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Publicado em 03-07-2020

What if insects were on the menu in Europe?

03-07-2020

Insects, while commonly consumed elsewhere in the world, have long been off the menu in Europe – but they could soon be creeping their way onto our plates. Entomophagy, the practice of eating insects, is now gaining serious interest – is it set to take Europe by swarm?

Insects, while commonly consumed elsewhere in the world, have long been off the menu in Europe – but they could soon be creeping their way onto our plates. Entomophagy, the practice of eating insects, is now gaining serious interest – is it set to take Europe by swarm?

European economic recovery

03-07-2020

A more united Europe has the potential to deliver greater benefits for its citizens, more effectively and efficiently, by offering a level of strategic scale and depth that no individual Member State, or even group of Member States, can achieve on their own. In particular, the combination of Europe's single market and economic and monetary union, used to their full potential and complemented by progress in other policy areas, such as the Green Deal, could prove to be key assets for a strong European ...

A more united Europe has the potential to deliver greater benefits for its citizens, more effectively and efficiently, by offering a level of strategic scale and depth that no individual Member State, or even group of Member States, can achieve on their own. In particular, the combination of Europe's single market and economic and monetary union, used to their full potential and complemented by progress in other policy areas, such as the Green Deal, could prove to be key assets for a strong European recovery from the serious economic shock recently administered by the coronavirus pandemic. An intensive debate has therefore opened up about the potential benefits of moving towards a higher degree of risk-sharing and collective 'strategic autonomy' for the Union, based on stronger and deeper common policies at EU level. The recent European Commission proposal for a 'Next Generation EU' recovery plan is likely to prove an important staging-point in this process. In practice, the size of the recovery response, the policy areas chosen for deepening, the financing options available to support them, and the degree to which they are matched by a greater willingness of the Union to 'act as one' on the international stage, are all likely to be determining factors in the outcome. This paper analyses some of the issues arising specifically in the economic field in the aftermath of the coronavirus crisis and looks at a range of policy initiatives that could help build a broadly based and sustainable European economic recovery and a more resilient European Union.

Policy Departments' Monthly Highlights - July 2020

03-07-2020

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Just Transition Fund

03-07-2020

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50-55 % by 2030, and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. This will require a socio-economic transformation in regions relying on fossil fuels and carbon intensive industries. As part of the European Green Deal, on 14 January 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation to create the Just Transition Fund, aimed at supporting EU regions most affected by the transition to a low carbon economy. In the context of recovery from the coronavirus ...

The EU aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50-55 % by 2030, and achieve climate neutrality by 2050. This will require a socio-economic transformation in regions relying on fossil fuels and carbon intensive industries. As part of the European Green Deal, on 14 January 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation to create the Just Transition Fund, aimed at supporting EU regions most affected by the transition to a low carbon economy. In the context of recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, an amended proposal on the Just Transition Fund (JTF) was published on 28 May 2020, increasingly the previously proposed JTF budget from €7.5 to €40 billion (in 2018 prices, with €10 billion under the core EU budget and €30 billion from Next Generation EU). Funding will be available to all Member States, while focusing on regions with the biggest transition challenges. The proposed budget for the Just Transition Fund is to be complemented with resources from cohesion policy funds and national co financing. The Fund will be part of a Just Transition Mechanism, which also includes resources under InvestEU and a public-sector loan facility. Total funding mobilised under the mechanism is expected to reach at least €150 billion. In the European Parliament, the file has been entrusted to the Committee on Regional Development (REGI). The rapporteur's draft report was published on 23 March and presented on 12 May. The REGI committee is due to vote on the report on 6 July, with a view to fixing Parliament's position for trilogue negotiations.

Covid-19 Newsletter 2: Exit strategy

03-07-2020

As EU Member States embark on a cautious de-confinement path, the economy slides into recession and the question of the proportionality of public health-related measures and their economic consequences is increasingly present in the public debate. As long as a vaccine (or an effective treatment) for the Covid-19 disease is not found and deployed, post-Covid-19 societies will have to coexist with the virus, and find an equilibrium between the social constraints resulting from health protecting measures ...

As EU Member States embark on a cautious de-confinement path, the economy slides into recession and the question of the proportionality of public health-related measures and their economic consequences is increasingly present in the public debate. As long as a vaccine (or an effective treatment) for the Covid-19 disease is not found and deployed, post-Covid-19 societies will have to coexist with the virus, and find an equilibrium between the social constraints resulting from health protecting measures and the need to mitigate as much as possible a huge economic shock, which if not addressed adequately, could have unpredictable social and political consequences. The Covid-19 crisis has shown above all the importance of joint European action. Although public health is primarily the competence of the Member States, the European Parliament has called on the Commission and the Member States to act together and to rise to the challenge and ensure that the Union emerges stronger from this crisis. In particular, a differentiated but coordinated post-lockdown approach in the EU should be ensured, in order to avoid a resurgence of the virus. The present Covid-19 Newsletter focuses on the de-confinement strategies and EU measures to support the economic recovery. An update of ongoing Covid-19 related expertise work for the ECON, EMPL, ENVI, ITRE and IMCO committees is provided at the end of this document.

Publicado em 02-07-2020

Digital sovereignty for Europe

02-07-2020

There is growing concern that the citizens, businesses and Member States of the European Union (EU) are gradually losing control over their data, over their capacity for innovation, and over their ability to shape and enforce legislation in the digital environment. Against this background, support has been growing for a new policy approach designed to enhance Europe's strategic autonomy in the digital field. This would require the Union to update and adapt a number of its current legal, regulatory ...

There is growing concern that the citizens, businesses and Member States of the European Union (EU) are gradually losing control over their data, over their capacity for innovation, and over their ability to shape and enforce legislation in the digital environment. Against this background, support has been growing for a new policy approach designed to enhance Europe's strategic autonomy in the digital field. This would require the Union to update and adapt a number of its current legal, regulatory and financial instruments, and to promote more actively European values and principles in areas such as data protection, cybersecurity and ethically designed artificial intelligence (AI). This paper explains the context of the emerging quest for 'digital sovereignty', which the coronavirus pandemic now seems to have accelerated, and provides an overview of the measures currently being discussed and/or proposed to enhance European autonomy in the digital field.

Economic and monetary union

02-07-2020

Launched almost three decades ago, economic and monetary union (EMU) represents a very important step in the process of European economic integration. However, the recent sovereign debt crisis highlighted its incomplete design and some inherent instabilities. A series of measures were therefore taken to deepen EMU and thereby to increase its resilience. They can be grouped in three main categories: monetary measures, measures intended to complete the single market, and measures aimed at strengthening ...

Launched almost three decades ago, economic and monetary union (EMU) represents a very important step in the process of European economic integration. However, the recent sovereign debt crisis highlighted its incomplete design and some inherent instabilities. A series of measures were therefore taken to deepen EMU and thereby to increase its resilience. They can be grouped in three main categories: monetary measures, measures intended to complete the single market, and measures aimed at strengthening the economic union dimension of EMU. The current coronavirus pandemic has shown the urgency of many of them; recently submitted important proposals could lead to a noteworthy evolution in the architecture of EMU. This Briefing groups and highlights some of these proposals. The table at the end features a number of additional proposals in summary form.

Publicado em 01-07-2020

The German Parliament and EU affairs

01-07-2020

The Federal Republic of Germany has a parliamentary system consisting of the Bundestag and the Bundesrat, established in 1949. The Bundestag is the main legislative body, which determines all laws at federal level. It does so with the participation of a ‘second chamber’, the Bundesrat, which represents the 16 constituent states (Bundesländer). Competencies are shared between the Federation and the Länder, with the Länder having the right to legislate insofar as the Grundgesetz (Basic Law) does not ...

The Federal Republic of Germany has a parliamentary system consisting of the Bundestag and the Bundesrat, established in 1949. The Bundestag is the main legislative body, which determines all laws at federal level. It does so with the participation of a ‘second chamber’, the Bundesrat, which represents the 16 constituent states (Bundesländer). Competencies are shared between the Federation and the Länder, with the Länder having the right to legislate insofar as the Grundgesetz (Basic Law) does not confer legislative power on the Federation. Federal law takes precedence over Länder law. Areas of exclusive federal legislation, such as foreign policy, defence and trade, are governed at federal level. In areas of concurrent legislation, the Länder can adopt legislation as long as there is no existing federal legislation. Over time, federal legislation has been expanding. Only in some areas, for example in education, culture, police and administrative law, have the Länder retained their exclusive legislative powers. This briefing is part of an EPRS series on national parliaments and EU affairs. It aims to provide an overview of the way the national parliaments of EU Member States are structured and how they process, scrutinise and engage with EU legislation. It also provides information on relevant publications of the national parliaments.

Priority dossiers under the German EU Council Presidency

01-07-2020

Germany is a federal parliamentary republic, with federal power vested in the Bundestag (the German parliament) and the Bundesrat (the representatives of Germany's regional states, Länder). The Bundestag is the only body at the federal level directly elected by the people, and is currently composed of 709 members. The Bundestag is elected every four years by German citizens aged 18 and over. The current Bundestag is led by the CDU (Christian Democratic Union) with 33 % of representation, followed ...

Germany is a federal parliamentary republic, with federal power vested in the Bundestag (the German parliament) and the Bundesrat (the representatives of Germany's regional states, Länder). The Bundestag is the only body at the federal level directly elected by the people, and is currently composed of 709 members. The Bundestag is elected every four years by German citizens aged 18 and over. The current Bundestag is led by the CDU (Christian Democratic Union) with 33 % of representation, followed by the SPD (Social Democratic Party) with 24 % and then by the AFD (Alternative for Germany) with 11 %. These are followed by: the Free Democratic Party (FDP), the Left (Die Linke), Alliance 90/The Greens (Grüne) and the Christian Social Union (CSU). Chancellor Angela Merkel, who has been in office since 2005, heads the executive government. The executive is elected by the Bundestag and is responsible to it. The German head of state is the federal President, currently Frank-Walter Steinmeier. The federal President has a role in the political system, particularly in the establishment of a new government and its possible dissolution. Germany has held the Council Presidency 12 times since becoming a founding member of the European Economic Community in 1957. The country last held the Presidency in 2008. It will take the helm of the EU Council Presidency on 1 July 2020, starting the trio Presidency composed of Germany, Portugal and Slovenia. The Trio has adopted a Declaration outlining the main areas of focus for their Trio, including democracy, human rights and the rule of law, as well as an economically strong EU based on growth and jobs and the social dimension. Likewise the three Member States have pledged to work on the challenges of digitalisation, climate change and energy transition. It is to be noted that the Trio is working on a revised declaration to reflect the changed situation in Europe due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Strategic Agenda 2019-2024 endorsed by the Member States at the European Council meeting of 20 June 2019 will remain, however, a guiding instrument. The Agenda covers the protection of citizens' freedoms; developing a strong and vibrant economic base; building a climate-neutral, green, fair and social Europe; and promoting European interests and values on the global stage.

The economy and coronavirus: Weekly Picks 01/07/2020

01-07-2020

This paper provides a summary of recent analyses of the economic and financial effects of the coronavirus, an overview of the proposed new temporary European Union Recovery Instrument, and some policy recommendations made in the public domain to mitigate the negative economic effects of the pandemic.

This paper provides a summary of recent analyses of the economic and financial effects of the coronavirus, an overview of the proposed new temporary European Union Recovery Instrument, and some policy recommendations made in the public domain to mitigate the negative economic effects of the pandemic.

Futuros eventos

06-07-2020
Geopolitical implications of the COVID-19 crisis - online hearing
Audição -
AFET
06-07-2020
Follow-up of OLAF case files, fighting fraud, corruption and other irregularities
Audição -
CONT
07-07-2020
STOA roundtable on deconfinement going digital: The rise of contact tracing apps
Seminário -
STOA

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