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Revision of the visa code

27-04-2018

Although an increasing number of people have been travelling to the EU for tourism and business in recent years, visa application procedures are still costly and cumbersome. With the recast proposal on the visa code, the Commission aims to facilitate tourism, trade and business, whilst strengthening security and mitigating irregular migration. The impact assessment accompanying the proposal provides an overall convincing analysis tackling the problems of (1) insufficient finances to support visa ...

Although an increasing number of people have been travelling to the EU for tourism and business in recent years, visa application procedures are still costly and cumbersome. With the recast proposal on the visa code, the Commission aims to facilitate tourism, trade and business, whilst strengthening security and mitigating irregular migration. The impact assessment accompanying the proposal provides an overall convincing analysis tackling the problems of (1) insufficient finances to support visa processing; and (2) Member States' diverging practices when issuing multiple-entry visas. The Commission, however, also proposed (3) to address the lack of cooperation of some third countries in readmission matters in the visa code. One would have expected a more thorough analysis on this last aspect considering that there is no hard evidence on how visa leverage can translate into better cooperation with third countries on readmission. The Commission made efforts to consult with stakeholders and provide data, yet, the IA displays a general lack of data, statistics and evidence.

Revision of the visa code

06-03-2018

The EU common visa code (the Visa Code) was adopted in 2009 by means of Regulation 810/2009. It establishes the procedures and conditions for issuing short-stay visas for entry into and transit through the Schengen area. This type of visa is valid for up to three months, whereas long-term visas (or residence permits) remain subject to national procedures. Regulation 767/2008 on the Visa Information System (VIS) defines the purpose and functionalities of the VIS, the computerised system aimed at facilitating ...

The EU common visa code (the Visa Code) was adopted in 2009 by means of Regulation 810/2009. It establishes the procedures and conditions for issuing short-stay visas for entry into and transit through the Schengen area. This type of visa is valid for up to three months, whereas long-term visas (or residence permits) remain subject to national procedures. Regulation 767/2008 on the Visa Information System (VIS) defines the purpose and functionalities of the VIS, the computerised system aimed at facilitating the exchange of data between EU Member States and associated countries applying the common visa policy. Since its adoption, EU policy as regards short-term visas has faced a significant challenge: the delicate equilibrium between the need to promote economic growth via mobility and tourism, on the one hand, and the need to ensure the security of the Schengen area, on the other. Assessments of the implementation of the Visa Code and the VIS have shown that the requirements for obtaining a Schengen visa have had a negative impact on tourism and as a result, on EU economic growth. That said, the extent to which the provisions of the Visa Code have contributed to preserving the security of the external borders is difficult to evaluate, since the full deployment of the VIS (both at consular posts worldwide and at Schengen border crossing points) was completed relatively recently (2016). In its work programme for 2018, the European Commission announced that proposals will be tabled to revise the Visa Code and upgrade the VIS. The revision of the Visa Code, in particular, will aim at overcoming divisions triggered by the visa package submitted by the Commission in 2014. Thus far, the co-legislators have not reached an agreement on this set of measures. On the other hand, efforts to upgrade the VIS will be aimed at enhancing visa processing further, among other things through improving law enforcement authorities' access to the VIS, including new categories of data in the system, and ensuring the interoperability of the VIS with the other existing large-scale IT systems in the area of freedom, security and justice.

European information systems in the area of justice and home affairs: An overview

11-05-2017

The interconnections between border management, migration and internal security have become more apparent recently in the context of high inflows of refugees and irregular migrants and of increasing terrorist activities in the EU. To address these challenges, the EU has taken steps to revise and develop the European information systems in order to improve the collection, processing and sharing of data among Member States and relevant EU agencies. This publication provides an overview of the existing ...

The interconnections between border management, migration and internal security have become more apparent recently in the context of high inflows of refugees and irregular migrants and of increasing terrorist activities in the EU. To address these challenges, the EU has taken steps to revise and develop the European information systems in order to improve the collection, processing and sharing of data among Member States and relevant EU agencies. This publication provides an overview of the existing and proposed European information systems in the area of justice and home affairs. It discusses the legal basis, the purposes, the scope of data and access, the utilisation and the proposed changes for each information system, including issues of interoperability.

Consolidation and simplification of three Directives in the area of information and consultation of workers: Implementation Appraisal

19-06-2015

This Implementation Appraisal concentrates on three Directives in the area of information and consultation of workers subject to simplification and/or consolidation according to the CWP 2015: 1) Directive 98/59 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to collective redundancies; 2) Directive 2001/23 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of transfers of undertakings, businesses or parts of undertakings ...

This Implementation Appraisal concentrates on three Directives in the area of information and consultation of workers subject to simplification and/or consolidation according to the CWP 2015: 1) Directive 98/59 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to collective redundancies; 2) Directive 2001/23 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of transfers of undertakings, businesses or parts of undertakings or businesses and; 3) Directive 2002/14 establishing a general framework for informing and consulting employees in the European Community (the Directives). This briefing is one of a series of 'Implementation Appraisals', produced by the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), on the operation of existing EU legislation in practice. Each such briefing focuses on a specific EU law which is, or will shortly be, subject to an amending proposal from the European Commission, intended to update the current text. 'Implementation Appraisals' aim to provide a succinct overview of material publicly available on the implementation, application and effectiveness of an EU law to date - drawing on available inputs from, inter alia, the EU institutions and advisory committees, national parliaments, and relevant external consultation and outreach exercises.

What Form of Constitution for the EU?

01-12-1999

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