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Implementation of Country Specific Recommendations under the MIP - July 2020

02-07-2020

This note provides an overview of the implementation rate of Country-Specific Recommendations (CSRs) issued under the Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure (see a separate EGOV note for details on the MIP procedure). Figures presented in this overview refer only to Member States experiencing macroeconomic imbalances and are based on the implementation assessments performed by the Commission in its annual Country Reports.

This note provides an overview of the implementation rate of Country-Specific Recommendations (CSRs) issued under the Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure (see a separate EGOV note for details on the MIP procedure). Figures presented in this overview refer only to Member States experiencing macroeconomic imbalances and are based on the implementation assessments performed by the Commission in its annual Country Reports.

Implementation of the Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure: State of play June 2020

30-06-2020

This note presents the EU Member States' situation with respect to the Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure, taking into account recent assessments and decisions by the European Commission and the Council. It also gives an overview of relevant comments on the MIP published by EU institutions. A separate EGOV note describes the MIP procedure. This document is regularly updated.

This note presents the EU Member States' situation with respect to the Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure, taking into account recent assessments and decisions by the European Commission and the Council. It also gives an overview of relevant comments on the MIP published by EU institutions. A separate EGOV note describes the MIP procedure. This document is regularly updated.

Key Macroeconomic Indicators for Cyprus, Greece, Ireland and Portugal

12-05-2020

This document provides a selection of key indicators in Member States that are or have been subject to a Macroeconomic Adjustment Programme. Greece is still under a programme, while Ireland, Portugal and Cyprus have exited their programmes and are now under so-called post-programme surveillance. For more information on the programmes, please see a separate document on Financial Assistance to EU Member States.

This document provides a selection of key indicators in Member States that are or have been subject to a Macroeconomic Adjustment Programme. Greece is still under a programme, while Ireland, Portugal and Cyprus have exited their programmes and are now under so-called post-programme surveillance. For more information on the programmes, please see a separate document on Financial Assistance to EU Member States.

Public finances in Euro Area Member States: selected indicators - May 2020

11-05-2020

This document presents selected indicators on public finance for the Euro Area Member States and the Euro Area as a whole. For each indicator, it gives a short explanation and the employed sources. A final section provides a summary on how the sustainability of public finances is assessed by the European and other international institutions.

This document presents selected indicators on public finance for the Euro Area Member States and the Euro Area as a whole. For each indicator, it gives a short explanation and the employed sources. A final section provides a summary on how the sustainability of public finances is assessed by the European and other international institutions.

European business statistics

15-01-2020

In the context of the work of reviewing the fitness of current regulations (REFIT), the Commission has decided to amend Regulation (EC) No 184/2005 and repeal 10 legal acts in the field of business statistics. The aim is to reduce the administrative burden for businesses, especially SMEs, and to put an end to legal fragmentation in the field of European business statistics. The Commission is proposing to establish a common legal framework for the development, production and dissemination of European ...

In the context of the work of reviewing the fitness of current regulations (REFIT), the Commission has decided to amend Regulation (EC) No 184/2005 and repeal 10 legal acts in the field of business statistics. The aim is to reduce the administrative burden for businesses, especially SMEs, and to put an end to legal fragmentation in the field of European business statistics. The Commission is proposing to establish a common legal framework for the development, production and dissemination of European statistics related to business structure, economic activities and performance, as well as on international transactions and research and development activities in the EU economy; and for the European network of national statistical business registers and the EuroGroups Register. The regulation includes provisions covering business registers, the data sources to be used, and the exchange of confidential data for the purpose of intra-Union trade in goods statistics. The final act was signed on 27 November 2019 and published in the Official Journal on 17 December 2019. It will apply from 1 January 2021, with the exception of certain articles, which will apply from 1 January 2022. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Snapshot of the EU regions with a view to selected Europe 2020 targets

03-10-2019

In 2014-2020, €461 billion from the EU budget is allocated to EU regions for investments in support of the strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth (Europe 2020). The NUTS 2 classification (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) divides EU territory into 281 regions with population thresholds between 800 000 and 3 000 000. It is used for the purpose of collection and harmonisation of statistics and for socio-economic analysis. Furthermore, it is used for allocating European ...

In 2014-2020, €461 billion from the EU budget is allocated to EU regions for investments in support of the strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth (Europe 2020). The NUTS 2 classification (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) divides EU territory into 281 regions with population thresholds between 800 000 and 3 000 000. It is used for the purpose of collection and harmonisation of statistics and for socio-economic analysis. Furthermore, it is used for allocating European structural and investment funds (ESIF) to EU regions. This paper provides statistics for the NUTS 2 regions with a focus on selected Europe 2020 targets, firstly looking at GDP and unemployment for the years 2007 and 2017/18. It shows the employment situation of the younger generation in 2018. It then considers employment, poverty and education in the light of selected Europe 2020 targets, and internet usage in view of the EU’s digital agenda. Finally, it shows the ESIF allocation for the 2014-2020 period and EU payments up to June 2019.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Promoting European culture

28-06-2019

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural ...

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural identity and expression. From the economic point of view, the cultural and creative sector, which employs 8.4 million people in the European Union, is dynamic and has a large potential for growth due to its diversity and scope for individual creative freedom. Yet the development of this potential is hampered by barriers, notably linguistic diversity, fragmentation and different financial mechanisms across the EU. The EU's cultural and creative industry also faces challenge from digital technologies and global competition, particularly from the United States' (US) audiovisual industry, and from US and Chinese diplomatic efforts to promote their cultural output. Under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the EU's role in the context of cultural policy is a supportive and complementary one, direct responsibility in the area being largely a matter for the individual Member States. Nevertheless, since 2014, these challenges have been addressed at the EU level, inter alia via the strengthening of the digital single market, which is essential for access to culture, the circulation of European cultural works, the fair remuneration of creators and fair competition. Since the economic crisis, additional funding has also been made available for the sector via the European Fund for Strategic Investment introduced by the Juncker Commission in 2015. As indicated in a 2017 European Commission communication on the role of culture and education, the synergies between the socio-economic aspects are to be enhanced. The European Year of Cultural Heritage in 2018 is to feed into a reflection and actions related to shared culture and history. These issues are addressed in the New European Agenda for Culture, while the new multiannual financial framework for 2021-2027 envisages increased funding for culture. This will also support efforts to combine artistic and technological skills, which are a prerequisite for artistic expression in the new digital environment. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: The fight against unemployment

28-06-2019

By promoting a high level of employment, the European Union (EU) has been involved in the fight against unemployment since as long ago as the early 1950s. The issue was brought to the top of the European agenda with the onset of the 2008 economic and financial crisis, and the consequent rise in unemployment rates in all European Union (EU) Member States. In its Europe 2020 strategy, the European Commission set a target to get 75 % of 20 to 64 year-olds into employment by 2020. EU labour market conditions ...

By promoting a high level of employment, the European Union (EU) has been involved in the fight against unemployment since as long ago as the early 1950s. The issue was brought to the top of the European agenda with the onset of the 2008 economic and financial crisis, and the consequent rise in unemployment rates in all European Union (EU) Member States. In its Europe 2020 strategy, the European Commission set a target to get 75 % of 20 to 64 year-olds into employment by 2020. EU labour market conditions have significantly improved in recent years, and most labour market indicators have strengthened steadily. Since mid-2013, the unemployment rate has continued to decline, and the EU is back to its pre-crisis level (6.5 % in February 2019). Despite the recovery in economic growth and its positive impact on the labour market, the EU still has to face unemployment challenges, particularly concerning differences between Member States, youth unemployment and long-term unemployment. Since 2014, efforts have been made in a number of areas, including to help young people enter the labour market, to combat long-term unemployment, upgrade skills, and facilitate workers' mobility in the European Union. The improvement in labour market indicators has been reflected in citizens' improved evaluation of the EU's involvement in the fight against unemployment, but there is still a very high demand for even more EU intervention in this policy area (76 % of EU citizens). In the future, new or updated legislation relating to employment could modernise work to help in adjustment to a digital world, support sustainable transitions from unemployment into employment and between jobs, increase labour mobility and create closer coordination between economic and social policies. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Demographic outlook for the European Union 2019

03-06-2019

This paper is the second in a series that EPRS is producing on the demographic outlook for the European Union (EU). Demography matters. The economy, labour market, healthcare, pensions, the environment, intergenerational fairness and election results – they are all driven by demography. The EU has seen its population grow substantially – by around a quarter since 1960 – and currently stands at over 500 million people. However, it is now beginning to stagnate, before its expected decline from around ...

This paper is the second in a series that EPRS is producing on the demographic outlook for the European Union (EU). Demography matters. The economy, labour market, healthcare, pensions, the environment, intergenerational fairness and election results – they are all driven by demography. The EU has seen its population grow substantially – by around a quarter since 1960 – and currently stands at over 500 million people. However, it is now beginning to stagnate, before its expected decline from around the middle of the century. With the world population having risen still more substantially and growth continuing, the EU represents a shrinking proportion of this population. The EU population is also ageing dramatically, as life expectancy increases and fertility rates fall below their levels in the past. This has serious implications across a range of areas including the economy, healthcare and pensions. Free movement within the EU and migration from third countries also play an important role in shaping demography in individual Member States and regions. The 'in-focus' section of this year's edition looks at pensions. It highlights that, whilst national reforms have largely successfully addressed issues around the sustainability of pension systems, concerns about the adequacy of pensions, particularly in the future, still remain.

Expected Unemployment Rate for 2019 in EU Member States

28-05-2019

The map below shows the 2019 expected unemployment rate based on the European Commission’s spring 2019 forecast; the data will be updated on regular basis once new forecasts will be available.

The map below shows the 2019 expected unemployment rate based on the European Commission’s spring 2019 forecast; the data will be updated on regular basis once new forecasts will be available.

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