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New technologies for Eastern Mediterranean offshore gas exploration

03-04-2019

The study examines the evolution of technologies in the offshore exploration and production of hydrocarbons in the Eastern Mediterranean, and their future environmental impact for the region. It finds that new technologies move this stage of natural gas development into increasing digitalisation, better designs for safety equipment, and increased automation. It then proceeds to propose a number of policy measures on collaboration, data sharing, environmental bassline surveys, open digital platforms ...

The study examines the evolution of technologies in the offshore exploration and production of hydrocarbons in the Eastern Mediterranean, and their future environmental impact for the region. It finds that new technologies move this stage of natural gas development into increasing digitalisation, better designs for safety equipment, and increased automation. It then proceeds to propose a number of policy measures on collaboration, data sharing, environmental bassline surveys, open digital platforms, as well as better monitoring for fugitive greenhouse gas emissions. All these will aid in improving the environmental credentials of offshore operations, but they must be accompanied by closer cooperation and collaboration amongst the countries that surround the East Med.

Awtur estern

DG, EPRS

It-trasport marittimu: regoli tat-traffiku u s-sikurezza

01-11-2017

F'dawn l-aħħar snin, diversi direttivi u regolamenti tal-UE tejbu ferm l-istandards ta' sikurezza fit-trasport marittimu. Dan it-titjib huwa primarjament ir-riżultat tat-tliet pakketti leġiżlattivi li kienu ġew adottati wara n-nawfraġji tal-bastimenti Erika u Prestige.

F'dawn l-aħħar snin, diversi direttivi u regolamenti tal-UE tejbu ferm l-istandards ta' sikurezza fit-trasport marittimu. Dan it-titjib huwa primarjament ir-riżultat tat-tliet pakketti leġiżlattivi li kienu ġew adottati wara n-nawfraġji tal-bastimenti Erika u Prestige.

EU response to the Caribbean hurricanes

20-09-2017

The scenes of devastation caused by recent hurricanes in the Caribbean are a stark reminder of the destructive force of nature. As residents struggle to rebuild their lives following the passage of the latest storms, attention turns to the relief efforts. The EU can help through emergency humanitarian assistance and a variety of funding mechanisms, depending on the status of the territories concerned and their relationship with the EU.

The scenes of devastation caused by recent hurricanes in the Caribbean are a stark reminder of the destructive force of nature. As residents struggle to rebuild their lives following the passage of the latest storms, attention turns to the relief efforts. The EU can help through emergency humanitarian assistance and a variety of funding mechanisms, depending on the status of the territories concerned and their relationship with the EU.

Proceedings of the Workshop on Reforming Single Market for fertilising products

15-03-2017

The workshop organised by the Policy Department A for the IMCO Committee aimed at discussing the revision of the fertilisers’ regulation proposed by the European Commission and its possible implications for producers, farmers and other users. It allowed exchange of views on the new regulatory proposal. This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

The workshop organised by the Policy Department A for the IMCO Committee aimed at discussing the revision of the fertilisers’ regulation proposed by the European Commission and its possible implications for producers, farmers and other users. It allowed exchange of views on the new regulatory proposal. This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

Awtur estern

Piotr KWIATKOWSKI, Osnabrück University and Aneta WIEWIÓROWSKA-DOMAGALSKA, Osnabrück University

Food contact materials

27-09-2016

Food is considered to be one of the most important sources of human exposure to chemicals. The safety of materials coming into contact with food should therefore be carefully evaluated, as chemicals from these can migrate into food. The European Parliament’s Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) has drafted an own-initiative report highlighting the problems related to the implementation of the Food Contact Materials Regulation, and this is due to be debated during the ...

Food is considered to be one of the most important sources of human exposure to chemicals. The safety of materials coming into contact with food should therefore be carefully evaluated, as chemicals from these can migrate into food. The European Parliament’s Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) has drafted an own-initiative report highlighting the problems related to the implementation of the Food Contact Materials Regulation, and this is due to be debated during the October I plenary session.

Resilience in the EU's foreign and security policy

15-06-2016

The migratory pressure with which the European Union is struggling is yet more evidence that distance or the natural borders inherent in seas, mountains and deserts are of little significance when people are confronted with challenges like conflict, fragility or failure of governance. The scale of conflicts, natural hazards, water shortages and state collapse suggests that things will only get worse – unless a new policy paradigm is effectively implemented. Resilience – understood as the capacity ...

The migratory pressure with which the European Union is struggling is yet more evidence that distance or the natural borders inherent in seas, mountains and deserts are of little significance when people are confronted with challenges like conflict, fragility or failure of governance. The scale of conflicts, natural hazards, water shortages and state collapse suggests that things will only get worse – unless a new policy paradigm is effectively implemented. Resilience – understood as the capacity of different layers of society to withstand, to adapt to, and to recover quickly from stresses and shocks – has gradually emerged as an answer to the growing complexity of the international security environment. In the EU context, the concept of resilience combines different policy areas: humanitarian aid, development assistance, disaster-risk reduction, climate-change adaptation, conflict prevention and peacebuilding. As a relatively new addition to EU jargon, the aim of building societal resilience still needs to be translated into tangible, practicable measures. This briefing complements an earlier briefing, Risk and resilience in foreign policy, published in September 2015.

The Implementation of the Environmental Liability Directive: A Survey of the Assessment Process Carried Out by the Commission

06-06-2016

By letter dated 26 January 2016 the Legal Affairs Committee requested the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs to commission a research project looking into the way Directive 2004/35/CE of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 April 2004 on environmental liability with regard to the prevention and remedying of environmental damage (ELD) is applied in the Member States with a view to putting forward conclusions and recommendations for future policy steps.

By letter dated 26 January 2016 the Legal Affairs Committee requested the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs to commission a research project looking into the way Directive 2004/35/CE of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 April 2004 on environmental liability with regard to the prevention and remedying of environmental damage (ELD) is applied in the Member States with a view to putting forward conclusions and recommendations for future policy steps.

Chernobyl 30 years on: Environmental and health effects

22-04-2016

In the early hours of 26 April 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the explosions it triggered caused a major release of nuclear radioactive material into the atmosphere. Radionuclides were scattered in the vicinity of the plant and over much of Europe. The Chernobyl fallout had a major impact on both agricultural and natural ecosystems in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, as well as in many other European countries. Radionuclides were taken up by plants and later by animals. In ...

In the early hours of 26 April 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the explosions it triggered caused a major release of nuclear radioactive material into the atmosphere. Radionuclides were scattered in the vicinity of the plant and over much of Europe. The Chernobyl fallout had a major impact on both agricultural and natural ecosystems in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, as well as in many other European countries. Radionuclides were taken up by plants and later by animals. In some areas, they were subsequently found in milk, meat, forest food products, freshwater fish and wood. Environmental impacts vary according to location and ecosystem. Forests and fresh water bodies have been among the most affected ecosystems. The impacts on wildlife in the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant are disputed. The impacts on human health have been extensively studied, although experts are not unanimous in their views. Official assessments by United Nations agencies have been challenged. The major population groups exposed were clean-up workers, evacuees and residents of contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. There has been no clear evidence of any measurable increase in radiation-induced adverse health effects in other European countries. The immediate and short-term effects resulting from heavy fallout exposure include radiation sickness and cataracts. Late effects are thyroid cancer, especially in children and adolescents, and leukaemia among exposed workers. The accident has also had important psychosocial effects.

The precautionary principle: Definitions, applications and governance

09-12-2015

The precautionary principle enables decision-makers to adopt precautionary measures when scientific evidence about an environmental or human health hazard is uncertain and the stakes are high. It first emerged during the 1970s and has since been enshrined in a number of international treaties on the environment, in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and the national legislation of certain Member States. The precautionary principle divides opinions. To some, it is unscientific and ...

The precautionary principle enables decision-makers to adopt precautionary measures when scientific evidence about an environmental or human health hazard is uncertain and the stakes are high. It first emerged during the 1970s and has since been enshrined in a number of international treaties on the environment, in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and the national legislation of certain Member States. The precautionary principle divides opinions. To some, it is unscientific and an obstacle to progress. To others, it is an approach that protects human health and the environment. Different stakeholders, experts and jurisdictions apply different definitions of the principle, mainly depending on the degree of scientific uncertainty required for the authorities to take action. Although most experts agree that the precautionary principle does not call for specific measures (such as a ban or reversal of the burden of proof), opinions are divided on the method for determining when to apply precautionary measures. The application of the precautionary principle presents many opportunities as well as challenges. The precautionary principle is closely linked to governance. This has three aspects: risk governance (risk assessment, management and communication), science-policy interfaces and the link between precaution and innovation.

ISIL/Da'esh and 'non-conventional' weapons of terror

03-12-2015

The European Union and its Member States must prepare for the possibility of a chemical or biological attack on their territory by the self-styled 'Islamic State' in Iraq and the Levant (known variously as IS, ISIS or ISIL, and by the Arabic acronym 'Da'esh'). Since the beginning of October 2015, terrorist attacks in Ankara, the Sinai Peninsula, Beirut, Paris and Tunis, for which ISIL/Da'esh has claimed responsibility, have cost the lives of 500 people. Immediately following the latest attack in ...

The European Union and its Member States must prepare for the possibility of a chemical or biological attack on their territory by the self-styled 'Islamic State' in Iraq and the Levant (known variously as IS, ISIS or ISIL, and by the Arabic acronym 'Da'esh'). Since the beginning of October 2015, terrorist attacks in Ankara, the Sinai Peninsula, Beirut, Paris and Tunis, for which ISIL/Da'esh has claimed responsibility, have cost the lives of 500 people. Immediately following the latest attack in Paris, the jihadist terrorist group threatened further attacks in European cities. ISIL/Da'esh has vowed that future strikes will be more lethal and even more shocking. This has prompted experts to warn that the group may be planning to try to use internationally banned weapons of mass destruction in future attacks. On 19 November 2015, the French Prime Minister, Manuel Valls, raised the spectre of ISIL/Da'esh planning a chemical or biological attack. At present, European citizens are not seriously contemplating the possibility that extremist groups might use chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) materials during attacks in Europe. Under these circumstances, the impact of such an attack, should it occur, would be even more destabilising. European governments and EU institutions need to be on alert, and should consider publicly addressing the possibility of a terrorist attack using chemical, biological, radiological or even nuclear materials. The EU institutions have devoted considerable efforts to preventing a CBRN attack on European soil and preparing worst-case scenarios. However, some gaps remain, in particular with regard to information-sharing among Member States.

Avvenimenti fil-ġejjieni

03-06-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | One of Them: From Albert Square to Parliament Square
Avveniment ieħor -
EPRS
11-06-2020
CONT Public Hearing: Implementation of EU funds
Smigħ -
CONT
11-06-2020
STOA Roundtable on Digital Sovereign Identity
Sessjoni ta' ħidma -
STOA

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