34

Resultado(s)

Palavra(s)
Tipo de publicação
Domínio de intervenção
Autor
Palavra-chave
Data

Civil and military drones: Navigating a disruptive and dynamic technological ecosystem

08-10-2019

Often labelled as one of today's main disruptive technologies, drones have indeed earned this label by prompting a fundamental rethinking of business models, existing laws, safety and security standards, the future of transport, and modern warfare. The European Union (EU) recognises the opportunities that drones offer and sees them as opening a new chapter in the history of aerospace. The EU aviation strategy provides guidance for exploring new and emerging technologies, and encourages the integration ...

Often labelled as one of today's main disruptive technologies, drones have indeed earned this label by prompting a fundamental rethinking of business models, existing laws, safety and security standards, the future of transport, and modern warfare. The European Union (EU) recognises the opportunities that drones offer and sees them as opening a new chapter in the history of aerospace. The EU aviation strategy provides guidance for exploring new and emerging technologies, and encourages the integration of drones into business and society so as to maintain a competitive EU aviation industry. Ranging from insect-sized to several tonnes in weight, drones are extremely versatile and can perform a very large variety of functions, from filming to farming, and from medical aid to search and rescue operations. Among the advantages of civil and military drones are their relative low cost, reach, greater work productivity and capacity to reduce risk to human life. These features have led to their mass commercialisation and integration into military planning. Regulatory and oversight challenges remain, however, particularly regarding dual-use drones – civil drones that can be easily turned into armed drones or weaponised for criminal purposes. At EU level, the European Commission has been empowered to regulate civil drones and the European Aviation Safety Agency to assist with ensuring a harmonised regulatory framework for safe drone operations. The latest EU legislation has achieved the highest ever safety standards for drones. Another challenge remaining for regulators, officials and manufacturers alike is the need to build the trust of citizens and consumers. Given that drones have been in the public eye more often for their misuse than their accomplishments, transparency and effective communication are imperative to prepare citizens for the upcoming drone age.

EU certification of aviation security screening equipment

07-07-2019

In 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a certification system for aviation security screening equipment. The proposal sought ‘to contribute to the proper functioning of the EU internal market and to increase the global competitiveness of the EU industry by establishing an EU certification system for aviation security equipment’. This system was to be based on EU type-approval and issuance of a certificate of conformity by manufacturers, which would have ...

In 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a certification system for aviation security screening equipment. The proposal sought ‘to contribute to the proper functioning of the EU internal market and to increase the global competitiveness of the EU industry by establishing an EU certification system for aviation security equipment’. This system was to be based on EU type-approval and issuance of a certificate of conformity by manufacturers, which would have been valid in all Member States, according to the principle of mutual recognition. Progress on the proposal rapidly reached a stalemate. Consequently, in its 2019 work programme, the Commission announced its intention to withdraw the proposal, noting that there was a common understanding that an EU certification system would be better reached by amending existing implementing legislation based on Regulation (EC) No 300/2008 on common rules in the field of civil aviation security. The proposal was formally withdrawn on 21 June 2019. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Artificial Intelligence and civil law; liability rules for drones

13-12-2018

This study – commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee – analyses existing European and national legislation on the regulation of drones for civil use, discussing how they are defined and classified, whether certification and registration is required, how liability is apportioned between the subjects involved, and if compulsory insurance is provided for. Finally, on the basis of a risk-management ...

This study – commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee – analyses existing European and national legislation on the regulation of drones for civil use, discussing how they are defined and classified, whether certification and registration is required, how liability is apportioned between the subjects involved, and if compulsory insurance is provided for. Finally, on the basis of a risk-management approach, the study elaborates recommendations for future policy formulation.

Autor externo

Andrea Bertolini

New civil aviation safety rules

15-10-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules and the rules have been in force since 11 September 2018. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 620.199, 28 March 2018.

Plenary round-up – Strasbourg, June 2018

15-06-2018

The June plenary session highlights were the continuation of the debate on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Mark Rutte, and the preparation of the European Council meeting of 28 and 29 June 2018. The European Commission and Council participated in discussions on, inter alia, the independence of the judiciary in Poland, humanitarian emergencies in the Mediterranean and solidarity in the EU, and the economic and monetary union package. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statements ...

The June plenary session highlights were the continuation of the debate on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Mark Rutte, and the preparation of the European Council meeting of 28 and 29 June 2018. The European Commission and Council participated in discussions on, inter alia, the independence of the judiciary in Poland, humanitarian emergencies in the Mediterranean and solidarity in the EU, and the economic and monetary union package. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statements on the Iran nuclear deal, the annual report on human rights and democracy in the world (2017), and on the Georgian occupied territories ten years after the Russian invasion, were also discussed. Debates followed on the first anniversary of the signature of the Istanbul Convention and on the closure of the ivory market to combat poaching. Parliament approved the proposal to amend the regulation on OTC derivatives, an agreement on common rules in the field of civil aviation, on monitoring and reporting of CO2 emissions and on fuel consumption of heavy-duty vehicles. It approved the final text of a proposed directive on proportionality tests for new national professional regulations. It also approved the new composition of Parliament after 'Brexit', and further macro-financial assistance to Ukraine.

Common rules in the field of civil aviation

06-06-2018

As air traffic is growing and new technologies such as unmanned aircraft are appearing in the skies, the European Union has decided to adapt its civil aviation rules. In December 2015, the European Commission presented a proposal for a regulation on civil aviation safety and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), which would repeal the 2008 regulation on the same topic. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules. The provisional ...

As air traffic is growing and new technologies such as unmanned aircraft are appearing in the skies, the European Union has decided to adapt its civil aviation rules. In December 2015, the European Commission presented a proposal for a regulation on civil aviation safety and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), which would repeal the 2008 regulation on the same topic. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules. The provisional agreement is scheduled to be voted by Parliament at first reading during the June plenary session.

New civil aviation safety rules

28-03-2018

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules ...

Flying remains one of the safest forms of transport, and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. New technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to update aviation safety rules. Two years later, the European Parliament and the Council reached a provisional agreement on the new rules. The reform includes the first-ever EU rules for civil drones, extends the EASA's mandate and provides for using existing resources more efficiently. The provisional agreement now needs to be confirmed by Parliament in plenary. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 595.877, 12 January 2017.

New civil aviation safety rules

12-01-2017

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European ...

Despite some recent high-profile disasters, flying remains one of the safest forms of transport and the EU's accident rate is lower than in the rest of the world. However, it cannot automatically be assumed that such performance will continue, as global air traffic is forecast to double over the next 20 years. In addition, new technologies, such as unmanned aircraft (drones), are also appearing in European skies, which require adaption of the current regulatory framework. In December 2015, the European Commission proposed to replace the current Regulation on civil aviation safety and the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The new proposal would introduce risk- and performance-based rules, close some safety gaps and interlinks safety more closely with other domains such as security and the environment. It proposes to strengthen EASA's role and take several measures to use existing resources more efficiently (e.g. sharing aviation inspectors). It also introduces essential requirements for drones. In November 2016, the European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism generally backed the updated rules, in particular the idea of regulating drones at EU level. The report constitutes Parliament’s position for negotiations with the Council, which adopted its general approach for the negotiations with the Parliament on 1 December 2016. This updates an earlier edition, of January 2016: PE 573.933. "A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html"

Research for TRAN Committee - Airport Slots and Aircraft Size at EU Airports

15-06-2016

Congestion at major EU airports has led to a system of take-off and landings permits called ‘slots’. Airlines are allocated slots according to their previous use, through the ‘Grandfather Rights’ rule. This note shows that while this system impacts negatively on aircraft size, through phenomena known as ‘slot hoarding’ and ‘slot babysitting’, this impact is mitigated by the increase in traffic which brings about operation of larger aircraft.

Congestion at major EU airports has led to a system of take-off and landings permits called ‘slots’. Airlines are allocated slots according to their previous use, through the ‘Grandfather Rights’ rule. This note shows that while this system impacts negatively on aircraft size, through phenomena known as ‘slot hoarding’ and ‘slot babysitting’, this impact is mitigated by the increase in traffic which brings about operation of larger aircraft.

Autor externo

Nathalie Lenoir

The International Civil Aviation Organization

13-05-2016

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a specialised agency of the United Nations, established in 1944 to manage the administration and governance of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the Chicago Convention). Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Futuros eventos

29-10-2020
Workshop on Open spaces at EU institutions versus traditional work spaces
Seminário -
CONT
29-10-2020
Joint Hearing - Union Citizenship: Empowerment, Inclusion, Participation
Audição -
AFCO JURI LIBE PETI
29-10-2020
EPRS online policy roundtable - America’s moment of destiny? US Presidential election
Outro evento -
EPRS

Parceiros