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Resulta(a)t(en)

Woord(en)
Publicatietype
Beleidsterrein
Auteur
Datum

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Paolo Gentiloni - Economy

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

Plenary round-up – Strasbourg, April II 2019

18-04-2019

Highlights of the April II plenary session (the last of the current legislature) included debates on the conclusions of the April 2019 European Council meeting on the withdrawal of the UK from the European Union, and the final debate in the series on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of Latvia, Kisjanis Karins. Important debates also took place on the rule of law in Romania; failure to adopt an EU digital services tax; protecting the European elections against international cybersecurity ...

Highlights of the April II plenary session (the last of the current legislature) included debates on the conclusions of the April 2019 European Council meeting on the withdrawal of the UK from the European Union, and the final debate in the series on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of Latvia, Kisjanis Karins. Important debates also took place on the rule of law in Romania; failure to adopt an EU digital services tax; protecting the European elections against international cybersecurity threats; and on the possible extradition of Julian Assange. Members debated a number of external relations situations: in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe after cyclone Idai; in Libya; in Sudan; and US recognition of the Golan Heights as Israeli territory. The legislative proposals adopted included those on collective investment funds, banking reform, prudential requirements, covered bonds, CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles, and promoting clean, energy-efficient vehicles. Members voted on a number of legislative proposals (see below), including a partial agreement on the Horizon Europe programme.

How the EU budget is spent: European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI)

03-04-2019

Created after the start of the current multiannual financial framework (MFF), the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) aims to trigger additional investment worth €500 billion in crucial sectors of the EU's economy that suffer from market failures and sub-optimal investment situations. Another major objective is to improve access to finance for European companies, with a special focus on smaller businesses. The functioning of EFSI relies on a strategic partnership with the European Investment ...

Created after the start of the current multiannual financial framework (MFF), the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) aims to trigger additional investment worth €500 billion in crucial sectors of the EU's economy that suffer from market failures and sub-optimal investment situations. Another major objective is to improve access to finance for European companies, with a special focus on smaller businesses. The functioning of EFSI relies on a strategic partnership with the European Investment Bank Group, which can approve and finance investment operations with a higher-risk profile than its usual portfolio, thanks to the guarantee provided by the EU budget under EFSI. For the post-2020 period, the European Commission has proposed an InvestEU Fund that should build on EFSI's results.

How the EU budget is spent: European Fund for Sustainable Development

02-04-2019

The European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) is one of the EU financial instruments that promote a pro-active development aid policy. It is part of the complex European external investment plan to support investments primarily in the EU neighbourhood and Africa. The EFSD applies the same financial model as the European Fund for Strategic Investments. By 2020, it is expected to generate €44 billion in investments (based on an initial EU contribution of €4.1 billion) to help create jobs and ...

The European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD) is one of the EU financial instruments that promote a pro-active development aid policy. It is part of the complex European external investment plan to support investments primarily in the EU neighbourhood and Africa. The EFSD applies the same financial model as the European Fund for Strategic Investments. By 2020, it is expected to generate €44 billion in investments (based on an initial EU contribution of €4.1 billion) to help create jobs and economic opportunities, address the socio-economic causes of migration, and contribute to the achievement of the UN sustainable development goals.

EU investment protection after the ECJ Opinion on Singapore: Questions of competence and coherence

25-03-2019

Investment protection continues to be a controversial issue, as shown in particular during the negotiations on the EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). To address stakeholder concerns, the EU has moved from traditional investor-state dispute settlement arrangements towards introducing bilateral investment court systems in new agreements and pursuing the goal of establishing a permanent multilateral investment ...

Investment protection continues to be a controversial issue, as shown in particular during the negotiations on the EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). To address stakeholder concerns, the EU has moved from traditional investor-state dispute settlement arrangements towards introducing bilateral investment court systems in new agreements and pursuing the goal of establishing a permanent multilateral investment court. At the same time, the European Court of Justice defined the limits of the Union’s exclusive competence in its opinion of 16 May 2017 with regard to the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (FTA), which has led to the splitting of new FTAs into two parts, treating investment protection separately. Adding to the complex picture, a plethora of EU Member States’ bilateral investment treaties also remain in place. The workshop held by the Committee on International Trade took stock of existing EU investment protection provisions and analysed the options for a coherent and predictable dispute settlement system in line with the EU Treaties.

Externe auteur

Prof. Dr. Steffen HINDELANG, LL.M., Department of Law, University of Southern Denmark, and Dr. Jurgita BAUR, Germany; and Prof. Dr. Stephan SCHILL, LL.M., Amsterdam Center for International Law, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Integrated Territorial Investments as an Effective Tool of the Cohesion Policy

15-03-2019

This paper assesses Integrated Territorial Investments as an effective tool of Cohesion policy (CP). Based on a review of the experience of designing ITI strategies and implementation experience thus far in 2014-2020, it highlights the key factors facilitating or impeding effectiveness and sets out recommendations for the future.

This paper assesses Integrated Territorial Investments as an effective tool of Cohesion policy (CP). Based on a review of the experience of designing ITI strategies and implementation experience thus far in 2014-2020, it highlights the key factors facilitating or impeding effectiveness and sets out recommendations for the future.

Externe auteur

Martin Ferry

Research for REGI Committee – Gender Dimension of the EU Cohesion Policy

19-02-2019

The study analyses how the gender dimension and the principle of gender equality are taken into account in the EU Cohesion Policy 2014-2020. The aim is to provide inputs for the discussion on how to improve the promotion of gender equality and non-discrimination in the post-2020 programming period. In detail, the study considers how gender equality has been mainstreamed in ESF and ERDF in the programming, implementation, and monitoring phases with focus on eight selected country case studies. It ...

The study analyses how the gender dimension and the principle of gender equality are taken into account in the EU Cohesion Policy 2014-2020. The aim is to provide inputs for the discussion on how to improve the promotion of gender equality and non-discrimination in the post-2020 programming period. In detail, the study considers how gender equality has been mainstreamed in ESF and ERDF in the programming, implementation, and monitoring phases with focus on eight selected country case studies. It also provides an assessment of the present and future challenges together with policy indications from relevant stakeholders at both European and national level.

Externe auteur

Istituto per la Ricerca Sociale: Manuela SAMEK LODOVICI (Project manager), Serena Marianna DRUFUCA, Elena FERRARI, Monica PATRIZIO, Flavia PESCE, Eleonora De SILVIS, Cristina MOJA. CASE STUDIES: France: Chiara Crepaldi (Istituto per la Ricerca Sociale) Germany: Bernhard Boockmann (Institute for Applied Economic Research -IAW) Italy: Flavia Pesce (Istituto per la Ricerca Sociale) Ireland: Dorota Szelewa (University College Dublin) Poland: Malgorzata Druciarek and Izabela Przybysz (Institute of Public Affairs, Warsaw) Romania: Cristina Vasilescu (Istituto per la Ricerca Sociale) Spain: Ruben Carrandi Cortina (Istituto per la Ricerca Sociale) Sweden: Malin Hellström Samuelson (Oxford Research, Stockholm)

Research For REGI Committee - Territorial Needs and Ring-fencing Requirements: Experience with Implementation in ERDF and ESF

15-02-2019

The aim of this study is to assess the implementation of EU-level ring-fencing requirements during the period 2014 to 2020, including a minimum ESF as well the thematic concentration shares. Based on different information and data collection sources, the study finds that the requirements continue to be relevant. There is evidence that the ring-fencing played a key role in ensuring a higher concentration of funding on targeted social cohesion priorities. The study also highlights variations in implementation ...

The aim of this study is to assess the implementation of EU-level ring-fencing requirements during the period 2014 to 2020, including a minimum ESF as well the thematic concentration shares. Based on different information and data collection sources, the study finds that the requirements continue to be relevant. There is evidence that the ring-fencing played a key role in ensuring a higher concentration of funding on targeted social cohesion priorities. The study also highlights variations in implementation between programmes and thematic objectives, the need for more flexibility in the implementation of programmes, and the continuing need to foster synergies between ERDF and ESF.

Externe auteur

TECHNOPOLIS GROUP BELGIUM: Jacek WALENDOWSKI, Laura ROMAN, and Sebastian OTTE ; CARDIFF UNIVERSITY: Reviewed by Dr. Adrian HEALY

Establishing a European Investment Stabilisation Function

17-01-2019

The European Commission has proposed to establish a European Investment Stabilisation Function. The accompanying IA focusses on the expected positive effects of the proposal, rather than providing a balanced assessment of different policy options and all their relevant impacts. The mostly qualitative analysis is complemented by some quantifications that are, to the Commission’s own admission, based on uncertain assumptions. The caveats, methods and models of the IA could have been better explained ...

The European Commission has proposed to establish a European Investment Stabilisation Function. The accompanying IA focusses on the expected positive effects of the proposal, rather than providing a balanced assessment of different policy options and all their relevant impacts. The mostly qualitative analysis is complemented by some quantifications that are, to the Commission’s own admission, based on uncertain assumptions. The caveats, methods and models of the IA could have been better explained to increase its transparency. The selection of the preferred option seems to be based on political considerations.

European Investment Stabilisation Function (EISF)

10-01-2019

The idea behind the Commission's proposed European Investment Stabilisation Function is to use dedicated financial means from the EU budget to help Member States stabilise their economies in the event of a major asymmetric shock. The Commission would borrow on the financial markets and then lend to the country concerned, which would use the money to finance public investment. Once the crisis was over, the Member State would reimburse the debt. The Commission hopes the other Member States would agree ...

The idea behind the Commission's proposed European Investment Stabilisation Function is to use dedicated financial means from the EU budget to help Member States stabilise their economies in the event of a major asymmetric shock. The Commission would borrow on the financial markets and then lend to the country concerned, which would use the money to finance public investment. Once the crisis was over, the Member State would reimburse the debt. The Commission hopes the other Member States would agree to subsidise the interest payments incurred. The function would be limited to euro-area countries, but those that have entered the exchange rate mechanism II (ERM II) might also benefit. The lending would be quasi automatic once statistical data showed an exceptional and steep rise in unemployment. The dossier has met with considerable opposition at Council level.

Toekomstige activiteiten

03-06-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | One of Them: From Albert Square to Parliament Square
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS
11-06-2020
CONT Public Hearing: Implementation of EU funds
Hoorzitting -
CONT
11-06-2020
STOA Roundtable on Digital Sovereign Identity
Workshop -
STOA

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