100

wynik(i)

Słowo/słowa
Rodzaj publikacji
Obszar polityki
Autor
Data

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Energy supply and security

28-06-2019

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy ...

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy sources to decarbonise the economy and meet the Paris Agreement goals. The 2014-2019 legislature saw numerous initiatives in connection with security of supply. The EU institutions reached agreement on a revised regulation on security of gas supply, a revised regulation on security of electricity supply, a revised decision on intergovernmental agreements in the energy field, a targeted revision of the gas directive to apply its key provisions to pipelines with third countries, and also new targets for energy efficiency and renewables by 2030. Parliament also adopted several own-initiative resolutions in the energy field, including one on the new EU strategy on liquefied natural gas and gas storage, which is key to gas supply security. Meanwhile, EU projects of common interest (PCIs) finance energy infrastructure that improves interconnection and supports security of supply. There is growing expectation among EU citizens that the EU will step up its involvement in energy supply and security. Whereas this view was shared by just over half of EU citizens in 2016 (52 %), it is now expressed by roughly two thirds (65 %). The EU will retain a key role in monitoring security of supply throughout the energy transition from the old system of centralised generation dominated by fossil fuels in national markets, towards a new system characterised by a high share of renewables, more localised production and cross-border markets. However, the EU would need to use a special legislative procedure if it wanted to intervene directly in determining the energy supply of its Member States. This procedure requires decision-making by unanimity in Council and only a consultative role for the Parliament. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Industrial policy

28-06-2019

Through its industrial policy, the European Union (EU) has been striving to create conditions conducive to increasing industry growth and competitiveness since 1992. European industry remains a cornerstone of the economy, providing one job out of five, and is responsible for the bulk of EU exports and investment in research and innovation. Today, the aim of EU policy is to enable a successful transition towards digital, knowledge-based, decarbonised and more circular industry in Europe. To achieve ...

Through its industrial policy, the European Union (EU) has been striving to create conditions conducive to increasing industry growth and competitiveness since 1992. European industry remains a cornerstone of the economy, providing one job out of five, and is responsible for the bulk of EU exports and investment in research and innovation. Today, the aim of EU policy is to enable a successful transition towards digital, knowledge-based, decarbonised and more circular industry in Europe. To achieve this goal, the EU supports, coordinates and supplements Member State-level policies and actions, mainly in the areas of research and innovation, SMEs and digital technologies. In a Eurobarometer poll conducted for the European Parliament, more than half of EU citizens expressed support for increased EU action on industrial policy. Despite this, it is still the least understood policy area covered by the poll. Since 2014, efforts have been made in a number of areas, including investment (mainly through the European Fund for Strategic Investment, which supports industrial modernisation); digitalisation (for example setting up a number of research partnerships, or a growing network of digital innovation hubs); financing (making it easier for industry and SMEs to access public markets and attract venture funds); greener industry (for example through the revised 2030 emission targets, or measures on clean mobility); standardisation (bringing together relevant stakeholders to collectively develop and update European standards); and skills (mobilising key stakeholders to close the skills gap and providing an adequate workforce for modern industry). The European Parliament has called for ambitious policies in many of these areas. In the future, EU spending on key areas relevant to industrial policy is expected to rise moderately. The European Commission is proposing to boost the share of EU spending on research, SMEs and key infrastructure, although not as much as Parliament has requested. In the coming years, policies are likely to focus on seeking fairer global competition, stimulating innovation, building digital capacities and increasing the sustainability of European industry. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Horizon Europe: Framework programme for research and innovation 2021–2027

15-05-2019

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the European Innovation Council, missions to promote research results, and new forms of partnerships. Horizon Europe also aims at reducing administrative burdens and promoting the concept of open science. More operational synergies are expected through better linkage with other EU programmes, such as cohesion policy (e.g. the European Social Fund), the new Digital Europe programme, and the new European Defence Fund. In March 2019, after several trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement. This agreement covers the content, but not, among other things, the budgetary issues, which will be discussed following the negotiations on the EU’s 2021-2027 long-term budget. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Horizon Europe – Specific programme: Implementing the framework programme

15-05-2019

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the European Innovation Council, missions to promote research results, and new forms of partnerships. While the proposal for the framework programme sets out the general and specific objective of Horizon Europe as well as the structure and the broad lines of the activities to be carried out, the specific programme aims to define the operational objectives and activities, especially for missions, the European Research Council, the European Innovation Council, work programmes, and the committee procedure. In April 2019, after several trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement, covering the specific programme’s content. It does not however address budgetary issues, pending negotiations on the EU’s overall 2021-2027 long-term budget. Parliament thus adopted its first-reading position on 17 April 2019, and it is expected that further trilogue negotiations will take place in the new term.

The Horizon Europe framework programme for research and innovation 2021-2027

22-11-2018

Within the context of the multiannual financial framework the Commission is proposing Horizon Europe as the framework programme for research and innovation to succeed Horizon 2020. This initial appraisal of the Commission’s impact assessment on the proposal acknowledges the necessity for impact assessments in relation to financial framework programmes to have a simplified format and scope differing from standard impact assessments and that the document in question sets out the rationale for the new ...

Within the context of the multiannual financial framework the Commission is proposing Horizon Europe as the framework programme for research and innovation to succeed Horizon 2020. This initial appraisal of the Commission’s impact assessment on the proposal acknowledges the necessity for impact assessments in relation to financial framework programmes to have a simplified format and scope differing from standard impact assessments and that the document in question sets out the rationale for the new programme and explains the choices made in its design rather effectively. It however questions the extent of the departure from the standard methodology and format of impact assessments set in the Commission’s better regulation guidelines.

Research and innovation in the EU: Evolution, achievements, challenges

21-11-2018

Research and innovation have become indispensable elements in many areas of our daily lives, including health and wellbeing (e.g. radiotherapy, vaccinations), the search for a sustainable environment (e.g. weather forecasts, solar energy), safety and security (e.g. tsunami alerts, biometric border control) and end-user products (e.g. smart phones, e-cars). Despite the correlation between research, development, innovation and competitiveness, when it comes to international comparisons, most Member ...

Research and innovation have become indispensable elements in many areas of our daily lives, including health and wellbeing (e.g. radiotherapy, vaccinations), the search for a sustainable environment (e.g. weather forecasts, solar energy), safety and security (e.g. tsunami alerts, biometric border control) and end-user products (e.g. smart phones, e-cars). Despite the correlation between research, development, innovation and competitiveness, when it comes to international comparisons, most Member States lag behind the 'Barcelona target' to invest 3 % of national gross domestic product (GDP) in scientific research and innovation. Better coordination of transnational research activities and the completion of the European Research Area (ERA) could benefit the EU economy by an extra €16 billion per year. The instruments, governance and scope of the framework programmes (FP) for research have changed dramatically over time. These changes include the development of public-public and public-private partnerships, the establishment of the European Research Council (ERC) and the European Institute for Innovation and Technology (EIT), and the introduction of specific instruments for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as individual mobility grants. To date, the current FP, Horizon 2020, has supported over 18 000 projects with more than €31 billion in funding. Nevertheless, Horizon 2020 has shortcomings, including complex procedures, a high administrative burden, a lack of flexibility when it comes to reacting to unforeseen circumstances, and insufficient synergies with other EU funds and public interventions and/or private finance.

The Implementation of Enhanced Cooperation in the EU

01-10-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Constitutional Affairs, examines – against a historical backdrop – the legal provisions governing Enhanced Cooperation as well as the so far very limited number of implemented Enhanced Cooperation initiatives. Based on these insights, concrete ideas are formulated on how to optimise this ‘standardised and generalised framework’ of differentiated ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Constitutional Affairs, examines – against a historical backdrop – the legal provisions governing Enhanced Cooperation as well as the so far very limited number of implemented Enhanced Cooperation initiatives. Based on these insights, concrete ideas are formulated on how to optimise this ‘standardised and generalised framework’ of differentiated integration, touching upon questions of efficacy, efficiency and legitimacy.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang WESSELS, Centre for Turkey and European Union Studies (CETEUS), University of Cologne; Carsten GERARDS, Department of EU International Relations and Diplomacy Studies, College of Europe (Bruges)

Material use in the European Union: Towards a circular approach

11-09-2018

Global material use has tripled during the past four decades, in particular as a result of increasing living standards. The use of materials, which need to be extracted from our environment, can pose environmental challenges. It can also be threatened by resource scarcity and price volatility. This is particularly true for Europe, which is strongly dependent on imported materials. There are a number of ways to consider material use in the European Union (EU). The breakdown of material use by types ...

Global material use has tripled during the past four decades, in particular as a result of increasing living standards. The use of materials, which need to be extracted from our environment, can pose environmental challenges. It can also be threatened by resource scarcity and price volatility. This is particularly true for Europe, which is strongly dependent on imported materials. There are a number of ways to consider material use in the European Union (EU). The breakdown of material use by types of materials indicates that non-metallic minerals, which include sand and gravel, account for almost half of the materials used in the EU. Material flows provide an overall picture of how materials enter, are used and finally leave the economy. Some of these materials stay in stocks, which are growing year after year. However, the efficiency of material use, measured through resource productivity, has increased substantially since 2000, in part as a result of the economic crisis. Material use in the EU is steered by policies related to different areas such as energy, waste and industry. Relevant policy documents include the 2011 roadmap to a resource-efficient Europe, the 2013 seventh Environment Action Programme and the 2015 circular economy action plan. The EU supports these policies with funding. Funding channels include the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, which allocated about €635 million between 2014 and 2020 for research on raw-material-related challenges. The European structural and investment funds also support developing more efficient material use practices. The European Parliament has advocated making the use of harmonised indicators for resource efficiency legally binding in the Member States and setting targets for increasing resource efficiency. Parliament has also supported broadening the scope of eco-design requirements to gradually include all relevant resource-efficiency features in product-design requirements.

Brexit and ICT Policy - Workshop Proceedings

16-08-2018

This report summarises the presentations given and subsequent discussion at the “Brexit and ICT Policy” workshop which was held on 19 June 2018. A range of views on the potential impact of Brexit on research, innovation, and regulation of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) within the EU27 was presented, taking into account the different forms of Brexit that are possible. This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy ...

This report summarises the presentations given and subsequent discussion at the “Brexit and ICT Policy” workshop which was held on 19 June 2018. A range of views on the potential impact of Brexit on research, innovation, and regulation of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) within the EU27 was presented, taking into account the different forms of Brexit that are possible. This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

Autorzy zewnętrzni

J Scott MARCUS, Bruegel, Alexander ROTH, Bruegel and Gaurav SANDHAR, Bruegel

New technologies and regional policy:Towards the next cohesion policy framework

04-07-2018

This study aims at highlighting the importance of the territorial dimension and structures for economic growth at European level. It focuses on the role and potential of the existing cohesion policy funding in planning and implementing ICT infrastructures in the regions, and in accompanying the efforts to digitalise European economy and society. In the same context, the study also highlights the role and potential of cohesion policy funding in planning and implementing integrated science and technology ...

This study aims at highlighting the importance of the territorial dimension and structures for economic growth at European level. It focuses on the role and potential of the existing cohesion policy funding in planning and implementing ICT infrastructures in the regions, and in accompanying the efforts to digitalise European economy and society. In the same context, the study also highlights the role and potential of cohesion policy funding in planning and implementing integrated science and technology parks.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

Jan Annerstedt (Copenhagen Business School) We are grateful to Ramón Luis Valcárcel Siso, Vice-President of the European Parliament responsible for STOA, and to Constanze Krehl and Lambert Van Nistelrooij, Members of the European Parliament - REGI Committee, who supported this study, offering their valuable contribution during the workshop, providing inputs to this publication.

Planowane wydarzenia

11-12-2019
Take-aways from 2019 and outlook for 2020: What Think Tanks are Thinking
Inne wydarzenie -
EPRS

Partnerzy

Bądź na bieżąco

email update imageSystem powiadomień e­mail

System powiadomień mejlowych, który wysyła najnowsze informacje bezpośrednio na Twój adres poczty elektronicznej, umożliwia śledzenie działalności wszystkich osób oraz wydarzeń związanych z Parlamentem. Wiadomości te obejmują najnowsze informacje dotyczące posłów, usług informacyjnych czy Think Tank.

System ten dostępny jest z dowolnej strony w witrynie Parlamentu. Aby zamówić usługę i otrzymywać regularnie powiadomienia z Think Tank, wystarczy podać swój adres poczty elektronicznej, wybrać interesujący nas temat, wskazać częstotliwość, z jaką biuletyn ma być nadsyłany (codziennie, co tydzień, co miesiąc), oraz potwierdzić rejestrację poprzez kliknięcie linku, który zostanie przesłany na wskazany adres mejlowy.

RSS imageWiadomości RSS

Nie przegap żadnej informacji lub aktualizacji strony Parlamentu Europejskiego dzięki naszym kanałom RSS.

W celu skonfigurowania swojego kanału należy kliknąć poniższy link.