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India: environmental issues

10-04-2019

The entire south Asian region is threatened by climate change. Changes in average weather conditions are likely to create hotspots across the region and have negative impacts on living standards and gross domestic product (GDP). India is at the core of this trend: it ranks 14th in the last United Nations global climate risk index and in 2017 it was the second most-affected country in terms of casualties related to extreme weather. Air quality in Indian cities is quickly deteriorating and it is today ...

The entire south Asian region is threatened by climate change. Changes in average weather conditions are likely to create hotspots across the region and have negative impacts on living standards and gross domestic product (GDP). India is at the core of this trend: it ranks 14th in the last United Nations global climate risk index and in 2017 it was the second most-affected country in terms of casualties related to extreme weather. Air quality in Indian cities is quickly deteriorating and it is today worse than the situation in China: in the 2018 World Health Organization (WHO) global ambient air quality database, 11 of the 12 cities with the highest levels of small particulate – PM2.5 – are located in India. Air pollution goes hand in hand with poverty: in 2016 an estimated 790 million people (almost 60 % of the Indian population), still relied on biomass for cooking. Deforestation, water pollution, clean water shortages, and waste management are further issues of concern. The Indian authorities have taken several initiatives to tackle these issues. In 2008, the first national plan on climate change (NAPCC) outlined eight 'national missions' running up to 2017. India is a leader in the implementation of the Paris Agreement on climate change. It is a founding member of the International Solar Alliance and has ambitious targets in terms of solar power energy. It has launched a national clean air programme (NCAP) to combat air pollution. Prime Minister's Narendra Modi government has launched several flagship initiatives on environment, including a clean cooking scheme, Clean India, Clean Ganga, and Smart Cities Mission. The EU supports Delhi's efforts on tackling its environment challenges. At their March 2016 summit, the EU and India agreed on two joint declarations: on an India-EU water partnership and on a clean energy and climate partnership. The joint declaration on partnership for smart and sustainable urban development signed at the India-EU Summit in October 2017 is the framework for EU support for India's urbanisation challenges.

EYE event - Sustainable city: Global picture, local colour

16-05-2018

Cities, home to most of the world's people and growing rapidly, are often where environmental problems both emerge and are resolved; they are where the fight for global sustainability will be won or lost.

Cities, home to most of the world's people and growing rapidly, are often where environmental problems both emerge and are resolved; they are where the fight for global sustainability will be won or lost.

Delivering the Urban Agenda for the EU

26-09-2017

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policymaking. To help ...

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policymaking. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched a public consultation following its July 2014 communication on the urban dimension of EU policies. Its findings indicated broad support among city stakeholders for an Urban Agenda for the EU. The European Parliament also prepared an own-initiative report on the issue, as part of a process that would ultimately lead to the signing of the Pact of Amsterdam on 30 May 2016, a clear political commitment to deliver an Urban Agenda. With eight urban partnerships now in operation and the members of the remaining four announced in April 2017, past months have seen visible progress in terms of delivering the Urban Agenda, with recent developments including the setting up of a permanent secretariat for the Urban Agenda and the publication of background papers by four partnerships, with their action plans expected soon. This process looks set to expand further following the 2016 UN Habitat III conference in Quito, which identified the Urban Agenda for the EU as the main delivery mechanism in the EU for the UN's New Urban Agenda, a roadmap for global sustainable urban development.

EU port cities and port area regeneration

27-04-2017

Ports have always been an important asset to Europe, serving as gateways to the rest of the world and as connection points to rivers across European territory. For centuries, ports and their cities developed hand in hand, the port generating prosperity for the city. This has changed with the industrial revolution, globalisation and the rapid development of containerisation. Most ports moved out of their cities and their mutual relationship began to suffer. Today, this relationship experiences a new ...

Ports have always been an important asset to Europe, serving as gateways to the rest of the world and as connection points to rivers across European territory. For centuries, ports and their cities developed hand in hand, the port generating prosperity for the city. This has changed with the industrial revolution, globalisation and the rapid development of containerisation. Most ports moved out of their cities and their mutual relationship began to suffer. Today, this relationship experiences a new dynamism, driven on both sides by the aspiration to revive ports after the recent crisis, while at the same time making the most of their potential as a stimulus for city life and regeneration. In recent years, a variety of policy options have been identified and their efficiency tested. Port authority organisations were among the first to realise that for ports to flourish in the long term, their cities also need to prosper, and began taking steps towards improving their mutual relations. The progressive development of the EU’s urban policies can pave the way to further joint development of ports and cities and offer new solutions to urban challenges, essential for achieving the smart, sustainable and inclusive society envisaged in the Europe 2020 strategy.

EU Urban Agenda – State of play

25-02-2016

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level. At the same time there have been increasing calls for concrete action and the development of an EU Urban Agenda to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in the process. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched ...

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level. At the same time there have been increasing calls for concrete action and the development of an EU Urban Agenda to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in the process. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched a public consultation following its July 2014 Communication on the Urban Dimension of EU policies. Its findings indicate broad support among city stakeholders for an EU Urban Agenda. The European Parliament has also prepared an own-initiative report on the issue as part of this process, which was adopted at the September 2015 plenary session. The revised 2014-2020 Cohesion Policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to increase the role of cities in cohesion programming and implementation and thus enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding. With the launch of Urban Innovative Actions and the introduction of the first four urban partnerships, recent months have seen both a strengthening of the cohesion policy framework and the first concrete action towards rolling out the Urban Agenda. Building on this momentum, the Dutch Council Presidency has put forward an ambitious roadmap for the coming months, which should lead to the signing in May 2016 of the Pact of Amsterdam, a binding political commitment to deliver on the promise of an EU Urban Agenda. This briefing is an update of an earlier one published in July 2015.

Financial Instruments under Cohesion Policy 2007-13: How Have Member States and Selected Financial Institutions Respected and Preserved EU Financial Interests?

04-02-2016

This study assesses the implementation of financial instruments (FIs) in Cohesion policy during the 2007-13 programming period. It takes stock of existing knowledge on the operation of FIs as reflected in the academic literature and policy documents. A comparative analysis of eight case studies, focusing on the different stages in the lifecycle of FIs, provides the basis on which to draw lessons from the implementation of FIs in 200713, highlighting implications for 2014-20.

This study assesses the implementation of financial instruments (FIs) in Cohesion policy during the 2007-13 programming period. It takes stock of existing knowledge on the operation of FIs as reflected in the academic literature and policy documents. A comparative analysis of eight case studies, focusing on the different stages in the lifecycle of FIs, provides the basis on which to draw lessons from the implementation of FIs in 200713, highlighting implications for 2014-20.

Externý autor

Fiona Wishlade, Rona Michie, Philip Vernon, Stefan Kah Ms Claudia Gloazzo (European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, the UK, for Chapters 1-4) ; Fabian Zuleeg, Claire Dheret and Iva Tasheva (European Policy Centre, Brussels, Belgium, for Chapter 5)

Bridging the rural-urban divide: Rural-urban partnerships in the EU

05-01-2016

In today's Europe, the traditional rural-urban dichotomy seems no longer relevant from a territorial development point of view. The boundaries of both rural and urban regions are becoming increasingly blurred, and traditional geographic definitions no longer fully reflect the reality of areas connected by a range of complex socio-economic linkages. At the European level, statistical methods have been refined to better reflect this complexity and provide a clearer view of the European Union's territory ...

In today's Europe, the traditional rural-urban dichotomy seems no longer relevant from a territorial development point of view. The boundaries of both rural and urban regions are becoming increasingly blurred, and traditional geographic definitions no longer fully reflect the reality of areas connected by a range of complex socio-economic linkages. At the European level, statistical methods have been refined to better reflect this complexity and provide a clearer view of the European Union's territory according to a new rural-urban typology. Both types of regions have different assets and resources which can be used in a complementary manner. At the rural/urban interface, however, conflicts can arise in connection to land use, whenever cities spread over what used to be agricultural land. Studies on the nature and extent of urban/rural linkages have identified the key concept of 'functional regions', which are defined by their socio-economic integration rather than by administrative boundaries. In all EU Member States, local and regional authorities have built rural-urban partnerships to better harness the potential of such regions. Over the past two decades, the EU has supported numerous projects and studies to assess the value of these partnerships and the way they can contribute to the objective of greater territorial cohesion. The policy framework for 2014-2020, which reflects the objectives of the EU 2020 strategy and offers better coordination of structural funds as well as new tools fostering integrated strategies, puts even greater emphasis on rural-urban interaction, allowing Member States to invest in mixed areas in a more targeted way. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Research for REGI Committee - Tools to support the territorial and urban dimension in cohesion policy: Integrated Territorial Investment (ITI) and Community-Led Local Development (CLLD)

30-10-2015

For the 2014-2020 programming period the regulations encourage the usage of integrated and place-based oriented approaches to foster economic, social and territorial cohesion , at the same time putting a greater weight on urban development actions in order to attain the Europe 2020 Strategy goals. These territorial approaches can be implemented by using tools such as the Integrated Territorial Investment (ITI) and the Community-Led Local Development (CLLD). The Partnership Agreements, between the ...

For the 2014-2020 programming period the regulations encourage the usage of integrated and place-based oriented approaches to foster economic, social and territorial cohesion , at the same time putting a greater weight on urban development actions in order to attain the Europe 2020 Strategy goals. These territorial approaches can be implemented by using tools such as the Integrated Territorial Investment (ITI) and the Community-Led Local Development (CLLD). The Partnership Agreements, between the Member States and the European Commission, should indicate how ITI and CLLD will be used by Member States and the types of areas and challenges that these mechanisms will address.

China: Economic Outlook, 2015

15-07-2015

China stands now at a crossroads, where factors that for many years contributed to its growth have nearly – if not completely – exhausted their potential. As domestic economic challenges grow more pressing, Beijing has embarked on a new development strategy to 'rebalance' its economy and reinforce its integration into global markets. A number of elements of this strategy – including the 'One Belt One Road' initiative – are likely to have a major impact across the globe.

China stands now at a crossroads, where factors that for many years contributed to its growth have nearly – if not completely – exhausted their potential. As domestic economic challenges grow more pressing, Beijing has embarked on a new development strategy to 'rebalance' its economy and reinforce its integration into global markets. A number of elements of this strategy – including the 'One Belt One Road' initiative – are likely to have a major impact across the globe.

Developing an EU urban agenda

09-07-2015

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level. At the same time there have been increasing calls for concrete action and the development of an EU Urban Agenda to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in the process. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched ...

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. Within the EU, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level. At the same time there have been increasing calls for concrete action and the development of an EU Urban Agenda to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in the process. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched a public consultation following its July 2014 Communication on the Urban Dimension of EU policies. Its findings indicate broad support among city stakeholders for an EU Urban Agenda. The European Parliament has also prepared a draft report on the issue as part of this process, which is due to be debated at the September plenary session. The revised 2014-20 Cohesion Policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to increase the role of cities in cohesion programming and implementation and thus enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding. Analysis of the operational programmes prepared thus far, however, reveals a low uptake of these instruments by the Member States, calling into question the commitment of national governments to the urban agenda. While the debate progresses, Member States continue to differ in terms of their vision of an EU Urban Agenda and the means to implement it. The EP has actively participated in this debate and aims to make a valuable contribution to the efforts of future presidencies to reach consensus and move the process forward.

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