117

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Recommendations on the economic policy of the euro area under the European Semester - January 2020

24-01-2020

This note looks at the recommendations on the economic policies of the euro area adopted by the Council in 2019, upon proposal of the Commission. Its scope is to assess their follow up, making use of proxies such as on how Eurogroup has integrated euro area recommendations concerns in their “thematic discussions” and its work programmes, as well as Commission’s assessment. It also looks at the Commission proposal for the 2020 euro area recommendation. In addition, the note provides an institutional ...

This note looks at the recommendations on the economic policies of the euro area adopted by the Council in 2019, upon proposal of the Commission. Its scope is to assess their follow up, making use of proxies such as on how Eurogroup has integrated euro area recommendations concerns in their “thematic discussions” and its work programmes, as well as Commission’s assessment. It also looks at the Commission proposal for the 2020 euro area recommendation. In addition, the note provides an institutional perspective of the euro area recommendations, in particular the process setting the 2019 euro area recommendations and the timeline for adoption of the 2020 euro area recommendation and includes broad comparisons to earlier recommendations, to illustrate how policy concerns have evolved over time. This note is regularly updated.

A decade on from the financial crisis: Key data

17-10-2019

The financial crisis began with the collapse of Lehman Brothers, starting a worldwide chain reaction. The EU economy contracted for five consecutive quarters, with growth returning only in the second half of 2009. Stimulatory and fiscal actions by national governments and the EU, and the Eurosystem's loose monetary policy, helped achieve recovery. It was short-lived, however, as in 2010 a sovereign debt crisis resulted from a loss of financial market confidence, with soaring public debt. Yields on ...

The financial crisis began with the collapse of Lehman Brothers, starting a worldwide chain reaction. The EU economy contracted for five consecutive quarters, with growth returning only in the second half of 2009. Stimulatory and fiscal actions by national governments and the EU, and the Eurosystem's loose monetary policy, helped achieve recovery. It was short-lived, however, as in 2010 a sovereign debt crisis resulted from a loss of financial market confidence, with soaring public debt. Yields on government bonds, particularly in the periphery countries, rose dramatically. Ad hoc rescue devices, such as the European Financial Stabilisation Mechanism, brought the situation under control, later supported by the pledge of European Central Bank President Mario Draghi to do 'whatever it takes' to save the euro. The acute phase of the crisis ended in 2014, followed by a period of extremely low inflation and weak growth. To boost inflation, facilitate bank lending and stimulate the economy, the Eurosystem relied increasingly on quantitative easing. While 2017 was the EU's best year since the crises, with economic performance returning to pre-crisis levels, recent data suggest that the momentum is weakening, both in and outside the EU.

A decade on from the crisis: Main responses and remaining challenges

17-10-2019

It has been a decade since the financial crisis erupted and changed the world in 2008. Few at the time guessed what would be its magnitude and long-term consequences. The interconnectedness of the economy and the financial sector facilitated the spread of the crisis from the United States to Europe. First, the EU faced the Great Recession in the 2008-2009 period and then, after a short recovery, several Member States succumbed to the sovereign debt crisis. The combined crises had catastrophic consequences ...

It has been a decade since the financial crisis erupted and changed the world in 2008. Few at the time guessed what would be its magnitude and long-term consequences. The interconnectedness of the economy and the financial sector facilitated the spread of the crisis from the United States to Europe. First, the EU faced the Great Recession in the 2008-2009 period and then, after a short recovery, several Member States succumbed to the sovereign debt crisis. The combined crises had catastrophic consequences for economic growth, investment, employment and the fiscal position of many Member States. The EU engaged in short-term 'fire-fighting' measures such as bailouts to save banks and help stressed sovereigns, while at the same time reforming the inadequate framework. While signs of moderate recovery showed in 2014, the risk of falling into deflation or secular stagnation remained high, and it was only in 2017 that the EU economy returned to a state similar to that of before the crisis. The signs in 2019 are not so promising however. Many efforts have been made to improve resilience in the EU and the euro area. These have included improving the stability of the financial sector, strengthening economic governance, creating a safety net for sovereigns in distress and carrying out structural reforms, particularly in the countries most affected. In addition, the European Central Bank (ECB) has taken unconventional policy measures. Nonetheless many argue that the pace of the reforms has slowed down considerably since 2013 when the economic situation began to improve. The legacy of the crisis is still present and many challenges persist. These include the absence of a clear and agreed vision for the future of economic and monetary union (EMU), perennial macroeconomic imbalances and high public deficits in a number of Member States, and the ongoing risk of a doom loop between sovereigns and the banking sector. Post crisis vulnerabilities also include rising inequalities, youth unemployment and high in-work poverty risk levels. See also our infographic, A decade on from the financial crisis: Key data, PE 640.145.

European Council conclusions:A rolling check-list of commitments to date

16-10-2019

The role of the European Council – to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' – has evolved rapidly over the last decade. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery on commitments made in the conclusions of ...

The role of the European Council – to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' – has evolved rapidly over the last decade. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery on commitments made in the conclusions of its meetings. This overview of European Council conclusions is the latest edition of the Rolling Check-List which has been published regularly by the European Council Oversight Unit since 2014. It is designed to review the degree of progress in achieving the goals that the European Council has set itself and to assist the Parliament in exercising its important oversight role in this field.

Country-specific recommendations: An overview (September 2019)

11-09-2019

This note provides an overview of the country-specific recommendations issued annually to EU Member States under the European Semester for economic policy coordination. It presents how these recommendations evolved over time (2012-2019), including from the legal base perspective. Finally, it shows how recommendations were implemented over the 2012-2018 European Semester cycles. The note is updated on a regular basis.

This note provides an overview of the country-specific recommendations issued annually to EU Member States under the European Semester for economic policy coordination. It presents how these recommendations evolved over time (2012-2019), including from the legal base perspective. Finally, it shows how recommendations were implemented over the 2012-2018 European Semester cycles. The note is updated on a regular basis.

Country-Specific Recommendations for 2018 and 2019 - A tabular comparison and an overview of implementation

02-09-2019

This document presents: • The 2019 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 5 June 2019 and adopted by the Council on 9 July 2019 and • The European Commission’s assessments of the implementation of the 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations based on its Country Reports published on 27 February 2019. • The 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 23 May 2018 and adopted by the Council on 13 July 2018. This study was provided by the ...

This document presents: • The 2019 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 5 June 2019 and adopted by the Council on 9 July 2019 and • The European Commission’s assessments of the implementation of the 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations based on its Country Reports published on 27 February 2019. • The 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 23 May 2018 and adopted by the Council on 13 July 2018. This study was provided by the Economic Governance Support Unit (EGOV).

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Economic policy

28-06-2019

In the European Union (EU), although economic policy falls within the remit of each Member State, there is, nevertheless, multilateral coordination of economic policies between individual countries. The global financial crisis and the European sovereign debt crisis put this framework severely to the test. Partly as a result, recovery in the EU was slower than recovery in the United States, and was not achieved equally by all Member States. Furthermore, it has to a large extent been based on accommodative ...

In the European Union (EU), although economic policy falls within the remit of each Member State, there is, nevertheless, multilateral coordination of economic policies between individual countries. The global financial crisis and the European sovereign debt crisis put this framework severely to the test. Partly as a result, recovery in the EU was slower than recovery in the United States, and was not achieved equally by all Member States. Furthermore, it has to a large extent been based on accommodative fiscal and monetary policies that only partly hide underlying signs of fiscal or financial fragility in some countries. To remedy this, the European institutions began a twofold process in 2011: initiatives were taken to strengthen the current framework for economic governance and banking supervision in the euro area while, in parallel, discussions began on possible ways to reduce the economic divergences between Member States, provide incentives for risk reduction and risk-sharing, render the governance process more transparent and ensure democratic accountability. In this latter area, several initiatives – that did not require changes to the EU Treaties – were taken between 2015 and 2017. In summer 2017, discussions on deepening the policy framework for economic and monetary union (EMU) intensified. This process, which was advocated in the Five Presidents' Report (the presidents of the main EU institutions) and should be completed by 2025, is now being considered at Member State level. The current state of play points towards two main policy preferences, dividing Member States into two groups: those that prioritise risk-sharing measures (such as France), and those that argue instead for further risk-reduction initiatives (for example, Germany). This lack of consensus has so far meant that the European Council has not been able to reach a breakthrough. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Euro Area Scrutiny: External expertise on economic governance issues during the 8th Parliamentary term

24-06-2019

This document provides the summaries of all external experts papers published during the 8th parliamentary term (2014-2019) by the Economic Governance Support Unit, aimed at supporting the scrutiny work on the functioning of the Euro Area, especially in view of the bi-annual Economic Dialogues with the President of the Eurogroup.

This document provides the summaries of all external experts papers published during the 8th parliamentary term (2014-2019) by the Economic Governance Support Unit, aimed at supporting the scrutiny work on the functioning of the Euro Area, especially in view of the bi-annual Economic Dialogues with the President of the Eurogroup.

Diensten van de beleidsondersteunende afdelingen (ECON in Focus)

14-06-2019

Beleidsafdeling A levert hoogwaardige expertise, actuele analyse en onafhankelijk onderzoek aan de commissies die zij ondersteunt: ECON, EMPL, ENVI, ITRE en IMCO. Deze brochure is toegespitst op de diensten van de beleidsondersteunende afdeling voor de commissie ECON.

Beleidsafdeling A levert hoogwaardige expertise, actuele analyse en onafhankelijk onderzoek aan de commissies die zij ondersteunt: ECON, EMPL, ENVI, ITRE en IMCO. Deze brochure is toegespitst op de diensten van de beleidsondersteunende afdeling voor de commissie ECON.

The Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure – Overview

14-05-2019

The Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure (MIP) is a policy tool introduced within the reinforced economic governance framework adopted in 2011. The MIP aims at preventing and correcting macroeconomic imbalances in Member States, with specific attention to imbalances with potential spillovers effects on other Member States.

The Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure (MIP) is a policy tool introduced within the reinforced economic governance framework adopted in 2011. The MIP aims at preventing and correcting macroeconomic imbalances in Member States, with specific attention to imbalances with potential spillovers effects on other Member States.

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