52

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Internal market for electricity

12-07-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal for a regulation on the internal market for electricity, as part of a comprehensive legislative package on the energy union. The proposed regulation is aimed at making the electricity market fit for more flexibility, decarbonisation and innovation, by providing for undistorted market signals. It sets out rules for electricity trading within different time frames, and clarifies the responsibilities of market actors. It defines ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal for a regulation on the internal market for electricity, as part of a comprehensive legislative package on the energy union. The proposed regulation is aimed at making the electricity market fit for more flexibility, decarbonisation and innovation, by providing for undistorted market signals. It sets out rules for electricity trading within different time frames, and clarifies the responsibilities of market actors. It defines principles for assessing capacity needs at regional and European level and proposes design principles for market-based capacity mechanisms with cross-border participation. It introduces regional operational centres for handling-system operation and a European entity for distribution system operators. The Council adopted its general approach in December 2017. In the European Parliament, the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) adopted its report in February 2018. A provisional trilogue agreement was reached on 19 December 2018. The European Parliament adopted the text in the March II 2019 plenary session and the Council on 22 May 2019. The Regulation entered into force on 4 July 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

New rules for the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER)

12-07-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal for a regulation on the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER), as part of the ‘clean energy for all Europeans’ legislative package. The proposed regulation gives ACER a stronger role in the development of network codes and the coordination of regional decision-making. It furthermore assigns it a number of new tasks related to regional operational centres, the supervision of nominated electricity market ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal for a regulation on the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER), as part of the ‘clean energy for all Europeans’ legislative package. The proposed regulation gives ACER a stronger role in the development of network codes and the coordination of regional decision-making. It furthermore assigns it a number of new tasks related to regional operational centres, the supervision of nominated electricity market operators and the assessment of generation adequacy and risk preparedness. In the European Parliament, the proposal was referred to the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE), which adopted its report in February 2018. A provisional trilogue agreement was reached on 11 December 2018. The European Parliament adopted the text in the March II 2019 plenary session and the Council on 22 May 2019. The final act was signed on 5 June 2019 and published in the Official Journal on 14 June 2019. The Regulation entered into force on 4 July 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Risk-preparedness in the electricity sector

12-07-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on risk-preparedness in the electricity sector. This proposal addresses shortcomings in the existing legislation, notably a lack of regional coordination, and differing national rules and procedures. It would replace the existing legislation, and establish common rules on crisis prevention and crisis management in the electricity sector. Regional interdependencies would be taken into account in the preparation of national ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on risk-preparedness in the electricity sector. This proposal addresses shortcomings in the existing legislation, notably a lack of regional coordination, and differing national rules and procedures. It would replace the existing legislation, and establish common rules on crisis prevention and crisis management in the electricity sector. Regional interdependencies would be taken into account in the preparation of national riskpreparedness plans and in managing crisis situations. Transparency would be enhanced by requiring an ex-post evaluation of crisis situations. In the European Parliament, the proposal was referred to the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE), which adopted its report in February 2018. A trilogue agreement was reached in November 2018. The European Parliament adopted the text in the March II 2019 plenary session and the Council on 22 May 2019. The Regulation was published in the Official Journal on 14 June 2019 and entered into force on 4 July 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Governance of the energy union

16-01-2019

The Commission proposed a regulation on governance of the energy union, as part of its Clean Energy package (30 November 2016). The proposal aims to simplify the process of monitoring progress and help to implement the goals of Energy Union, in particular the 2030 EU targets on renewables, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. National energy and climate plans are to be prepared for the 2021-2030 period, followed by progress reports. Both plans and reports will use binding templates, and ...

The Commission proposed a regulation on governance of the energy union, as part of its Clean Energy package (30 November 2016). The proposal aims to simplify the process of monitoring progress and help to implement the goals of Energy Union, in particular the 2030 EU targets on renewables, energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. National energy and climate plans are to be prepared for the 2021-2030 period, followed by progress reports. Both plans and reports will use binding templates, and gain early input from the Commission. The proposed regulation envisages national and EU registries and inventories on greenhouse gas emissions for the post-2020 period, as a means to assess progress in meeting the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and concluded with a provisional agreement on 20 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018). It was published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Promoting renewable energy sources in the EU after 2020

15-01-2019

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation ...

In November 2016, the European Commission launched the Clean Energy package, including a recast of the Directive on the promotion of renewable energy sources (‘RES Directive’), with the objective of greatly increasing the share of RES in final energy consumption by 2030. The revised RES Directive aims to provide guiding principles on financial support schemes for RES, renewable energy self-consumption, energy communities and district heating. It seeks to enhance mechanisms for cross-border cooperation, simplify administrative processes, strengthen the sustainability and greenhouse gas emissions-savings criteria for biofuels, and mainstream the use of RES in the transport sector and in the heating and cooling sector. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2018 and resulted in a provisional agreement on 14 June 2018. The final text was formally adopted by Parliament (13 November 2018) and Council (4 December 2018), published in the Official Journal on 21 December 2018 and entered into force three days later. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Sector coupling: how can it be enhanced in the EU to foster grid stability and decarbonise?

19-11-2018

Sector coupling involves the increased integration of energy end-use and supply sectors with one another. This can improve the efficiency and flexibility of the energy system as well as its reliability and adequacy. Additionally, sector coupling can reduce the costs of decarbonisation. To foster the full potential of sector coupling in several end-use and supply applications, it is important that existing techno-economic, policy and regulatory barriers are removed. Furthermore, a more integrated ...

Sector coupling involves the increased integration of energy end-use and supply sectors with one another. This can improve the efficiency and flexibility of the energy system as well as its reliability and adequacy. Additionally, sector coupling can reduce the costs of decarbonisation. To foster the full potential of sector coupling in several end-use and supply applications, it is important that existing techno-economic, policy and regulatory barriers are removed. Furthermore, a more integrated approach to energy systems planning is needed. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy.

Zunanji avtor

Luc VAN NUFFEL, João GORENSTEIN DEDECCA, Tycho SMIT, Koen RADEMAEKERS, Trinomics B.V.

Third report on the state of the energy union

07-12-2017

On 24 November 2017, the European Commission adopted its third report on the state of the energy union, which was presented to the Parliament during the November II plenary session. This report outlines the significant progress made in delivering on the energy union, as well as the further steps that need to be taken to complete this goal by the end of the current parliamentary term. The report was accompanied by several new documents, reports and studies relating to EU energy policy.

On 24 November 2017, the European Commission adopted its third report on the state of the energy union, which was presented to the Parliament during the November II plenary session. This report outlines the significant progress made in delivering on the energy union, as well as the further steps that need to be taken to complete this goal by the end of the current parliamentary term. The report was accompanied by several new documents, reports and studies relating to EU energy policy.

EU–Kazakhstan Partnership Agreement

05-12-2017

In December 2017, the European Parliament is due to vote on whether to give consent to an Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement with Kazakhstan, which would replace a 1995 agreement.

In December 2017, the European Parliament is due to vote on whether to give consent to an Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement with Kazakhstan, which would replace a 1995 agreement.