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EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Energy supply and security

28-06-2019

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy ...

Energy policy is a competence shared between the EU and its Member States. Whereas the EU has responsibility under the Treaties to ensure security of supply, Member States are responsible for determining the structure of their energy supply and their choice of energy sources. EU legislation on security of supply focuses on natural gas and electricity markets, and is closely related to other EU objectives: consolidating a single energy market, improving energy efficiency, and promoting renewable energy sources to decarbonise the economy and meet the Paris Agreement goals. The 2014-2019 legislature saw numerous initiatives in connection with security of supply. The EU institutions reached agreement on a revised regulation on security of gas supply, a revised regulation on security of electricity supply, a revised decision on intergovernmental agreements in the energy field, a targeted revision of the gas directive to apply its key provisions to pipelines with third countries, and also new targets for energy efficiency and renewables by 2030. Parliament also adopted several own-initiative resolutions in the energy field, including one on the new EU strategy on liquefied natural gas and gas storage, which is key to gas supply security. Meanwhile, EU projects of common interest (PCIs) finance energy infrastructure that improves interconnection and supports security of supply. There is growing expectation among EU citizens that the EU will step up its involvement in energy supply and security. Whereas this view was shared by just over half of EU citizens in 2016 (52 %), it is now expressed by roughly two thirds (65 %). The EU will retain a key role in monitoring security of supply throughout the energy transition from the old system of centralised generation dominated by fossil fuels in national markets, towards a new system characterised by a high share of renewables, more localised production and cross-border markets. However, the EU would need to use a special legislative procedure if it wanted to intervene directly in determining the energy supply of its Member States. This procedure requires decision-making by unanimity in Council and only a consultative role for the Parliament. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Regional policy

28-06-2019

The principal aim of the EU's regional policy, also known as cohesion policy, is to address the territorial, social and economic imbalances that exist between the different regions of the EU. Regional policy covers all regions and cities of the European Union, helping to support job creation, business competitiveness, economic growth, sustainable development, and to improve citizens' quality of life. To achieve these goals and address the diverse development needs in all EU regions, €351.8 billion ...

The principal aim of the EU's regional policy, also known as cohesion policy, is to address the territorial, social and economic imbalances that exist between the different regions of the EU. Regional policy covers all regions and cities of the European Union, helping to support job creation, business competitiveness, economic growth, sustainable development, and to improve citizens' quality of life. To achieve these goals and address the diverse development needs in all EU regions, €351.8 billion – almost one third of the total EU budget – has been set aside for cohesion policy for the 2014-2020 period. This financial support is distributed through two main funds: the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF). Together with the European Social Fund (ESF), the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF), they make up the European structural and investment (ESI) funds, which provide support that can make a real difference to the lives of people in the EU's regions. With the current programming period (2014-2020) drawing to a close, work is now under way on planning the cohesion policy priorities for the next programming period (2021-2027). During its 2014-2019 term the European Parliament was called upon numerous times to adopt new legislative acts, amend older rules and to provide opinions on many topics relating to the EU's regional policy. Within the European Parliament, the Committee on Regional Policy is responsible for the Union's regional development and cohesion policy, as set out in the Treaties. In anticipation of its expected withdrawal from the EU, the UK, until now a net contributor to the EU budget, will no longer contribute to the post-2020 EU budget, which means that the EU will have fewer resources to allocate to its policies in the future, including cohesion policy. The European Parliament has, however, strongly advocated maintaining the level of funding for cohesion policy at its current level or even increasing it. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Ex Ante Conditionality in ESI Funds: State of Play and their potential impact on the Financial Implementation of the Funds

22-11-2018

This study is a detailed analysis of progress in the fulfilment of all Ex Ante Conditionalities in the Common Provision Regulation for ESI Funds. The process is almost complete (99%). A number of managing authorities have experienced delays during the process of compliance and in access to funds. This is manifested by a lower absorption rate, but that is believed to be temporary. Delays as a rule affected countries with lower administrative capacities; nevertheless, most authorities interviewed judged ...

This study is a detailed analysis of progress in the fulfilment of all Ex Ante Conditionalities in the Common Provision Regulation for ESI Funds. The process is almost complete (99%). A number of managing authorities have experienced delays during the process of compliance and in access to funds. This is manifested by a lower absorption rate, but that is believed to be temporary. Delays as a rule affected countries with lower administrative capacities; nevertheless, most authorities interviewed judged the framework beneficial (even if its costs were considered to be significant). Also the managing authorities in countries with better administrative capacities tended to see the process of proving compliance to be rather burdensome.

Zunanji avtor

Jorge Nuñez Ferrer, Cinzia Alcidi, Matthias Busse, Roberto Musmeci, Noriko Fujiwara

Research for TRAN Committee - BREXIT: transport and tourism - the consequences of a no-deal scenario

26-09-2018

The study investigates the potential impacts on the EU-27 of a no-deal scenario in the Brexit process, focusing on the transport, postal and tourism sectors. The study analyses both the economic policy and legislative dimension, detailing the practical consequences of such a new status quo. Alternatives to safeguard the EU interests are also discussed in the document and a set of practical recommendations is formulated. A no-deal scenario would seriously hurt both the UK and the EU-27 at least in ...

The study investigates the potential impacts on the EU-27 of a no-deal scenario in the Brexit process, focusing on the transport, postal and tourism sectors. The study analyses both the economic policy and legislative dimension, detailing the practical consequences of such a new status quo. Alternatives to safeguard the EU interests are also discussed in the document and a set of practical recommendations is formulated. A no-deal scenario would seriously hurt both the UK and the EU-27 at least in a short-term perspective, although with different intensity among the Member States.

Zunanji avtor

José Francisco PAPÍ FERRANDO, Raffaele ALFONSI, Sabine LANGER, Miguel TRONCOSO

Research for REGI Committee – Future links between structural reforms and EU cohesion policy

14-09-2018

This study assesses the extent to which the EU’s structural reform agenda could support EU member states in the transition to a new global economic environment in a way that complements Cohesion Policy objectives. It looks at the future links between structural reforms and EU Cohesion Policy in the context of the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework.

This study assesses the extent to which the EU’s structural reform agenda could support EU member states in the transition to a new global economic environment in a way that complements Cohesion Policy objectives. It looks at the future links between structural reforms and EU Cohesion Policy in the context of the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework.

Zunanji avtor

Robin HUGUENOT-NOEL, Alison HUNTER, Fabian ZULEEG

Material use in the European Union: Towards a circular approach

11-09-2018

Global material use has tripled during the past four decades, in particular as a result of increasing living standards. The use of materials, which need to be extracted from our environment, can pose environmental challenges. It can also be threatened by resource scarcity and price volatility. This is particularly true for Europe, which is strongly dependent on imported materials. There are a number of ways to consider material use in the European Union (EU). The breakdown of material use by types ...

Global material use has tripled during the past four decades, in particular as a result of increasing living standards. The use of materials, which need to be extracted from our environment, can pose environmental challenges. It can also be threatened by resource scarcity and price volatility. This is particularly true for Europe, which is strongly dependent on imported materials. There are a number of ways to consider material use in the European Union (EU). The breakdown of material use by types of materials indicates that non-metallic minerals, which include sand and gravel, account for almost half of the materials used in the EU. Material flows provide an overall picture of how materials enter, are used and finally leave the economy. Some of these materials stay in stocks, which are growing year after year. However, the efficiency of material use, measured through resource productivity, has increased substantially since 2000, in part as a result of the economic crisis. Material use in the EU is steered by policies related to different areas such as energy, waste and industry. Relevant policy documents include the 2011 roadmap to a resource-efficient Europe, the 2013 seventh Environment Action Programme and the 2015 circular economy action plan. The EU supports these policies with funding. Funding channels include the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, which allocated about €635 million between 2014 and 2020 for research on raw-material-related challenges. The European structural and investment funds also support developing more efficient material use practices. The European Parliament has advocated making the use of harmonised indicators for resource efficiency legally binding in the Member States and setting targets for increasing resource efficiency. Parliament has also supported broadening the scope of eco-design requirements to gradually include all relevant resource-efficiency features in product-design requirements.

The added value of European cohesion policy

06-09-2018

Cohesion policy provides the largest EU financial support, amounting to € 638 billion together with national co-financing for the period 2014-2020. Cohesion policy will help more than 7.4 million people find a job and over 8.9 million people gain new qualifications. 6.8 million children will get access to new or modernised schools and childcare facilities. For the European Parliament it is important that Cohesion Policy remains visible all over Europe.

Cohesion policy provides the largest EU financial support, amounting to € 638 billion together with national co-financing for the period 2014-2020. Cohesion policy will help more than 7.4 million people find a job and over 8.9 million people gain new qualifications. 6.8 million children will get access to new or modernised schools and childcare facilities. For the European Parliament it is important that Cohesion Policy remains visible all over Europe.

Research for REGI Committee - Digital agenda and cohesion policy

15-06-2018

This study provides a critical analysis of the contribution of Cohesion Policy and the European Structural Investment Funds to the Digital Agenda for Europe and the Digital Single Market. Based on the analysis of past and current patterns of ESIF digital investments and selected case studies, this study shows that Cohesion Policy should concentrate where its added value is highest, i.e., on support to the formulation of effective regional digital strategies and on the promotion of partnerships between ...

This study provides a critical analysis of the contribution of Cohesion Policy and the European Structural Investment Funds to the Digital Agenda for Europe and the Digital Single Market. Based on the analysis of past and current patterns of ESIF digital investments and selected case studies, this study shows that Cohesion Policy should concentrate where its added value is highest, i.e., on support to the formulation of effective regional digital strategies and on the promotion of partnerships between relevant stakeholders, at regional level and beyond.

Zunanji avtor

CSIL: Julie PELLEGRIN, Louis COLNOT supported by: Łukasz ARENDT, Luca BISASCHI, Gelsomina CATALANO, Žilvinas MARTINAITIS, Giorgio MICHELETTI

Research for CULT Committee - ESIF and culture, education, youth & sport – the use of European Structural and Investment Funds in policy areas of the Committee on Culture & Education

15-05-2018

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.

Zunanji avtor

The Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP (CSES): Mike Coyne, Malin Carlberg, Caroline Chandler, Eugenie Lale-Demoz

Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027: Commission Proposal - Initial comparison with the current MFF

04-05-2018

On 2 May, the Commission presented its proposal for the Multiannual Financial Framework for the 2021-2027 period (2021-2027 MFF), outlining the structure of the EU budget and the policy priorities of the EU for a period of seven years, together with proposals on own resources financing the EU budget and a proposal to link the EU budget and the rule of law. A series of further legislative proposals presenting the individual spending programmes is expected later in May and June. The Commission proposes ...

On 2 May, the Commission presented its proposal for the Multiannual Financial Framework for the 2021-2027 period (2021-2027 MFF), outlining the structure of the EU budget and the policy priorities of the EU for a period of seven years, together with proposals on own resources financing the EU budget and a proposal to link the EU budget and the rule of law. A series of further legislative proposals presenting the individual spending programmes is expected later in May and June. The Commission proposes that the 2021-2027 MFF (commitment appropriations) amounts to €1 135 billion in 2018 prices or 1.11 % of EU GNI. The previous MFF, converted into 2018 prices and including the European Development Fund (EDF) for comparative purposes, amounted to €1 138 billion or 1.03 % of EU GNI. Note, however, that this comparison does not take account of the various changes in programmes proposed or the impact of Brexit. The number of headings grows from the 2014-2020 MFF to 2021-2027 MFF, from five to seven, and some programmes change place from one heading to another. Regarding the structure of the 2021-2027 MFF, the Commission proposals have the ambition to align the budget closer to the political priorities, to simplify the structure of the EU budget (i.e. a reduced number of programmes), and to increase the flexibility within and between programmes.

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