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Prudential requirements and supervision of investment firms

15-01-2020

Investment firms play an important role in capital markets, facilitating savings and investment flows across the EU. However, the current EU rules are seen as fragmented, overly complex, inconsistently applied and often a poor fit for the actual risks taken by the various types of investment firms. The Commission proposed a new regulation on the prudential requirements of investment firms and a new directive on the prudential supervision of investment firms. These proposals update the framework for ...

Investment firms play an important role in capital markets, facilitating savings and investment flows across the EU. However, the current EU rules are seen as fragmented, overly complex, inconsistently applied and often a poor fit for the actual risks taken by the various types of investment firms. The Commission proposed a new regulation on the prudential requirements of investment firms and a new directive on the prudential supervision of investment firms. These proposals update the framework for investment firms, making it more effective and more closely calibrated to the size and nature of the various investment firms and their risks. Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) agreed its report and negotiating mandate on 24 September 2018. On 20 March 2019, provisional agreements were reached by Parliament and Council negotiators. Parliament adopted the texts at first reading on 16 April 2019. Following linguistic corrections, corrigenda were endorsed by Parliament in October, and the regulation and directive were adopted by the Council then signed into law on 27 November. Both will apply in full from 26 June 2021. Second edition of a briefing originally drafted by David Eatock. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Country-specific recommendations: An overview (September 2019)

11-09-2019

This note provides an overview of the country-specific recommendations issued annually to EU Member States under the European Semester for economic policy coordination. It presents how these recommendations evolved over time (2012-2019), including from the legal base perspective. Finally, it shows how recommendations were implemented over the 2012-2018 European Semester cycles. The note is updated on a regular basis.

This note provides an overview of the country-specific recommendations issued annually to EU Member States under the European Semester for economic policy coordination. It presents how these recommendations evolved over time (2012-2019), including from the legal base perspective. Finally, it shows how recommendations were implemented over the 2012-2018 European Semester cycles. The note is updated on a regular basis.

EU framework for FDI screening

17-04-2019

On 13 September 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a framework for screening foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows into the EU on grounds of security or public order. The proposal was a response to a rapidly evolving and increasingly complex investment landscape. It aimed to strike a balance between maintaining the EU's general openness to FDI inflows and ensuring that the EU's essential interests are not undermined. Recent FDI trends and policies of ...

On 13 September 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a framework for screening foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows into the EU on grounds of security or public order. The proposal was a response to a rapidly evolving and increasingly complex investment landscape. It aimed to strike a balance between maintaining the EU's general openness to FDI inflows and ensuring that the EU's essential interests are not undermined. Recent FDI trends and policies of emerging FDI providers had cast doubt on the effectiveness of the decentralised and fragmented system of FDI screening – in use in only some EU Member States – to adequately address the potential (cross-border) impact of FDI inflows on security or public order without EU coordinated cooperation among all EU Member States. The proposal's objective was neither to harmonise the formal FDI screening mechanisms then used by almost half of the Member States, nor to replace them with a single EU mechanism. Instead, it aimed to enhance cooperation and information-sharing on FDI screening between the Commission and Member States, and to increase legal certainty and transparency. The European Parliament's Committee on International Trade (INTA) and the Council adopted their positions in May and June 2018 respectively, and interinstitutional negotiations concluded in November 2018 with a provisional text. That was first endorsed by the Member States' Permanent Representatives (Coreper) and by INTA in December 2018. After the text's adoption by the European Parliament and the Council in February and March 2019 respectively, it entered into force on 10 April 2019, and will apply from 11 October 2020, 18 months later. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

EU Statutory Audit Reform: Impact on costs, concentration and competition

09-04-2019

In this study we execute an in-depth analysis of the evolution of market concentration, competition and costs in the EU market for statutory auditing before and after the Audit Reform. Based on data from archival databases and a survey, we present evidence suggesting that rivalry between the largest audit suppliers increased, as did audit costs, non-Big 4 audit market share, and joint audit rates. Non-audit services (NAS) fees earned by the incumbent auditor decreased. This document was provided ...

In this study we execute an in-depth analysis of the evolution of market concentration, competition and costs in the EU market for statutory auditing before and after the Audit Reform. Based on data from archival databases and a survey, we present evidence suggesting that rivalry between the largest audit suppliers increased, as did audit costs, non-Big 4 audit market share, and joint audit rates. Non-audit services (NAS) fees earned by the incumbent auditor decreased. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) Committee.

Awtur estern

Marleen WILLEKENS, Simon DEKEYSER, Ines SIMAC

Public hearing with Elke König, Chair of the Single Resolution Board

29-03-2019

This note is prepared in view of a regular public hearing with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB), Elke König. The briefing addresses (i) recent supervisory developments or state of play with resolution cases (Carige, NordLB, Novo Banco and ABLV), (ii) summarises a recent General Court decision (‘Banca Tercas’) regarding the use of DGS in a preventative manner under State aid, (iii) points to regulatory developments regarding the completion of the Banking Union (resolution financing ...

This note is prepared in view of a regular public hearing with the Chair of the Single Resolution Board (SRB), Elke König. The briefing addresses (i) recent supervisory developments or state of play with resolution cases (Carige, NordLB, Novo Banco and ABLV), (ii) summarises a recent General Court decision (‘Banca Tercas’) regarding the use of DGS in a preventative manner under State aid, (iii) points to regulatory developments regarding the completion of the Banking Union (resolution financing, EDIS and liquidation regime), (v) and comments on policy developments and publications of the SRB. The briefing also (iv) summarises two external papers on “stock taking of the SRB’s activities over the past years: what to improve and focus on”.

Taking stock of the Single Resolution Board

29-03-2019

The Single Resolution Board (SRB) has had a somewhat difficult start but has been able to learn and adapt, and has gained stature following its first bank resolution decisions in 2017-18. It must continue to build up its capabilities, even as the European Union’s banking union and its policy regime for unviable banks continue to develop. Specific areas identified for parliamentary scrutiny include the SRB’s authority to determine a bank as failing or likely to fail; its crisis preparedness beyond ...

The Single Resolution Board (SRB) has had a somewhat difficult start but has been able to learn and adapt, and has gained stature following its first bank resolution decisions in 2017-18. It must continue to build up its capabilities, even as the European Union’s banking union and its policy regime for unviable banks continue to develop. Specific areas identified for parliamentary scrutiny include the SRB’s authority to determine a bank as failing or likely to fail; its crisis preparedness beyond the ongoing process of resolution planning; and its governance and operational independence.

Awtur estern

N.Veron, Bruegel

Country Specific Recommendations for 2017 and 2018 - A tabular comparison and an overview of implementation

20-03-2019

This study presents the 2017 Country-Specific Recommendations generally endorsed by the European Council of 22/23 June 2017 and adopted by the Council of 11 July 2017; the assessment of the implementation of 2017 Country-Specific Recommendations based on the Commission Country Reports published on 7 March 2018; the 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 23 May 2018 and adopted by the Council on 13 July 2018; the European Commission’s assessments of the implementation ...

This study presents the 2017 Country-Specific Recommendations generally endorsed by the European Council of 22/23 June 2017 and adopted by the Council of 11 July 2017; the assessment of the implementation of 2017 Country-Specific Recommendations based on the Commission Country Reports published on 7 March 2018; the 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 23 May 2018 and adopted by the Council on 13 July 2018; the European Commission’s assessments of the implementation of the 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations based on its Country Reports published on 27 February 2019; the Council Recommendation on the economic policy of the euro area approved by the Council of 23 January 2018.

EU framework for FDI screening

06-02-2019

In 2017, the European Commission submitted a proposal for the creation of an EU enabling framework for the screening of foreign direct investment (FDI), with which it aimed to strike a balance between maintaining the EU's general openness to FDI inflows and ensuring that the EU's essential interests are not undermined. The Parliament and Council have reached agreement on the proposal, which is scheduled to be voted by Parliament at first reading during the February plenary session.

In 2017, the European Commission submitted a proposal for the creation of an EU enabling framework for the screening of foreign direct investment (FDI), with which it aimed to strike a balance between maintaining the EU's general openness to FDI inflows and ensuring that the EU's essential interests are not undermined. The Parliament and Council have reached agreement on the proposal, which is scheduled to be voted by Parliament at first reading during the February plenary session.

Guarantee Fund for External Actions

13-12-2018

The Guarantee Fund for External Actions (GFEA) backs loans and loan guarantees granted to non-EU countries, or to finance projects in non-EU countries. Its objectives are to help protect the EU budget against the risks associated with such loans. The main objective of the actions backed by the GFEA is to support the increase of growth and jobs, and to improve the business environment in developing countries by strengthening the involvement of the private sector. The GFEA also contributes to the European ...

The Guarantee Fund for External Actions (GFEA) backs loans and loan guarantees granted to non-EU countries, or to finance projects in non-EU countries. Its objectives are to help protect the EU budget against the risks associated with such loans. The main objective of the actions backed by the GFEA is to support the increase of growth and jobs, and to improve the business environment in developing countries by strengthening the involvement of the private sector. The GFEA also contributes to the European External Investment Plan, which addresses the root causes of migration, the ongoing refugee crisis and security-related issues.

Implementing measures under the Benchmarks Regulation

11-07-2018

This briefing focuses on the implementing measures under Regulation (EU) No 2016/1011 on indices used as benchmarks in financial instruments and financial contracts or to measure the performance of investment funds (BMR). Items for discussion at the monthly scrutiny session could include the forthcoming Regulatory Technical Standards under BMR, including rules on input data and the authorisation/registration of an administrator, as well as other outstanding issues, such as Regulated Data Benchmarks ...

This briefing focuses on the implementing measures under Regulation (EU) No 2016/1011 on indices used as benchmarks in financial instruments and financial contracts or to measure the performance of investment funds (BMR). Items for discussion at the monthly scrutiny session could include the forthcoming Regulatory Technical Standards under BMR, including rules on input data and the authorisation/registration of an administrator, as well as other outstanding issues, such as Regulated Data Benchmarks.

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

06-07-2020
Geopolitical implications of the COVID-19 crisis - online hearing
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AFET
06-07-2020
Follow-up of OLAF case files, fighting fraud, corruption and other irregularities
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07-07-2020
STOA roundtable on deconfinement going digital: The rise of contact tracing apps
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STOA

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