better Regulation Guidelines, for example in terms of analysis of effectiveness ...

The two IAs accompanying the proposal are similar in the knowledge base underpinning the work and the quality of data and sources. However, there seem to be qualitative differences in the way research, analysis and consultation activities were presented. In this respect, the IA on secondary markets has more room for improvement than the one on the out-of-court enforcement procedure The latter complies more fully with the Better Regulation Guidelines, for example in terms of analysis of effectiveness and efficiency, quantification, attention to social impacts and impacts on SMEs.

EU consumer protection rules

10-07-2018

The IA is aimed at underpinning new legislation in the field of consumer protection, as called for in various European Parliament resolutions. It represents a considerable body of work, based on extensive evaluation and consultation. Methodological weaknesses include the narrow range of options to calibrate the evaluation findings. Secondly, there are some presentation issues, which do not facilitate consideration of the Commission’s choices. For instance, the large space devoted to consultation ...

The IA is aimed at underpinning new legislation in the field of consumer protection, as called for in various European Parliament resolutions. It represents a considerable body of work, based on extensive evaluation and consultation. Methodological weaknesses include the narrow range of options to calibrate the evaluation findings. Secondly, there are some presentation issues, which do not facilitate consideration of the Commission’s choices. For instance, the large space devoted to consultation comes at the expense of useful and more sound information.

Strengthening the market surveillance of products

27-03-2018

An initial appraisal of the impact assessment suggests that methodological strengths outweigh the weaknesses in this overall convincing analysis. This impact assessment is underpinned by a substantial body of work and clearly shows expertise. Nonetheless, the impact assessment could have provided more information on the links with two pending legislative procedures. Its presentation could have further facilitated consideration of the choices made by the Commission.

An initial appraisal of the impact assessment suggests that methodological strengths outweigh the weaknesses in this overall convincing analysis. This impact assessment is underpinned by a substantial body of work and clearly shows expertise. Nonetheless, the impact assessment could have provided more information on the links with two pending legislative procedures. Its presentation could have further facilitated consideration of the choices made by the Commission.

European Market Infrastructure Regulation

10-01-2018

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying its proposal above, submitted on 13 June 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON). This proposal amends the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR), which is already in the process of being amended by two proposals currently under consideration in Parliament. The first proposal focused on the recovery and ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying its proposal above, submitted on 13 June 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON). This proposal amends the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR), which is already in the process of being amended by two proposals currently under consideration in Parliament. The first proposal focused on the recovery and resolution of central counterparties (CCPs). The second proposal proposed targeted amendments aiming to meet EMIR objectives in a more effective and efficient way. The current initiative under consideration focuses on the authorisation of CCPs and on the recognition of third-country CCPs. The impact assessment clearly identifies the problems that require EU action, as well as their drivers and consequences. The objectives of the initiative appear to be coherent with the analysis, and are relevant and measurable. The IA analyses a limited number of alternatives to the status quo in depth: two for each of the objectives, which deal respectively with EU and third-country central counterparties. These options are phrased in rather general terms and are left open to further development. The analysis is based on relevant sources and the Commission's expert knowledge in the field. However, the IA appears to have been prepared in a rather limited time-span and could have benefited from further work.

European Market Infrastructure Regulation-Regulatory Fitness and Performance (REFIT) proposal

15-12-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying its above-mentioned proposal amending the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR), submitted on 4 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs. The IA accompanying a subsequent Commission proposal (COM(2017) 331), also amending the EMIR regulation, as regards the authorisation of central counterparties and the ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying its above-mentioned proposal amending the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR), submitted on 4 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs. The IA accompanying a subsequent Commission proposal (COM(2017) 331), also amending the EMIR regulation, as regards the authorisation of central counterparties and the recognition of third-country central counterparties, will be analysed in a forthcoming initial appraisal. This proposal is part of the Commission's REFIT programme, which stands for Regulatory Fitness and Performance. One of the stated aims of this programme is to make EU law 'simpler, lighter, more efficient and less costly' (Better Regulation Guidelines of 2015, p. 91). EMIR, adopted in 2012, forms part of the European regulatory response to the financial crisis. It specifically addresses the problems observed in the functioning of the over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives market from the 2007-2008 financial crisis onwards.

Banking reform package

31-08-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the methodological strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying five proposals reforming banking legislation, submitted on 24 November 2016 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs. To this end, it also provides a brief overview of the IA, complementing the Commission's own summary (SWD(2016)378). Despite significant progress since the financial crisis, the overhaul of the ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the methodological strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying five proposals reforming banking legislation, submitted on 24 November 2016 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs. To this end, it also provides a brief overview of the IA, complementing the Commission's own summary (SWD(2016)378). Despite significant progress since the financial crisis, the overhaul of the financial regulatory framework remains a major area of the European Commission's work. The IA covers five proposals (see table 1, below) included in the 2017 Joint Declaration on the EU's legislative priorities, for which the EU institutions want to ensure substantial progress. The proposals aim at: aligning EU rules with internationally agreed standards, drawn up by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, and amending the current EU bank resolution framework.

Preventive restructuring, second chance and efficient restructuring, insolvency and discharge procedures

24-05-2017

This Commission impact assessment is based on a wealth of information drawing from both research and consultation. Research quoted spans the last decade and encompasses international organisation, academic and think tank work. The consultation performed by the Commission has been essential to prioritising the issues to be further harmonised and in choosing the detailed sub-options. Among the strengths of the IA, there is a genuine attempt to comply as much as possible with the Commission Better Regulation ...

This Commission impact assessment is based on a wealth of information drawing from both research and consultation. Research quoted spans the last decade and encompasses international organisation, academic and think tank work. The consultation performed by the Commission has been essential to prioritising the issues to be further harmonised and in choosing the detailed sub-options. Among the strengths of the IA, there is a genuine attempt to comply as much as possible with the Commission Better Regulation Guidelines and transparency in providing information. This is particularly evident in the broad range of options presented and in the presentation of the territorial impacts of the initiative. In this regard, for instance, the IA provides a useful legal analysis of the most important issues for most Member States. Nevertheless, economic impacts appear to be analysed more in depth than social and employment outcomes. Among the additional weaknesses, the numerous objectives identified are not time-bound and may be difficult to measure. Finally, although the IA states that Member States should not incur significant monitoring costs, the requirements in the IA appear to be shorter and less detailed than the ones in the Commission proposal.

Recovery and resolution of central counterparties

22-03-2017

This impact assessment builds a convincing case for action. It is mainly based on expert judgement by the Commission's departments and is backed up by relevant references, public consultation and coordination with international work-streams. The Commission states that the proposal, published in November 2016, is fully in line with the latest policy discussions and orientation by the Financial Stability Board and the G20, quoting a document from August 2016. Notwithstanding this, the Impact assessment ...

This impact assessment builds a convincing case for action. It is mainly based on expert judgement by the Commission's departments and is backed up by relevant references, public consultation and coordination with international work-streams. The Commission states that the proposal, published in November 2016, is fully in line with the latest policy discussions and orientation by the Financial Stability Board and the G20, quoting a document from August 2016. Notwithstanding this, the Impact assessment itself does not appear to have been fully updated since the summer of 2015. Therefore, some potentially important developments do not seem to be properly reflected in the IA. These include the recognition of non-EU central counterparties, the publication of new material, and the scenarios opened in the clearing world by the UK referendum of 23 June 2016.

European venture capital and social entrepreneurship funds

07-12-2016

This initial appraisal concludes that the Commission's impact assessment is based on sound knowledge and on relevant data relating to the investment funds industry. However, the evidence regarding specifically the two fund frameworks under review - European venture capital funds and European social entrepreneurship funds - is, by the IA's own admission, limited. The IA and the review attached to it do not cover all the points listed in the review clauses of the two regulations, for instance the geographical ...

This initial appraisal concludes that the Commission's impact assessment is based on sound knowledge and on relevant data relating to the investment funds industry. However, the evidence regarding specifically the two fund frameworks under review - European venture capital funds and European social entrepreneurship funds - is, by the IA's own admission, limited. The IA and the review attached to it do not cover all the points listed in the review clauses of the two regulations, for instance the geographical and sectoral distribution of investments undertaken specifically by EuVECA and EuSEF funds. At first sight, it appears that different conclusions could be drawn using the same data provided in the IA, for instance regarding the low take-up and lower than expected performance of the funds. The range of options analysed in depth seems rather narrow. Finally, the purpose of the existing regulations is to enhance the growth of small and medium-size enterprises and of social businesses. The IA states that it is too early to judge whether these objectives have been achieved and excludes this issue from the scope of the analysis. Even so, an initial analysis of the public consultations undertaken shows that, despite the absence of more concrete evidence, a greater effort could have been made to integrate the voice of non-financial businesses, including SMEs and social enterprises, within the IA.  

Gaidāmie notikumi

29-10-2020
Workshop on Open spaces at EU institutions versus traditional work spaces
Darbseminārs -
CONT
29-10-2020
Joint Hearing - Union Citizenship: Empowerment, Inclusion, Participation
Uzklausīšana -
AFCO JURI LIBE PETI
29-10-2020
EPRS online policy roundtable - America’s moment of destiny? US Presidential election
Cits pasākums -
EPRS

Partneri