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The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

18-05-2020

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people persists throughout the EU and takes various forms, including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as grounds of discrimination. However, the scope of the provisions dealing with this issue is limited and does not cover social protection, ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people persists throughout the EU and takes various forms, including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as grounds of discrimination. However, the scope of the provisions dealing with this issue is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education or access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship, or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies, and is the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally the preserve of Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is a further updated version of a briefing originally drafted by Piotr Bakowski. The previous edition was published in May 2019.

Unaccompanied migrant children in Greece: New relocation scheme

15-05-2020

In response to increased migratory pressure in Greece along the EU's external border with Turkey in recent months, and following the Greek government's request for support under Article 78(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the European Commission has launched a new relocation scheme to speed up the relocation of unaccompanied minors from the Greek islands to other EU Member States. Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson, who has been entrusted with taking this ...

In response to increased migratory pressure in Greece along the EU's external border with Turkey in recent months, and following the Greek government's request for support under Article 78(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the European Commission has launched a new relocation scheme to speed up the relocation of unaccompanied minors from the Greek islands to other EU Member States. Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson, who has been entrusted with taking this process forward, will also work in coordination with the Greek government and stakeholders to find sustainable ways to ensure that unaccompanied minors staying in the first-line reception and identification centres ('hotspots') on the Greek islands receive the care and protection they are entitled to. Regardless of a child's reasons for migrating, their situation or status, they all are first and foremost children and have rights as such. Unaccompanied children or children who have been separated from their parents along the way, are, moreover, entitled to special protection under international human rights and European Union asylum law. All too often, however, their rights and needs are neglected. Human rights organisations have repeatedly denounced the precarious and difficult conditions in which unaccompanied minors are living in the Greek hotspots. The proposed relocation initiative is urgently needed. However, the ongoing political and academic debate also shows a clear need for more structural solutions, in the form of more solidarity and responsibility-sharing among EU Member States, and a coordinated, child rights-based approach to addressing the many protection gaps unaccompanied children face when arriving in Europe.

Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies up to 2020: European Implementation Assessment

23-04-2020

This study provides a review of the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies (NRIS) up to 2020. It was produced at the request of the Committee for Civil Liberties. Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) and the Committee for Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) to feed into the discussions regarding the post-2020 Framework. The study provides a synthesis of evaluations and opinions of the Framework. It gives an appreciation of the coordination, consultation and monitoring structures and the ...

This study provides a review of the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies (NRIS) up to 2020. It was produced at the request of the Committee for Civil Liberties. Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) and the Committee for Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) to feed into the discussions regarding the post-2020 Framework. The study provides a synthesis of evaluations and opinions of the Framework. It gives an appreciation of the coordination, consultation and monitoring structures and the way they work out in practice. It also looks at the interplay with other EU legal, funding and policy instruments. It then reviews the main policy objectives, namely (Roma access to) education, employment, health, housing, as well as anti-discrimination and anti-gypsyism.

Employment and social situation in Germany

15-04-2020

This study of the labour market and social situation in Germany looks into major employment trends including atypical employment, unemployment and underemployment. It presents policy responses and major challenges for the future, such as digitisation and demographic change. Further, it explores policy action to fight poverty, trends in the German social partnership model and in the skills development system. Finally, it describes the contribution of the European Social Fund. The note covers aspects ...

This study of the labour market and social situation in Germany looks into major employment trends including atypical employment, unemployment and underemployment. It presents policy responses and major challenges for the future, such as digitisation and demographic change. Further, it explores policy action to fight poverty, trends in the German social partnership model and in the skills development system. Finally, it describes the contribution of the European Social Fund. The note covers aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ārējais autors

Nicola Duell, Tim Vetter

Education and employment of women in science, technology and the digital economy, including AI and its influence on gender equality

15-04-2020

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, provides evidence that there is still gender bias and inequality in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) fields and the digital sector (e.g., digital technologies, Computer Science, Information Technology, Information and Communication Technology, Artificial Intelligence, cybersecurity). This document, prepared at the request ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, provides evidence that there is still gender bias and inequality in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) fields and the digital sector (e.g., digital technologies, Computer Science, Information Technology, Information and Communication Technology, Artificial Intelligence, cybersecurity). This document, prepared at the request of the FEMM Committee (Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs, Directorate-General for Internal Policies), is intended to provide an up-to-date literature review on the current status of women’s education and employment in STEM fields and the digital sector. In so doing, the corresponding trajectories are examined, from the primary education level up to the employment level, in an attempt to identify obstacles and bottlenecks that prevent gender parity. Finally, suggestions for future research, initiatives and policies that would improve women’s participation in these areas are made.

Ārējais autors

Prof. Dr. Zacharias C. Zacharia, Research in Science and Technology Education Group, Department of Educational Sciences, University of Cyprus Dr. Tasos Hovardas, Research in Science and Technology Education Group, University of Cyprus; Dr. Nikoletta Xenofontos, Research in Science and Technology Education Group, University of Cyprus Ms Ivoni Pavlou, Research in Science and Technology Education Group, University of Cyprus;Ms Maria Irakleous, Research in Science and Technology Education Group, University of Cyprus

Violence against Women: Psychological violence and coercive control

16-03-2020

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, explores whether psychological violence against women is criminalised in select EU Member States, how data is collected regarding this particular form of gender based violence and, in close relation to this, whether custody and visiting rights of perpetrators are affected.

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, explores whether psychological violence against women is criminalised in select EU Member States, how data is collected regarding this particular form of gender based violence and, in close relation to this, whether custody and visiting rights of perpetrators are affected.

Ārējais autors

Petra JENEY, European Institution of Public Administration, in collaboration with Clara COTRONEO, Igor DIZDAREVIC, Virgil-Ivan CUCU, Tomasz KRAMER, Juan Diego RAMÍREZ-CÁRDENAS DÍAZ, Roberta RIBEIRO OERTEL, European Institution of Public Administration

What if artificial intelligence made work obsolete?

02-03-2020

How can we ensure an equitable distribution of costs and benefits of AI development? How should curriculums be updated for the digital age? How can continual learning be mobilised in anticipation of the next wave of workplace automation? How can we prepare for new career paths in the age of artificial intelligence? How can we protect platform workers and employers vulnerable to AI development?

How can we ensure an equitable distribution of costs and benefits of AI development? How should curriculums be updated for the digital age? How can continual learning be mobilised in anticipation of the next wave of workplace automation? How can we prepare for new career paths in the age of artificial intelligence? How can we protect platform workers and employers vulnerable to AI development?

Women in local and regional government: Still a long way from achieving parity

02-03-2020

Local and regional institutions have direct impacts on the everyday lives of their citizens. They are vital for women's empowerment, being both the level of governance responsible for service delivery and a potential stepping-stone to a career in public office at national and European level. When their own decision-making bodies are fully representative, the interests and experiences of multiple groups are included. Therefore, the equal representation of women and men at all levels of local governance ...

Local and regional institutions have direct impacts on the everyday lives of their citizens. They are vital for women's empowerment, being both the level of governance responsible for service delivery and a potential stepping-stone to a career in public office at national and European level. When their own decision-making bodies are fully representative, the interests and experiences of multiple groups are included. Therefore, the equal representation of women and men at all levels of local governance is a democratic imperative. After all, women form half the population and need to be better represented in power structures. The representation of women in local and regional assemblies across the EU continues to improve, albeit at a slow rate. However, a number of social, political and institutional obstacles hinder the involvement of women in regional and local government structures. As data show, progress towards equal representation in local and regional government remains slow. Furthermore, progress cannot be taken for granted: in certain EU countries, previous achievements have been reversed. A number of structural and societal barriers continue to hinder women from seeking office and from fulfilling their mandates or accessing leadership positions. In order to boost female representation in local/regional structures, various local and regional strategies have been adopted. The European Union has been a staunch advocate of women's participation in decision-making at all levels of governance. Gender equality is one of the founding values of the European Union, as can be seen in Article 2 and in Article 3, paragraph 3, of the Treaty on European Union. Article 8 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) also reiterates that one of the EU's missions is the elimination of inequalities and the promotion of equality between women and men in all its actions. The European Parliament has adopted a number of resolutions supporting gender balance measures in political decision-making. Nevertheless, laws determining local and regional participation fall within the remit of the EU Member States. This is an updated and expanded edition of an 'At a glance' note from March 2019, PE 635.549.

Gender equality in sports: (slowly) changing the game

27-02-2020

Even though women's presence and involvement in the Olympic Movement have progressively evolved, girls and women across the world still get fewer opportunities and less investment, training and corporate attention when they play sport. Today, there is still ample room for improvement when it comes to women's participation in sports governance structures.

Even though women's presence and involvement in the Olympic Movement have progressively evolved, girls and women across the world still get fewer opportunities and less investment, training and corporate attention when they play sport. Today, there is still ample room for improvement when it comes to women's participation in sports governance structures.

Beijing Platform for Action: 25-year review and future priorities

27-02-2020

Governments across the world, including the European Union (EU) Member States and the EU itself, committed to working towards gender equality and empowering all women and girls at the 1995 fourth United Nations (UN) World Conference on Women in Beijing. The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPfA) adopted at the conference is considered the international 'Bill of Rights' for women, defining women's rights as human rights and setting goals and concrete measures across a range of issues affecting ...

Governments across the world, including the European Union (EU) Member States and the EU itself, committed to working towards gender equality and empowering all women and girls at the 1995 fourth United Nations (UN) World Conference on Women in Beijing. The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPfA) adopted at the conference is considered the international 'Bill of Rights' for women, defining women's rights as human rights and setting goals and concrete measures across a range of issues affecting women and girls. In-depth national, regional and global reviews of its implementation and a set of priorities for future action will mark this 25th anniversary. The review concerning the EU and its Member States shows that efforts to improve gender equality have had some results, but persistent inequalities and gender gaps remain across all the areas of action covered in the BPfA. The collection and use of gender equality data has improved, but it is still uneven, making it difficult to measure the impacts of action and to identify the most disadvantaged groups of women. Gender mainstreaming is not yet applied systematically across all policy areas and funding programmes. Already present in 1995, political and cultural tensions around some areas of women's rights, such as bodily autonomy and control of fertility, have been exacerbated in recent years. In addition, emerging challenges such as climate change have gender dimensions that need to be taken into account. Looking forward, the EU and its Member States have the potential structures, actors and tools to advance gender equality. The European Parliament and women's organisations are urging the EU and national governments to demonstrate a high-level of political commitment in this area, defend the vision and commitments set out in the BPfA, and deliver an ambitious new agenda for the coming years. A more detailed statistical picture of the current situation in the EU and its Member States, in selected fields, is available in a separately published infographic.

Gaidāmie notikumi

03-06-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | One of Them: From Albert Square to Parliament Square
Cits pasākums -
EPRS
11-06-2020
CONT Public Hearing: Implementation of EU funds
Uzklausīšana -
CONT
11-06-2020
STOA Roundtable on Digital Sovereign Identity
Darbseminārs -
STOA

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